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GOVERNMENT INFORMATION CENTER 
SAN FRANO800 PUBUC LBRARY 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

REFERENCE 
BOOK 

Not l<> be lukcii from I lie Libmry 



tytf 1 6 2001 



3 1223 05718 6455 



^RGHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ANNUAL REPORT 
FISCAL YEAR 1964-1965 



September, 1965 




3 1223 05718 6455 




City and County of San Francisco 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



270 CITY HALL 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 94102 



September 2, 1965 



Annual Report 
Fiscal Year 1964-65 



Mr. Thomas J . Mel Ion 

Chief Administrative Officer 

289 City Hal I 

Dear Mr. Mel Ion: 

The annual report of the Purchasing Department for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1965 is herewith respectfully submitted. 

As stated in detail in the report the department expended $17,857,039 by 
35,075 purchase orders and $10,381,108 by encumbrance requests; maintained 
25 storerooms; sold $36,990 surplus City property and did 7602 shop jobs 
in the amount of $979,394. Tabulating 3ureau furnished services in the 
amount of $148,791 and Reproduction Bureau in the amount of $117,500. 

Continued effort is being made by all bureaus to give departments faster 
and better service. 

The problems associated with operating with temporary help continue to be 
a matter of concern particularly at shops and in stores. 

The following statements on the activities of the department for past 
fiscal year answer the specific inquiries of the Mayor to all departments, 
dated August 5, 1965. 

1. With reference to capital programs, the facilities of the 
Reproduction Bureau were consolidated in Room 50 in the City 
Hall at which time the space was remodeled and enlarged. The 
work is described in more detail in the report. 

2. Recommendations on the activities of the department, as stated 
in the annual report include: 

a. Establish specification and control system for buying on a 
fu I I time basis. 

b. Establish vehicle management system to provide for trouble- 
free operation of vehicle fleet including an appropriate 
replacement program. 

c. Install the recently completed coding system for equipment, 
materials and supplies to the end that it can be used to 
the fullest advantage by City departments. 



4 45246 SFPL: ECONO JRS 
225 SFPL 12/22/00 105 



- 2 - 

Mr. Thomas J. Mellon, CAO Sep+ember 2, 1965 

d. Purchase of additional equipment for Reproduction Bureau for 
preparation of certain specifications and reports at a saving 
to various City departments as described in more detail in 
the report. 

3. The comparison of expenditures for all appropriations other than 
those for personal services with original budget appropriations 
for 1964-1965 is given in the appendix, annual report. Funds for 
departments' activities are obtained mainly by transfers from 
budget appropriations of other departments. 

4. The comparison of revenues with revenues estimated in the budget 
of 1964-1965 is given in the appendix, annua! report. 

5. The budget appropriations of other departments for automotive and 
other equipment services, and for tabulating and reproduction, 
should be increased yearly to compensate for the increase in work 
reauirea, and for steadily increasing labor and material costs. 

6. The statistics on work accomplished are given in the annual report, 

I wish to take the opportunity to thank you for your confidence in me in 
retaining me as Purchaser of Supplies and to thank my fellow workers in the 
Purchasing Department for their cooperation, loyalty and enthusiasm without 
which the department could not function as efficiently and as effectively. 

Very tru I y yours 



T. F. CONWAY / 
Purchaser of Supplies 



September, 1965 
ANNUAL REPORT 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and contractual 
services for all departments for the City and County, including city-owned 
utilities, and the San Francisco Unified School District; repairs and maintains 
automotive and other equipment for the various departments, except Public Utilities, 
and for the School District as requested; operates a central tabulating and repro- 
duction bureau for departments requiring its services; transfers to other departments 
for use or sells equipment and supplies no longer useful to any department of the 
city; maintains a perpetual inventory of equipment in the various departments; and 
operates central stores of the Purchasing and various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by the Shops on 
equipment and mechanical problems 3nd by the Bureau of Buying on new products, 
specifications and prices. 

PERSONNEL 

Employments totaled 205 permanent in five bureaus plus 2 temporary for 
developing a standard code. The Organization Chart is shown in the Appendix. 

S upervisory - June 30, 1965 

Admi n i strat i ve 

T. F. Conway - Purchaser of Supplies 
H. H. Shiman - Secretary 



Bureaus 



Buying 

J. C. Gavin - Assistant Director of Purchasing & Services - Bureau Head 

C. P. Webster - Senior Purchaser 

H. R. Stevens - Coding Supervisor 

Equipment and Supplies 

J. H. Beck - Stores and Equipment Supervisor - Bureau Head 

E. G. Chapman - Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor (acting) 



Bureaus - Continued 



Personnel and Accounts 



M. J. Wehrle - Chief Clerk - Bureau Head 
R. A. Davis - Principal Clerk 

Shops 

A. M. Flaherty - General Superintendent of City Shops - Bureau Head 
E. A. Rames, Assistant Superintendent City Shops 

Tabu latinq 

H. Eg I i ht - Tabulating Division Supervisor (acting) - Bureau Head 
J. W. Bender - Tabulating Division Supervisor (Temporary assianment to EDP 
Staff) 

Reproduction 

T. J. Ryan - Blueprint and Reproduction Manager - Bureau Head 



The valued services of the following were separated from City employment 
through retirement after years of meritorious accomplishment 

Approx. Years 
Position 



Name 

James W. MacBride 
Robert A. Rol ler 
John A. Stone 
Arthur Reynolds 
Orel B. Frank 
John P. Kel ty 
Douglas C. Lee 
Herbert R. Stevens 



Photo-L i thoqrapher 
Maintenance Machinist 
Automotive Serviceman 
Automotive Machinist 
Pattern Maker 
Au tomot i ve Se rv i cema n 
Tabu I ting Machine Operator 
Coding Supervisor 



City Service 


Date 


24 


9-1-64 


22 


1 1-1-64 


18* 


1 1 - 1 -64 


21 


1 1 - 1 6-64 


I8i 


4-1-65 


22 


4-1-65 


n 


5-1-65 


21 


6-30-65 



2 - 



Work Accomp I ished 

The work accomplished in the fiscal year, described in more detail under 
thf steiPiti guFfaus remained substantially the'same over-all as in 1963-64. 

Recapitulation is as follows: 

Bureau Unit 1963-1964 1964-1965 



Buying Purchase Orders 33,712 35,075 

Amount $17,096,345 $17,857,039 

Encumbrance Requests 

Amount $14,204,233 $10,381,108 

Stores & Equipment Surplus Sales - Amount $ 37,951 $ 36,990 

Major Stores operated II I I 

Shops Job Orders 6,703 7,602 

Expenditures $ 943,602 $ 979,394 

Tabulating Services rendered - Amount $ 137,023 $ 148,791 

Reproduction Services rendered - Amount $ 65,821 $ 117,500 



3 - 



GENERAL COMMENTS 

The past year, while not marked by material changes in facilities, 
procedures and methods saw steady progress being made in many areas. 

Additional expansion of the use of travelling requisitions continues to 
reduce paper work by e4 imi nating repetitive typing and processing. 

Continued increase in products and services under term contracts has been 
of material benefit to the Purchasing and using departments. 

The Materials and Supplies Code was applied to purchase documents on a trial 
basis in preparation for full use starting July I, 1965. Studies continue to be 
made as to the desirability of additional uses of the system. 

The specification and control section formed for studies which cannot be 
done by buyers without impairing their work functioned on an intermittent basis 
because of lack of personnel. The need for expanding this function to full time 
is clearly apparent in view of rapid technological advances in processes, eauipment, 
and materials and supplies. 

Use of Friden Flexowriters for bids, automated purchase order writing and 
blanket orders continued. New functions are continually being performed. This 
method has been found to be of immeasurable value because original source data can 
be reused from tapes. 

Storekeeping records and control were materially improved because of more 
direct supervision, improved methods, and departmental cooperation. The bureau, 
however, has been handicapped because of lack of personnel and the extended use of 
temporary employments. 

Central Shops at 800 Quint Street continued to function efficiently. As 
stated elsewhere, work continues on vehicle management procedure. 

The Hall of Justice Service Station has been highly successful in serving 
the Police and other departments at the Hall of Justice and some City Hall vehicles. 
It is expected that the services provided will be expanded particularly qreasing, 
minor adjustments, tires, and inspection for the proposed preventative maintenance 
program. 

The Purchasing Department is actively participating in the EDP program. 
The Purchaser is on the committee appointed by the CAO for application to depart- 
ments under him; the Tabulating Division Supervisor is now on leave assigned to the 
EDP project; a number of department employees took general courses in this subject. 



4 - 



BUREAU OF BUYING 

This Bureau procures materials and supplies, equipment, insurance, contracts 
for services, for all city departments and the San Francisco Unified School District. 
Except for term contracts based on estimated quantities, all buying starts with 
receipt of requisition from the using department. Included in or incidental to the 
procurement function are the following: (outlined in detail in a previous report) 

I . Buying - Bids and Awards 

Preparation of bids including contractual and technical requirements; 
evaluation of bids; and award of bids. 
i 
I I . Buying - Related Functions 

Analysis of records of average use; maintenance of specification file; 
new term contracts; and review of procedures. 

PERSONNEL 

The Buying Division is headed by the Assistant Director of Purchasing and 
Services and includes II assistant purchasers. The clerical staff, under the 
Bureau of Personnel and Accounts, is engaged in typing, mailing, opening and 
tabulating bids, maintaining bid index and specifications file, and typing contracts. 
Funds for some of these employments, both buying and clerical, are provided by other 
departments. 

Detailed employments are as follows: 

I Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 

1 Senior Purchaser 
7 Purchasers 

2 Purchasers (Printing) 
I Assistant Purchaser 

OPERATIONS 

Purchasing work is assigned on a commodity basis with allowance for items 
of a special nature or in cases where seasonal peaks or vacation period make it 
advisable to temporarily deviate from this policy. 

Periodic meetings of the buying staff permit the exchange of ideas, explana- 
tion of improved procedures and qenerally keep the assistant purchasers informed as 
to the over-all progress and problems. 

Every effort is made to process requisitions as rapidly as possible but 
delays occur due to lack of personnel, inadequate information furnished with 
requisitions, and failure of departments to submit requisitions promptly for equip- 
ment items that are to be grouped for purchase for purposes of standardization and 
economy. 

In preparing requisitions, departments are requested to furnish information 

that will indicate a standard of over-all quality and usefulness suitable for actual 

use requirements and permit competition as required by the Charter and Administrative 

Code. A new form has been devised for this purpose to be used starting July I, 1965, 

with the hope that it will make it easier for departments to furnish desirable 

information for bid purposes. 

- 5 - 




Testing File Cabinets at Central Shops 
Only the sturdiest and easiest operating file cabinets "get past" this 
apparatus, designed and built at the Central Shops. Other tests, not 
requiring special equipment, are also applied to the cabinets. Tests 
are based on U.S. Government standards and special City requirements. 



BUREAU OF BUYING - Continued 



OPERATIONS - Continued 



As time is available personnel are assigned to: 

1. Review specifications, forms and procedures. 

2. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing additional term 
contracts for articles and services where desirable. 



The need for a separate section to expand the above services is apparent if 
the department is to most efficiently and effectively perform its purchasing 
functions. This work is now being done on an intermittent basis as time is avail- 
able. Every effort should be made to procure a full time employment for this work. 

Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into for various service and 
commodities in general use by several departments or recurring use by a department. 
The main advantages are elimination of the time lag resulting when individual bids 
are requested and elimination of the costs involved in individual bids. 

New term contracts initiated during the year include: 

1. Plumbers' & Steamf itters' Materials & Supplies 

2. Binding Paperback Books 

3. Fittings, Bronze, A.W.W.A. 

4. Tube, Copper 

Some purchases or contracts of an unusual nature include the following: 



TESTING 



Mobile Hydraulic Operated Aerial Tank 

Visual Illusions Generator 

Multiple Sample Absorbance Recorder 

Dry Cleaning Equipment for Occupational Training under Manpower 

Development and Training Act 
Closed Circuit Television System 
Electroencepha lo Graphic Machine 
Gas Laser 
Pittosporum-phi I lyraeaides (Desert Willow Tree) 



The Purchasing Department does not have a fully-equipped testing laboratory 
as such although certain testing, particularly of fire hose and file cabinets, can 
be done at the Central Shops and some checking of canned goods can be done at the 
Central Warehouse. Of course, inspections and tests not requiring special equipment 
are done at all major receiving stations and stores as a routine procedure. 

The lack of a fu i ly-equipped laboratory in the Purchasing Department itself 
has been largely offset by the cooperation of other departments which have labora- 
tories or special equipment. 

The Department of Public Works has, for many years, made the personnel and 
facilities of their City Hall laboratory freely available and somewhat more 
recently the laboratories at the Sewage Treatment and Disposal Plants. 



BUREAU OF BUYING - Continued 
TESTING - Cont. 

The Department of Public Health has been very helpful particularly as regards 
various foodstuffs. 

The Sealer of Weights and Measures has furnished equipment and participated 
in test of metal office furniture. 

The San Francisco Water Department has recently made exhaustive, pre-qual if I- 
cation tests of certain items peculiar to the use of this department. 

The Municipal Railway supervises pre-qual i fy inq tests for brake blocks for 
use on motor and trolley coaches and their shop records produce information which 
in effect represents results of operating tests of vehicle components. 

The School Department and other City departments charged with building main- 
tenance continuously make pre-qual i fying tests of floor wax. 

A few years ago the Airport and the War Memorial made tests of toilet seat 
cover dispensers while, more recently, the Airport made a comparison test of 
various types of paper towels. 

In short, we have enjoyed the whole-hearted cooperation of the above and 
other City departments in making various tests. I believe that this has been done 
on occasions when it was an inconvenience to the department. 

VEH I CLE MANAGEMENT 

We are meeting periodically with personnel from the Mayor's office, the 
Chief Administrative Officer's office and the Controller's office to develop a 
comprehensive vehicle management program. It is intended that this be presented 
to the Board of Supervisors for necessary legislation in time so that it may be 
effective beginning July I, 1966. 

BUREAU OF PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS 

This Bureau is supervised by a Chief Clerk and Principal Clerk with 23 
permanent employees. One permanent clerk previously assigned to this bureau was 
reassigned to Coding Division in October, 1964. These permanent employments were 
supplemented by temporary clerk typists as needed to expedite purchase order prepra- 
tion when work load was unusually heavy as extra typing is now required on purchase 
orders due to various codes as shown below. 

Sales of charters, codes and other documents amounted to $1423. 

Discounts earned amounTed to $62,612 or 98.7?. and discounts unearned $830 or 
1.3/b. Comparable figures for the previous year were $58,426 or 97.7? and discounts 
unearned $1,363 or 2.3?. 

Traveling Requisitions have been expanded to include School Department 
effective January I, 1965. 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS - Continued 

Use of the Friden Flexowriter and Computyper was expanded. The Computyper 
is used at full capacity most of the time. The Flexowriter was used for blanket 
purchase orders on traveling requisitions to supplement Computyper for the past 
several months when there was an overload of work for the Computyper. Tapes of 
traveling requisitions were run for purchase orders on the Flexowriter. This machine 
was also used to punch some of the new tapes for July as all new tapes were required 
en traveling requisitions due to new coding and other chanqes. 

The tabulating of bid quotations by microfilming was initiated for the 
Controller's records and Purchasing Department's permanent records. 

Contract proposal bids are microfilmed for the Controller, School Department, 
public record, and Purchasing Department permanent records. 

A Reauisition Register was established and vendor and bid index maintained. 
New codes for purchase orders to include vendor location, buyer, and commodity were 
initiated. 

CODING DIVISION 

The material and supplies cede has been adopted (subject to routine changes 
and additions) for full use with purchasing documents. 

The Codification Catalog has been printed and distributed and meetings have 
been held with, the personnel cf the various departments who will use the code. The 
catalog is based on the format established by the Armed Forces Supply Center and has 
a nine diait code arranged as follows: 

353-06-0001. The first digit, 3, indicates Material and Supplies and is the 
first diqit of the Object of Expenditure, "O.E.' 1 . (If the article is classed 
as equipment the first digit will be 4.) The next two digits, 53, are the 
Group Numbers and last two digits of the O.E. The fourth and fifth digits 
are the Class Digits, and the last four digits are the Item Numbers. The City 
of San Francisco Supply Classification Code consists of 60 Groups of the 99 
Groups that are available, and uses 542 out of the 999 Classes. This leaves 
39 Groups and 457 Classes available for future expansion. Each Group is 
published as a separate catalog due to the fact some departments will require 
only four or five groups; others will require 40 or more. Each group is 
punched for a loose leaf binder and stapled. 

The Cataloging Handbook contains instructions on how to use the new 
code, a breakdown of the approved unit abbreviations, the index of material to proper 
group numbers and a commodity classification breakdown into group and class numbers. 
This catalog will be furnished to all departments requisitioning material. 

The Codification Catalogs have item code numbers for material stocked by the 
various departments of the City as well as items that have been ordered periodically 
the past year or so. These catalogs will be kept up to date by issuing a supplement 
to each group as items are added or deleted. 

- 8 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT 

The Bureau of Stores and Equipment operates and maintains a central warehouse 
and storerooms in various City departments; receives and issues materials, supplies 
and equipment for all departments of the City and County of San Francisco; and makes 
miscellaneous emergency purchases for the account of the various agencies. This 
Bureau arranges for the sale of and sells surplus and obsolete personal property 
belonging to the City, exchanges equipment between departments, maintains a perpetual 
inventory of all materials purchased for the City and County of San Francisco and 
makes periodic checks of such property. The Bureau maintains control of the entire 
automotive fleet, including the listing, insurance and the reporting of all accidents. 

The following locations are staffed and operated by the Division of Sales, 
Inventory and Stores: 



Name and Location 



Type 



Amount of Inventory 



Central Warehouse 



Dept. Pub I ic Works 
Water Department 
Hetch Hetchy 



15th & Harrison 



- 2323 Army St. 

- 639 Bryant Street 

- Moccasi n, Cal i f . 



Stationery 
Janitorial Supp I ies 
400C Cases Foodstuffs 
Miscellaneous Furniture 
Pipe, etc. 



San Francisco Airport - South San Francisco 



Municipal Rai I way 



Health Department 



Pub! ic Wei fare 



Dept. of Electricity 

Recreation and Park 

Sheriff 

Central Shop Store 

** Storage only 

PERSONNEL 



- 24th & Utah Sts. and 2 sub-stores 

- General Store 

- Elkton Yard (Bond Fund) 

- Potrero and one sub-store 

- Washington & Mason (sub-store) 

- SF General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

- Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th & Dewey 

- Hassler Health Home, Redwood City 

- Single Mens 1 Rehabilitation Center, 

Redwood City 
901 Rankin Street 
Golden Gate Park 



- Hall of Justice Garage (Sub Store) 

- Amount included with departmental inven 



tory 



77 

446 

34 

17 

154 

252 

44 

82 

45 

198 

154 

27 

4 
36 
16 
42 
31 



,776 

,331 

** 

** 
** 

,432 
,270 
,395 
,211 
,474 
,147 
,747 
,003 
,419 
,700 
,063 
,820 

,446 
,144 
,400 
,917 

,788 



The Sales, Inventory, and Stores Divisions are staffed by the following 
I Stores and Equipment Supervisor 
I Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 
I Senior Clerk-^Stenographer 

1 Senior Clerk-Typist 

2 Inventory Clerks 

10 Senior Storekeepers (+ I more 12-1-64) 
21 Storekeepers 
8 Assistant Storekeepers 
Laborer 



Total 



J_ 
46 



- 9 - 



BUREAU OF STO RES AND EQUIFMENT - Continued 

SALES DIVISION 

Thirty-one sales were conducted during the fiscal year under the authority 
of Section 88 of the Charter. Sales activities included legal research into various 
aspects of different sales, preparation of sales, inviting interested buyers to bid, 
opening and awarding of bids, collecting and depositing all money received from 
buyers with the City Treasurer and keeping records of correspondence relative to the 
sales. 

Tne total revenue from the sales of 1964-1965 was $36,990. A general break- 
down of the sales is as follows: 



Block Books $ 




224 


Fi re Hose 




959 


Miscellaneous Jewelry 




220 


X-Ray Film 


2 


,051 


Technical Instrument 




218 


Waste Paper 


1 


,913 


Grease & Bones 


1 


,848 


Scrap Met a 1 


6 


,878 


Auto & Truck 


16 


,966 


M i see 1 1 aneous Sa 1 es 




381 


Sand 


4 


,748 


Sacks and Containers 




584 


Tota 1 $ 


36 


,990 



The Bureau continued the selling of used automobiles by public sale. Eighty- 
six passenger automobiles and 21 trucks were sold. During the coming fiscal year 
several different types of automotive sales will be tried in order to determine 
which one will realize the most revenue for the City. 

INVENTORY DIVISION 



During the fiscal year this division arranged the transfer of surplus and 
rehabilitated office equipment between City departments, realizing a savings to the 
City of $38,000 - inventory book value. 

The accumulation of various scrap metal piles, waste paper, I.B.M. Tab Cards, 
and used office equipment was disposed of by sale to contractor. Meetings with 
department heads and moving contractor were followed through for moving estimates 
and procedure. 

The program of investigating and reporting on lost or damaged equipment and 
required data for adjustments from Inventory was carried out. This division also 
has the assignment of maintaining the perpetual inventory of all City equipment. 

In cooperation with the Department of Social Services a crew of eight men and 
two women typists were assigned to this division for job training. This group made 
a physical check of equipment, and affixed decals where necessary, in twenty-three 
City departments. This information is now being processed by the Tabulating Bureau. 
On completion, the inventory findings will be presented to the respective department 
heads for acknowledgment and acceptance. 

- 10 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 

An important responsibility of this di vision continues to be automobile 
record control. The integration of the automobile administration into a central 
control, with the use of the IBM system, is now fully operational. This provides a 
practical, comprehensive and flexible program in dealing with acquisition, assign- 
ment, licensing, insurance and disposition of the City's entire automobile fleet, 
valued at $2,000,000, and comprising of approximately 3,000 vehicles. Automobile 
insurance coverages were extended to cover all City vehicles with the exclusion of 
emergency vehicles - police, fire, ambulances, and Municipal Railway revenue vehicles, 
Insurance coverages have been continued at $100/100,000 Bodily Injury Liability and 
$100,000 Property Damage Liability, thus affording substantial protection. 

STORES DIVISION 

This past year we finally acquired our full complement of permanent Assist- 
ent Storekeepers. However, one of our Assistant Storekeepers was promoted to Store- 
keeper and another examination will be required to fill the resulting vacancy. 

The San Francisco Water Department asked for two additional Storekeepers and 
received one by reclassifying one of their Laborers. 

A mezzanine floor was added to the Central Shops' storeroom giving much 
needed soace and additional bins. 

The Municipal Railway E I kton Storeroom is trying to get a fork lift which, if 
forthcoming, will permit more efficient operation. 

The Storekeepers have been very busy conforming to the new coding system. 
In the past deoartments had their own coding systems. This meant that they had to 
change from their own coding system to the new which entailed a lot of work. With 
all departments using the same coding system desired uniformity will be accomplished, 

GENERAL 

ApDointing a safety delegate to visit the various storerooms has proved very 
successful. The only casualty necessitating time off was a wrenched knee. 

Several Storekeepers availed themselves of the opportunity to attend the 
Supervisory and Rapid Reading Courses offered by the Civil Service. 

The Stores and Equipment Supervisor and Stores and Equipment Assistant 
Supervisor participated in several State Oral boards for Storekeepers' examinations. 
The Stores and Equipment Supervisor attended several meetings of the Material 
Handling Society and went on two Dlant tours; the C & H Sugar Company, and the 
General Motors Plant - both very interesting tours. 

The Civil Service has been requested to survey three of the storerooms; 
Airport, Hassler Health Home and Department of Public Works, with a view to reclass- 
ifying the positions. This is still under study and no disposition has been made to 
date. 




Three post vehicle hoist Installed In Fire Apparatus Shop 
for more efficient repair and service to fire equipment. 




RECENTLY DELIVERED REPLACEMENT VEHICLES 

165 HEW AND REPLACEMENT VEHICLES WERE RECEIVED AND OUT- 
FITTED FOR SERVICE AT THE CENTRAL SHOPS THIS FISCAL YEAR. 



BUREAU OF SHOPS 

Section 88 of the Charter of the City and County of San Francisco provides 
that the Purchaser of Supplies shall have charge of a central garage and shop for the 
repair of City and County equipment. 

As a result the Central Shops and allied facilities provide all necessary 
mechanical maintenance and repair service for all City departments and bureaus 
(excepting Public Utilities). In addition, it is the responsibility of this Bureau 
to inspect, appraise and make recommendations on all City owned vehicles contemplate':' 
for replacement, aid the various departments in the writing of specifications, to 
receive and approve all new vehicles delivered to the City and to outfit and prepare 
these vehicles for service. 



Administration and major repair facilities are located at the Central Shops, 
800 Quint Street. Other installations are: Golden Gate Park Shop, providing main- 
tenance for Recreation and Park Department equipment; Hal I of Justice Service Station, 
where fuel and lubricants are provided for Police and other City cars, and inspection 
and light maintenance for Police vehicles; Dept. of Public Works' Army Street Yard 
and 19th Avenue Station; Health Dept. Garage; and Department of Electricity Yard. 

The Central Shops have four main maintenance shop areas: I. Automobile, 
2. Truck, 3. Fire Apparatus, 4. Machine, and the following auxiliary shops: Blacksmith, 
Pattern, Paint, Hose, Upholstery, Body & Fender, Tire, and Service Station. In 
addition to the resDonsi bi I i ties for the maintenance and repair of mechanical equip- 
ment in school buildings, sewage plants, pumping stations, public buildings, etc., 
1876 motorized units of the City owned fleet are maintained, an increase of 21 over 
last year. These vehicles are valued at over 6.7 million dollars. 

The Bureau is staffed with 94 budgeted employments as follows: 

I City Shops General Superintendent 

I Assistant Suoer i ntendent City Shops 

3 Automotive Machinist Foremen 

I Automotive Machinist Sub-Foreman 

I Automotive Mechanic Sub-Foreman 

I Maintenance Machinist Foreman 

9 Maintenance Machinist 

23 Automotive Machinist 

8 Automotive Mechanic 

27 Automotive Servicemen 

1 Automotive Serviceman Sub-Foreman 

2 Pattern Makers 

3 Car & Auto Painters 

3 Body & Fender Workers 
3 Blacksmith 
We I de r 
Uphol sterer 
Chauffeur 

Senior Account Clerk 
Accountant 
Account Clerk 

Clerk Typist (Added this fiscal year through 
work order contributions) 
In addition, I General Storekeeper and I Storekeeper are assigned to the 
Central Shoos to procure, store and issue stock and supplies. 

- 12 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

This past year saw four veteran employees of the Central Shops retire after 
many years of faithful service to the City. 

Robert Roller Maintenance Machinist 

Oral Frank Patternmaker 

John Kelly Automotive Serviceman 

Arthur Reynolds Automotive Machinist 

The zeal and skills of these former employees will not easily be replaced. 

Automobi le Shop 

This shop staffed with 7 Automotive Mechanics, 2 Automotive Servicemen and 
I Automotive "'echanic Foreman, Mr. Roy Didier, is responsible for the repair and 
maintenance of 588 City owned passenger cars. 

A total of 2612 jobs were completed by this shop. 

43 new Police cars, 5 new Fire Department cars dIus 62 various passenger type 
automobiles were received, inspected and outfitted for service. 

In addition, 5 rebuilt engines were installed, 25 engines were major overhauled, 
123 minor engine jobs were performed. 

81 stick transmissions were overhauled and 123 clutches were replaced. 152 
automatic transmissions were adjusted and serviced, 51 overhauled and 26 re-sealed. 

109 road calls and tow jobs were performed. 

264 major and minor body and fender damage jobs were repaired. 

Fire Apparatus Shop 

This shop is responsible for the maintenance, repair, and service of 221 units 
of heavy duty fire apparatus. 

The staff consists of 9 Automotive Machinists, I Automotive Serviceman, and 
I Automotive Machinist Foreman, Mr. Leonard Counihan. 

During the fiscal year, a total of 1073 shop jobs were completed, and 1974 
field service calls made. 

Three new triple combination fire Dumps and one new 100' aerial truck were 
tested, eguipped, and put into service as were two new high pressure system service 
trucks, and two Bureau of Stores and Eauipment service trucks. 

The following partial list of completed jobs is typical of the work done in 
this shop: 

15 major engine repair or overhauls 
60 minor engine repair or overhauls 
45 transmissions repaired or overhauled 
83 engi ne tune ups 

- 13 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Fire Apparatus Shop - Continued 

100 brake system repairs 
iO sets safety brakes installed 
40 radiators repaired 
32 muffler and tail pipe repairs 
52 fire pump repairs 
27 aerial ladder repairs 

8 booster tanks refinished and or repaired 
37 vehicles equipped with reauired safety items 
57 chassis repairs 
51 clutches replaced 
59 clutches adjusted or repaired 
15 gas tanks repaired 

Increased activity of the Fire Department, and its apparatus, Duts a relative 
demand upon the services of the Shops. It is hoped that an additional employee might 
soon be acquired in this shop so that the preventative maintenance and inspection 
program might be fully augmented. This program is essential to insure the fire 
service of minimum apparatus down time. 

With the cooperation of the Department of Public Works, a three post hoist was 
installed in the Fire Shop area (see illustration). This hoist, capable of lifting 
both two axle and three axle fire aDparatus of any length, will be an invaluable 
asset to the shop. It will permit year-round lube and service ooeration on all fire 
apparatus, not possible in the past, when this work had to be done in an open yard 
with improper facilities; and, in addition, will permit greater efficiency and ease 
of repair on the many mechanisms available only from the under side of the apparatus. 

Truck Shop 

This shop is responsible for the maintenance and repair of 675 varied pieces 
of heavy duty type automotive equipment used by the various City departments. 

A tctal of 2212 jobs were completed during the past fiscal year. The shoo is 
staffed with 10 Automotive Machinists, 2 Automotive Servicemen under the supervision 
of Foreman Auto Machinist James Elliot. 

A sample of the 'out of the ordinary" work performed in this shop: 2 advanced 
design street paint trucks outfitted for service including compressor installation, 
large capacity pressure paint pot and stencil racks. 

Modification of compressor trucks to provide for a more efficient means of 
service and the redesigning of the ; 'water load : ' system in street sweepers for faster 
operation. 

The major part of a program to modify the air brake systems on 41 heavy trucks 
to comply with State safety requirements was completed this year. Three units remain 
to be done early in the next year. 

With the assistance of the Department of Public Works, two heavy duty twin 
post hoists were installed in this shop. These will provide for a safer and more 
efficient means of repairing heavy vehicles. 

- 14 - 



3UREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Machine Shop 

This section of the Central Shops is responsible for all non-autcmoti ve repair, 
reconstruction and repair and maintenance of City equipment. 

The actions of this function of Central Shops consists of complete mechanical 
repair to bridges, parks, industrial art sections of the school system, Public Works, 
the high pressure fire system, and the operating equipment and tools of the Fire 
Department, plus many others too numerous to detail. 

Services include the machining and manufacture of machine parts with final 
assembly and installation where required, including the manufacture of special equip- 
ment and tooling when requested. 

Personnel of this division operate under direction of the General Superintend- 1 
ent and his assistant through the Maintenance Machinist Foreman, Mr. J.J. Raos who 
supervises the activities of 10 Maintenance Machinists. 

Activities during the year were covered by 953 separate and distinct jobs. 
Descriptions of these were of an involved nature, plus 120 miscellaneous machine 
operations for the auto section. 

A few major jobs during the year were: 

1. San Andreas Pump - Overhaul 2 large throttle valves. Main water service, 

the County Jail #2. 

2. Vicente Sewage Pump Station - Complete overhaul main pumps, realigning 

shafting to these pumps. 

3. Islasis Creek Bridge - Renewing of bearings and realigning drive units on 

the north leaf of the bridge. 

4. Lloyd Lake Park Rec - Overhaul large main circulating pump. 

5. Various Schools - Assisted State Elevator Inspector inspecting passenger, 

and freight elevators to determine safety of operation. 

6. Hassler Health - Complete overhaul of main water circulation pump. 

7. Third Street Bridae - Complete repairs to damaged crossing gate. 

8. Mai n Li brary - Complete overhaul and conversion of main heating blower. 

9. War Memorial - Complete repairs to auditorium ventilating fan. 
Recreation and Park Automotive Shop 

This shop, located in the Maintenance Yard area of Golden Gate Park, is staffed 
with 3 Automotive Machinists, one Automotive Serviceman, and one Automotive Machinist 
Foreman, Mr. A. Kerri . 

Maintenance and repairs were performed on the following pieces of equipment 
operated by the Recreation and Park Department. 

- 15 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Recreation & p ark Automotive Shop - Continued 

21 Passenger cars 
53 Truck of all types 
I I Tractor lowers 
4 Tractor Loaders 
38 "'i seel lanecus - as D6 Caterpillar Tractor-Cat. Grader-Chipper, Sweepers, 

Air CcmDressors, Pumps, etc. 
135 Power operated lowers 
65 Hand Mowers 
35 Miscellaneous pieces such as Threaders, Spikers, Soray Machines, Rote 

Ti I lers, and Power Saws 

During the past fiscal year a total of 822 jobs were completed on automotive 
equipment and over 600 jobs on various power and hand mowers. 

This shoe is understaffed for the volume of work required of it. The prepon- 
derance of motorized equi orient used by the Park Department employees and the severe 
service that it is put to reauires maintenance and repair in excess of the ability 
of the shops lirited crew. 

A preventative maintenance and insoection program is essential for the 
efficient and safe operation of this fleet but has not been Dossible as the critical 
lack of manpower precludes performance of anything other than immediate necessary 
reoai rs. 

Hall of Justice Service Station 

This unit of the Central Shops is located adjacent to the Hall of Justice and 
provides fuel and service to Police Department vehicles, and fuel and oil to other 
City departments. The Station is operated 7 days a week from 7 a.m. to midnight. It 
is staffed with 9 Automotive Servicemen, 2 Automotive Mechanics, and I Sub-Foreman. 

The convenient location of this station for City vehicles and the accelerated 
usage of Police vehicles have made this station a high volume distribution point 
for auto fuels and lubricants. 

The past year shows the following services performed: 

Gasoline dispensed 456,151 Gal. 

Oi I dispensed 16,374 Ots. 

Tow jobs I ,694 

Tires changed (new and recaps) 2,446 

Batteries (new or recharged) 533 

Grease & service jobs I ,599 

Mechanical repairs 5,907 
Motorcycle Service: 

Oi I changes 668 

Tires (new or recaps) 266 

Batteries (new or recharged) 453 

The preventative maintenance service and inspection program continues to pay 
dividends in a better operating Police fleet with reduced down time due to mechanical 
f ai I ure. _ I 5 _ 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Hall of Justice Service Station - Cont. 

There still exists, however, the need for an additional employee in this area 
so that this "high mileage" fleet night be serviced and inspected at proper intervals. 

As the tempo of Police activity increases with the many demands put upon that 
department so, too, must the automotive maintenance facilities keep pace with their 
needs. 

s attern Shop and Ladder Shops 

This sub-shop, staffed with 2 Patternmakers, is responsible for the repair and 
manufacture of all wood products reguired in the operation of the Central Shops. 

77 Fire Department ladders repaired and overhauled 

8 Patterns manufactured 

3 Fire ladders manufactured 
15 Hose bumoers manufactured 

Plus over 200 other items manufactured or repaired mainly for the Fire Dept. 

Upholstery Shop 

This sub-shoD with I Upholsterer manufactures and repairs leather goods, belts, 
covers, safety devices used by the Fire Department and, in addition, repairs and 
upholsters vehicle seats, interior lining, etc. 

A total of 512 various jobs of this nature were completed during the year. 

Paint Shop 

This sub-shop is responsible for all required vehicle painting and damage 
refinishing and the refinishing of Fire Department ladders. 

It is staffed with 3 permanent car and auto painters. 

The following is a sample of the work completed in this shop: 80 Fire Dept. 
ladders refinished, 527 variou: vehicles touched up or repainted, 274 sets of City 
seal - I.D. numbers and reflective safety stripes installed on vehicles. 

Blacksmith Shop 

This shop performs all of the welding, forging, and general heavy duty metal 
fabrication necessary to repair and outfit fire apparatus, Public Works' trucks, etc. 

Major work consisted of the manufacture of 45 security screens for Police cars, 
16 street cleaning "pick up r ' buggies plus the outfitting of 12 new DPW vehicles for 
special service usage. 

This shop is, as it was during the previous year, entirely staffed with 
limited tenure employees due to: (!) classification change, (2) promotion of 3 
employees to Public Utilities. This is an undesirable situation and it is hoped that 
the near future will see competent permanent employees in this shop. 

- 17 - 




New ambulance built in a "walk in van" chassis by the 
Central Shops for the Emergency Hospital service. 




BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Body and Fender Shop 

This sub-shop is responsible for all body and fender repairs on City vehicles 
and any alterations and modifications necessary on vehicle bodies. Three Body and 
Fender workers are employed. 

A total of 415 accident type vehicle body repairs were made. Of these, 253 
were repaired in the shops and 1 62 were completed by low bid contrac+. 

A noteworthy non-accident type project initiated in this shoo was the develop- 
ment and manufacture of Police patrol car screens. These provide a security divider 
between the front and rear seat of Police cars so that law breakers are transported 
quickly from place of arrest without having to wait for a patrol wagon to respond. 

A major project completed in this shop was the design and outfitting of the 
new "Walk in Van'* type ambulance for the Emergency Hospital service (see illustration) 

This completely outfitted ambulance can accomodate up to einht patients plus 
the driver and steward. It has all the features of a custom unit at a fraction of 
the cost of one purchased completely equipped. 

Fire Hose and Broom Shop 

One Mai ntenance Machinist divides his time inspecting and repairing all fire 
hose and hose fittings and the repair and rebuilding of steel gutter brooms used on 
the mechanical street sweepers. 

This year 26,000 feet of new fire hose was received, inspected, tested, 
numbered and sent out to the various fire engine companies. 

The Machine Shop Division also rebuilt 225 steel gutter brooms for use of the 
Public Works' Street Cleaning Department on their mechanical street sweeper. 

Army Street Station 

This station located at 2323 Army Street in the Dept. of Public Works' main 
yard, provides fuel, lube service and minor repairs to all DPW vehicles working out 
of that area. It operates 5j days per week from 7 a.m. to midnight and is staffed 
with 2 Automotive Servicemen, I Automotive Serviceman Sub-Foreman, Mr. Robert Desmond 
and I Automotive Machinist. 

The past year saw 295,180 gallons of gasoline, 19,200 gallons of kerosene and 
4,620 gallons of oil dispensed from this station. In addition, the following 
vehicles were serviced: 507 heavy duty trucks, 208 light duty trucks, 275 passenger 
vehicles, and 1022 miscellaneous equipment (comDressors, rear motors, etc.). 

Minor miscellaneous repairs, clutch and brake adjustments, tuneups, electrical 
repairs and fields services amounted to 2009 separate jobs. 



- li 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
19th Avenue Service Station 



This station, located on 19th Avenue near Teraval Street, provides service and 
garage facilities for DPW vehicles assigned to the western section of the City. 
Gasoline and oil are dispensed to other City vehicles operating in that area, thereby 
effecting a substantial saving in fuel costs and operators' time. 

54,801 gallons of gasoline and 1980 guarts of oil were dispensed; 58 major 
services were performed on heavy duty trucks and 472 minor services and repairs made. 

Quint Street Service Station 

This station located at Central Shops provides fuel and service to City 
vehicles garaged or operating in the area. In addition, fire apparatus and cars 
receive preventative maintenance and periodic lubeservice. A total of 104,671 
gallons of gasoline was dispensed during the past year. In addition, 989 lube and 
service jobs were performed at this location. 

Aside from these shops and sub-shops, the Central Shops provides for and 
supervises 4 Maintenance i'achinists assigned to the three sewage treatment plants, 
North Point, South East and Richmond-Sunset. These men are constantly engaaed in the 
maintenance and repair of the machinerv of the sewage treatment facilities. 

In addition, one Automotive Serviceman is assigned to the Oept. of Public 
Health Garage, 101 Grove Street and one to the Department of Electricity Garage at 
901 Rankin Street. Minor repairs, lubrications, inspections, and road call service 
are provided by these employees to their assigned flee+s. 

The recommendations made bv John F. Forbes and Company in their recent 
"Survey of the Administration of fotive Equipment' are under study by the Purchasing 
Department, Controller, Chief Administrative Officer and M ayor's office. The con- 
clusions drawn and recommendations agreed upon will be implemented as soon as 
practicable. 

At the reguest of the Board of Supervisors, the Central Shops have undertaken 
a study on the desirability of leasing automobiles for Ci+y use as opposed to the 
present method of outright purchase. 

The results of this study and the conclusions drawn will be resolved early in 
the next fiscal year. 

The Central Shops are hopeful that it will be able to put into effect a firm 
replacement program for City vehicles plus a program of preventative maintenance and 
service. This combination can provide the City with the maximum utilization of its 
fleet at the lowest possible cost. 

Continued progress has been made in effecting collections wherein City owned 
vehicles have been damaged by second parties. 

Over 112 invoices were furnished the various departments. $6,359 was collect- 
ed and returned to the departments' repair funds; S3, 600 was collected from prior 
years' action and returned to the general fund. Total collections amounted to 
$9,959, up from $5,400 collected in 1963-64. Additionally, approximately $18,400 
in claims were turned over to the Delinquent Revenue Bureau for further collection 
effort. lo 



/ 




Sections of Central Tabulating Bureau newly located in 
Controller's Payroll Division. The Division of Central 
Tabulating Bureau located at the Hall of Justice is not 
pictured. 




CENTRAL TABULATING BUREAU 

The Central Tabulating Bureau provides centralized service, available to all 
City and County of San Francisco departments, in machine accounting (IBM). 

The Bureau occupies two locations: City Hall and Hall of Justice. 

The Bureau is administered by a Tabulating Division Supervisor with the 
assistance of a Principal Tabulating Machine Operator and a Senior Tabulating 
Machine Operator. Funds for operating expenses are provided by budget transfers 
and work orders from departments using these services. The total cost for work 
processed during the fiscal year 1964-1965 amounted to $148,791, an increase of 
$6,178 over the previous fiscal year. 



The following tabulation shows a 
two locations of tnis Bureau: 



i st of the personnel and equipment at the 



Pcom 65, City Ha I I 



Room 125, Hal I of Justice 



Personne I 



I Supervisor of Tabulating 
Senior Tabulating Machine Operator I Principal Tabulating Machine Operator 
Tabulating Machine Operators 3 Tabula + ing Machine Operators 

Key Puncn Operator 5 Key Punch Operators 

Equipment 



3 Key Punch Machines 

1 Reproducer-Summary Punch 

2 Accounting Machines 



8 Key Punch Machines 
2 Reproducers 

2 Accounting Machines 

3 Sorting Machines 
2 Col lators 

I Interpreter 



On September 30, 1964 Central Tabulating Bureau moved into a section of 
Controller's Payroll Division. After the move the Bureau was able to use some of 
the Payroll Division's equipment, therefore 2 sorters, I collator and I interpreter 
were released. 



Major Recurring Functions of the Tabulating Section: 



Mun icipal 



Department 
Court 



Function 



Civil Service Commission 



Control ler 



Traffic Citations: 

Calendars, Abstracts, Adjudication Stati sties, Cash, 
Motor Vehicle, Notices, Warrants, Moving Violations, 
Paid Calendar, Missing Tags, Stop and Release 
Dismissals, Group Demonstrations Arrest Index, and 
Miscellaneous Records and Reports 

Salary Standardization Reports, Salary Survey Data 
Analysis, Recruitment and Examination Records 

Budget Statistics, Tabulation of Officials Bonds, 
Canceled Warrant Report, Summary of Unpaid Property 
Taxes, Semi -weekly Encumbrance Posting Reports 
(Purchase Orders), Budget Priority, SJVs, Claims 
Against City, Appropriation Listing for 6400 input 



20 



Department 
Control ler (EDP) 

Purchasing Department 



Tax Col lector 



Registrar of Voters 



CENTRAL TABULATING BUREAU - Continued 

Function 

Miscellaneous and Utilities, Tax - Assessor, Civil 
Service, Retirement, Health Service, Budget, Payroll, 
Pub I ic Works 

Inventories - Equipment and Warehouse Stores Stationery 
Control, Record of Average Use (materials), Fee Tag 
Reports, Purchase Order Registers, Shop Expenditure 
Reports, Vehicle Maintenance Cost Accounting, Contracts 
and other Statistics, Proposal Index, Bid I ndex, Garbage 
Col lection, Service Agreements 

License Tax Accounting: Hotels, Apartment Houses, Food 
Inspection, Pin Ball Machines, etc., Hotel Transient Tax 

Election Officer Payroll 
Election Analysis and Statistics 



Dept. Public Health (Vital) Birth and Death Indexes and Statistics - Monthly and 

Annually, Venereal Disease, T.B. Statistics, Emergency 
Hosp ital 

Budget Statistics, Public Health Field Nursing, Cost 
and Expenditures 



- Central Office 

- SF General Hospital 



- Laguna Honda Hospital 

- Emergency Hospital 

- T. B. Subsidy 

Ai rport 

Bay Area Air Pollution 

Board of Education 

Publ ic Uti I ities 
Heat, Light and Power 



X-ray Statistics, Ward Census Summary, Inventory, 
Discharge Analysis, Cost Accounting, Fee Tags, and 
Purchase Orders 

Cost Accounting, Ward Census, Inventory 

Index 

Patient Accounting - SF Gen. Hospital & Hassler Health H. 

Audit 

Index File and Statistics 

Purchase Order Listings 

Distribution ana Accounting Records of Consumption of 
Gas and Electricity by City and County Departments 



The scope of machine accounting operations performed by the Central Tabulating 

Bureau continues to expand. During the fiscal year the following procedures were 
inaugurated: 

For the Controller Appropriation listing of Discounts Taken 

For the Control ler(EDP) Tape Library, Machine Usage Report 

For the Purchasing Requisition Index, Weekly and Monthly Area Code 

Department Tabulation 



For the Municipal 
Court 



Moving Violation Dismissals - weekl.y Yearly Dismissals 
- 21 - 




Blueprint Section of the Reproduction Bureau, showing in 
part, new alterations finished in April 1965 of Room 50. 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Reproduction Bureau provides a centrally located, wide variety of 
reproduction services available to all City departments. Its operation eliminates 
unnecessary duplication of equipment and employment of specialized personnel by 
other departments. 

Work processed during 1964-65 amounted to $117,500, an increase of $2,000 
over the preceding year. Funds are provided for operation by over 52 departments 
using the services through budget transfers and work orders. 

The Bureau is administered by a Blueprint and Reproduction Manager with a 
staff of ten employees. 

Personnel (Room 50, Basement, City Hall) 

I Blueprint & Reproduction Manager 

I Senior Offset Machine Operator 

I Offset Machine Operator 

I Photo-Lithographer 

I Photograoher - as needed 

1 Senior Blueprint Operator 

2 Blueprint Machine Operators 
I Photostat Operator 

I Photostat Operator - part time 
I Senior Account Clerk 

Equ iprnent 

1 42" Blueprint Machine 

2 42" Ammonia Process Machines 

I 17" x 22" Process copy camera (new) 

I 14" x 17" Offset Duplicating Machine 

I 10" x 14" Offset Duplicating Machine 

1 26" Power Cutter 

2 8?" x 14" Mimeograph Machines 
I 18" x 24" Photostat Machine 

1 18" x 24" Electristatic Printer (prints from microfilm) 

2 Microfilm Machines (I 35mm and I 16mm) 

2 9" x 14" Xerox printers (self-service)- I located in City Hall Annex 

Improvements 

The major alterations of the Reproduction Bureau were completed in April. 
These alterations include: 

Moving of the Blueprint Section from the 5th floor attic to an enlarged 
area in Room 50. 

Adding a new darkroom and installing a new 17 x 22 process copy camera 
replacing an old 1910 model copy camera. 

Increasing the offset and mimeographing section areas. 

Soundproofing and increasing of the office area. 

Relocating of other equipment to increase work area. 

- 22 - 



Major Recurring Functions of the Reproduction Bureau 



Ai I Departments 

Various Departments (20) 

Assessor 

City Attorney 

Board of Supervisors 

Purchasing 

Treasurer 

Recreation and Park 



Public Works, Engineering, 
Bureau of Architecture, 
Recreation & Park, SFUSD 



Public Works, City Attorney, 
SF Unified School District 



Departmental Budget Estimates 

Annual Reports 

Real Property Transfer Records 

Opinions & other Legal Papers 

Calendars and Ordinances 

Bids, Specifications & Purchasing Records 

Microfilm Records of Checks Deposited 

Specifications for Construction, 
Maintenance & Repair of Buildings, 
Parks, and Recreational Facilities 

Contract sets of Blueprints for Construc- 
tion, Maintenance, & Repair of Public 
Buildings, Streets, Sewers, and 
Recreational Faci I ities 

Photography in connection with 

Construction Progress, Earth Slides, 
Accidents, Redevelopment & Planning 

Blueprinting of Block Maps of the City 



Assessor, Public Works, Real 
Estate, Recorder, Tax Collector, and County 
Purchasi ng 

|n addition to the major functions listed above the Bureau performs many 

hundreds of nonrecurring jobs for City departments. The greater part of this work 
is of an urgent nature and deadlines set by ordinance; advertised dates for bids; 
and the normal requirements of departments. These deadlines must be met. 



23 



REPRO D UCTION BUREAU - Continued 

It is proposed to request in October, 1965, funds for the purchase of the 
fol lowi ng: 

I Automatic 10 station staple collator $ 8,700 

I Short Run Offset Press 3,900 

I IBM Selectric Typewriter with extra type 

elements 550 



$13,150 



The press and collator will be used for printing and assembling work now 
sent out or assembled by hand. The typewriter, with an assoriment of type elements, 
will be available for departments preparing copy for the press. The type assortment 
will permit distinctive type styles for titles, section headings, italics, bold face 
emphasis and the like. 

Annual savings are conservatively estimated as follows: 

Departments 

Board of Supervisors $ 750 

City Planning 775 

Department of Public V/orks 

Present Jobs 350 

Construction Specifications (new) 3900 

$5775 

It is submitted that the above savings will justify the purchase of the 
equipment. In addition, it is felt that other departments will be able to make 
economical use of the services. The Purchasing Department is currently studying 
the possibility of using this service, if available, for preparing bids now printed 
by outside f i rms. 



- 24 - 







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APPENDIX 



TABLE NO. 1 
PURCHASE ORDERS PROCESSED 





196 


4-65 


1963- 


-64 






Purchase 
Orders 


Amount 


Purchase 
Orders 




Amount 


General 


16,034 


$ 7,132,198 


16,153 




$ 6,795,847 


Education 


7,578 


3,226,688 


6,756 




3,045,980 


Health 


5,580 


2,941 ,683 


5,066 




2,566,419 


Uti 1 ities 


5,883 


4,556,470 


5,737 




4,688,099 


Totals 


35,075 


$17,857,039 


33,712 




$17,096,345 


Purchases by 
Requests 


Encumbrance 


$10,381,108 






$14,204,233 


Total 




$28,238,147 






$31 ,300,578 



TABLE NO. 2 

EXPENDITURES 

Comparison of expenditures with original budget for all 
operating appropriations except personal services for 1964- 



1965: 



Encumbered & 



Account 

Contractual Services 
4.31 I .200.000 

Material s & Supp I ies 
4.31 I .300.000 

Equipment 
4.315.400.31 I 

Premium - Official Bonds 
4. 315. 812. 31 I 

Premium - Auto Insurance 
4. 315. 813. 31 I 

Membership Dues 
4.31 1.800.000 

Total 



Budqeted 


Expended 


$ 20,958 


$ 


25,268 


14,000 




13,295 


8,684 




7,995 


7,300 




6,166 


43,000 




39,442 


7,436 




5,208 


$101 ,878 


$ 


97,374 




REVENUE 



Surpl us 



$ 705 



.634 



3,558 



2.228 



$8,814 



Deficit 



$4,310 



,310 



Comparison of Revenues with Estimated Revenues 1964-65 





Estimated 


Actual 


Over 




Under 


Account 


Revenue 


Revenue 


Est irr 


ated 


Estimated 


Sale of Documents 


$ 1 ,000 


$ 1,423 






$ 423 


7061 












Minor Sales 


4,000 


7,002 






3,002 


7062 












Sale of Grease 


1 ,700 


1 ,71 1 






1 1 


7621 













Total $ 6,700 



$10,156 



$3,436 



TABLE NO. 3 

S HOP EXPENDITUR ES 

Comparison of expenditures with original budget for all 
appropriations except personal services for 1964-1965: 

1964-65 1963-64 



Object Amount Amount 

Administrative Salaries $ 10,608 $ 9,660 

Wages 548,871 537,012 

Contractual Services 118,606 108,819 

Materials and Supplies 203,835 195,560 

Retirement 6,156 6,694 

Work Orders 91 ,318 85,857 

Total $979,394 $943,602 

Contractual Services 

Original Appropriation $ 85,040 $ 77,582 

By Transfer 43,776 34,190 

$128,816 $111,772 

Less Unexpended $ 10,210 S 2,953 

Expenditure Total $118,606 $108,819 
Materials and Supplies 

Original Appropriation $174,621 $171,502 

By Transfer 35,000 26,877 



Less Unexpended 
Expenditure 



$209,621 $198,379 

5,786 2,819 

Tota I $203,835 $195,560 



DOCUMENTS 

SEP 13 866 

SAN FRANCISCO 
_. . PUBLIC LIBRARY 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
ANNUAL REPORT 



FISCAL YEAR 1965-1966 



September, 1966 



City and County of San Francisco 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



270 CITY HALL 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 94102 



September I , 1966 



Annual Report 
Fiscal Year 1965-66 



Mr. Thomas J. Mel Ion 

Chief Administrative Officer 

289 City Hall 

Dear Mr. Mel Ion : 

The annual report of the Purchasing Department for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1966 is herewith respectfully submitted. 

As stated in detail in the report the department expended $18,888,478 by 
34,785 purchase orders and $19,553,298 by encumbrance requests; maintained 
25 storerooms; sold $55,724 surplus City property and did 7,071 shop jobs 
in the amount of $1,052,339. Tabulating Bureau furnished services in the 
amount of $156,216 and Reproduction Bureau in the amount of $128,486. 

Continued effort is being made by all bureaus to give departments faster 
and better service. 

The problems associated with operating with temporary help continue to be 
a matter of concern particularly at shops and in stores. 

The following statements on the activities of the department for past 
fiscal year answer the specific inquiries of the Mayor to all departments, 
dated August 8, 1966. 

1. There were no capital programs in progress during the year. 

2. Recommendations on the activities of the department, as stated 
in the annual report include: 

a. Establish specification and control system for buying on a 
ful I time basis. 

b. Establish vehicle management system to provide for trouble- 
free operation of vehicle fleet including an appropriate 
replacement program. 

c. A complete study of Purchasing Department procedures by 
EDP personnel to determine desirable applications of data 
processing methods. This study Is scheduled to begin in 
October. 



*\ 



. 



Mr. Thomas J. Mellon September I, 1966 

Chief Administrative Officer 



3. The comparison of expenditures for all appropriations other than 
those for personal services with original budget appropriations 
for 1965-1966 is given in the appendix, annual report. Funds 
for departments' activities are obtained mainly by transfers from 
budget appropriations of other departments. 

4. The comparison of revenues with revenues estimated in the budget 
of 1965-1965 is given in the appendix, annual report. 

5. The budget appropriations of other departments for automotive and 
other equipment services, and for tabulating and reproduction, 
should be increased yearly to compensate for the increase in work 
required, and for steadily increasing labor and material costs. 

6. The statistics on work accomplished are given in the annual report. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your confidence in me 
and support and to express my appreciation for the cooperation given me by 
my fellow workers in the Purchasing Department. 

Very truly yours, 

T. F. CONWAY ' 
Purchaser of Supplies 



ANNUAL REPORT 

PURCHAS I NG DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



September I , 1966 



The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and contractual 
services for all departments for the City and County, including city-owned utilities, 
and the San Francisco Unified School District; repairs and maintains automotive and 
other equipment for the various departments, except Public Utilities, and for the 
School District as requested; operates a central tabulating and reproduction bureau 
for departments requiring its services; transfers to other departments for use or 
sells equipment and supplies no longer useful to any department of the city; maintains 
a perpetual inventory of equipment in the various departments; and operates central 
stores of the Purchasing and various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by the Shops on 
equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of Buying on new products, 
specifications and prices. 

PERSONNEL 

Employments totaled 208 permanent in five bureaus. The Organization Chart is 
shown in the Appendix. 

Supervisory - June 30, 1966 
Admi ni strati ve 

T. F. Conway - Purchaser of Supplies 
H. H. Shi man - Secretary 

Bureaus 

Buy i nq 

J. C. Gavin - Assistant Director of Purchasing & Services - Bureau Head 

C. P. Webster - Senior Purchaser 

J. A. Frantz - Coding Supervisor (acting) 

Equipment and Supplies 

J. H. 3eck - Stores and Equipment Supervisor - Bureau Head 

E. G. Chapman - Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor (acting) 

Personnel and Accounts 

M. J. Wehrle - Chief Clerk - Bureau Head 
R. A. Davis - Principal Clerk 



Shops 



A.M. Flaherty - General Superintendent of City Shops - Bureau Head 
E. A. Rames - Assistant Superintendent City Shops 



Bureaus - Continued 



Tabul ati nq 



Helen Egliht - Tabulating Division Supervisor (acting) - Bureau Head 
J. W. Bender - Tabulating Division Supervisor (Temporary assignment to EDP 
staff) 



>roduction 



T. J. Ryan 



Blueprint and Reproduction Manager - Bureau Head 



The valued services of the following were separated from City employment 
through retirement or death after years of meritorious accomplishment: 



Name 



Reti red 



Herman A. Kahler 
Helen M. Toretta 
Eugene W. Lineham 
Albert A. Rotbert 



Posi tion 



Assistant Purchaser 
General Clerk Typist 
Automotive Machinist 
Automot i ve Mach i n i st 



Aporox. Years 
City Service 



Date 



35^ 


12-1-65 


18 


1-18-66 


25i 


2-1-66 


25i 


2-1-66 



Died 



George B. Tracy 



Accountant 

WORK ACCOMPLISHED 



18 



3-17-66 



The work accomplished in the fiscal year, described in more detail under the 
separate bureaus remained substantially the same over-all as in 1964-65. 

Recapitulation is as follows: 



Bureau 


Unit 


1964-1965 


1965-1966 


Buying 


Purchase Orders 

Amount 


$17 


35,075 
,857,039 


34,785 
$18,888,478 




Encumbrance Requests 
Amount 


$10 


,381 ,108 


$19,553,298 


Stores & Equipment 


Surplus Sales - Amount 
Major Stores operated 


$ 


36,990 
1 1 


$ 55,724 
1 1 


Shops 


Job Orders 
Expenditures 


s 


7,602 
979,394 


7,071 
$ 1,052,339 


Tabulating 


Services rendered - Amount 


$ 


148,791 


$ 156,216 


Reproduction 


Services rendered - Amount 


$ 


1 17,500 


$ 128,486 



- 2 - 



GENERAL COMMENTS 

The past year, while not marked by material changes in facilities, procedures 
and methods saw steady progress being made in many areas. 

Additional expansion of the use of travelling requisitions continues to 
reduce paper work by eliminating repetitive typing and processing. 

Continued increase in products and services under term contracts has been of 
material benefit to the Purchasing and using departments. 

The Materials and Supplies Code is now applied to all purchase orders. 
Anticipated studies by EDP personnel scheduled to begin in October will undoubtedly 
bring new uses to light. 

The specification and control section formed for studies which cannot be 
done by buyers without impairing their work functioned on an intermittent basis 
because of lack of personnel. The need for expanding this function to full time 
is clearly apparent in view of rapid technological advances in processes, equipment, 
and materials and supplies. 

Use of Friden Flexowriters for bids, automated purchase order writing and 
blanket orders continued. New functions are continually beinq performed. This 
method has been found to be of immeasurable value because original source data can 
be reused from tapes. 

Storekeeping records and control were materially improved because of more 
direct supervision, improved methods, and departmental cooperation. The bureau, 
however, has been handicapped because of lack of personnel and the extended use of 
temporary employments. 

Central Shops at 800 Quint Street continued to function efficiently. As 
stated elsewhere, work continues on vehicle management procedure. 

The Hall of Jus tice Service Station has been highly successful in serving 
the Police and other departments at the Hall of Justice and some City Hall vehicles. 
It is expected that the services provided will be expanded particularly greasing, 
minor adjustments, tires, and inspection for the proposed preventative maintenance 
program. 

The Purchasing Department is actively participating in the EDP program. The 
Tabulating Division Supervisor is now on leave assigned to the EDP project and a 
number of department employees took general courses in this subject. 



- 3 - 



BUREAU OF BUYING 

This Bureau procures materials and supplies, equipment, insurance, contracts 
for services, for all city departments and the San Francisco Unified School District. 
Except for term contracts based on estimated quantities, all buying starts with 
receipt of requisition from the using department. Included in or incidental to the 
procurement function are the following: (outlined in detail in a previous report) 

I . Buying - Bids and Awards 

Preparation of bids including contractual and technical requirements: 
evaluation of bids; and award of bids. 

I I . Buying - Related Functions 

Analysis of records of average use; maintenance of specification file; 
new term contracts; and review of procedures. 

PERSONNEL 

The Buying Division is headed by the Assistant Director of Purchasing and 
Services and includes II assistant purchasers. The clerical staff, under the 
Bureau of Personnel and Accounts, is engaged in typing, mailing, opening and 
tabulating bids, maintaining bid index and specifications file, and typing contracts. 
Funds for some of these employments, both buying and clerical, are provided by other 
departments. 

Detailed employments are as follows: 

I Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 

1 Senior Purchaser 
7 Purchasers 

2 Purchasers (Printing) 
f Assistant Purchaser 

OPERATIONS 

Purchasing work is assigned on a commodity basis with allowance for items 
of a special nature or in cases where seasonal peaks or vacation period make it 
advisable to temporarily deviate from this policy. 

Periodic meetings of the buying staff permit the exchange of ideas, 
explanation of improved procedures and generally keep the assistant purchasers 
informed as to the overall progress and problems. 

Every effort is made to process requisitions as rapidly as possible but 
delays occur due to lack of personnel, inadequate information furnished with requisi- 
tions, and failure of departments to submit requisitions promptly for equipment items 
that are to be grouped for purchase for purposes of standardization and economy. 

In preparing requisitions, departments are requested to furnish information 
that will indicate a standard of overall quality and usefulness suitable for actual 
use requirements and permit competition as required by the Charter and Administra- 
tive Code. A new form was devised for this puroose making it easier for departments 
to furnish desirable information for bid purposes. 

- 4 - 



BUREAU OF BUYING - Continued 
OPERATIONS - Continued 

As time is available personnel are assigned to: 

1. Review specifications, forms and procedures. 

2. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing additional term 
contracts for articles and services where desirable. 

The need for a separate section to expand the above services is apparent if 
the department is to most efficiently and effectively perform its purchasing 
functions. This work is now being done on an intermittent basis as time is avail- 
able. Every effort should be made to procure a full time employment for this work. 

Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into for various service and 
commodities in general use by several departments or recurring use by a department. 
The main advantages are elimination of the time lag resulting when individual bids 
are requested and elimination of the costs involved in individual bids. 

New term contracts initiated during the year include: 

1. Laundry Service (Hassler Health Hospital) 

2. Fl uosi I icic Aci d 

3. Coverall Rental Service for Sewage Treatment Plants 

4. Hose and Hose Fittings for Municipal Railway 

5. Oxygen, Liquid, Therapy, U.S. P. 

6. Printed Traffic Citations (Police) 

7. Soil Sterilization for San Francisco International Airport 

Some purchases or contracts of an unusual nature include the following: 

1. Mobile Communication Van - For use as an emergency Mobile Communications 
Center for the Department of Electricity 

2. Scoreboard Timer = SFUSD 

3. Synchronous Generator for new Moccasin Powerhouse - Hetch Hetchy Water 
Project 

4. Butterfly Valves - Water Department 72" an d 54"' 

5. Furnishing and installing Master T.V. Antennas and Distribution Systems 
for the School department 

6. Butterfly Valves 60" and 42 M - Water Department 

7. Venturi Meter - Totalizer - Manometer - Water Department 

8. Furnishing and installing Sound and Protection System for the M. H. 
de Young Memorial Museum 

9. Settees - San Francisco International Airport Waiting Room 



- 5 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS 

Muriel J. Wehrle - Chief Clerk, Bureau Head 
Robert A. Davis - Principal Clerk 

This Bureau consists of 25 employees. It is supervised by a Chief Clerk with 
a Principal Clerk in charge of the Bid Section. These permanent employments were 
supplemented by temporary clerk typists as needed to expedite purchase order 
preparation when work load was unusually heavy as extra typing is required on 
purchase orders due to various codes mentioned below. 

Sales of Charters, Codes and other documents amounted to $18,760. 
Discounts earned amounted to $67,632 or 97.3? and discounts unearned $1,870 or 2.1%. 
Comparable figures for the previous fiscal year were $62,612 or 98.7$ and discounts 
unearned $830 or 1.3$. 



Travel i ng 

Requisitions: Expanded to include Central Office of Health Department 
effective March I, 1966. 

Friden Equipment: Flexowriter and Computyper use expanded. In addition to 
our own use of these machines, the Civil Service 
Commission used the Flexowriter for Salary Standardization 
Ordinance preparation and the Computyper to proof the 
tapes punched on Flexowriter. 

Tabulation of Microfilming of bids on Contract Proposals and Quotations 
Bids: continued. 

Requisition For past several months we have had a daily register run 
Register: to supplement the cumulative weekly register. This has 

proved helpful in locating requisitions in process of 

purchase order preparation. 

Bid Index: Is being continued. 

Vendor Index: Continued. 

Codes on Purchase We are continuing the use of Vender Location Code, Buyer 
Orders: Code, and Commodity Code. 

Preparation of For the past several months, purchase order sets have been 
Purchase Orders: made up on a random basis instead of being segregated by 
departments, as heretofore. This has enabled us to 
expedite the issuance of purchase orders. 



- 6 - 



CODING DIVISION 



The material and supplies code has been adopted (subject to routine 
changes and additions) for full use with purchasing documents. 

The Codification Catalog has been printed and distributed and meetings 
have been held with the personnel of the various departments who will use the 
code. The catalog is based on the format established by the Armed Forces Supply 
Center and has a nine digit code arranged as follows: 

353-06-0001. The first digit, 3, indicates Material and Supplies and is 
the first digit of the Object of Expenditure, "O.E. ,: . (If the article is 
classed as equipment the first digit will be 4.) The next two digits, 53, 
are the Group Numbers and last two digits of the O.E. The fourth and 
fifth digits are the Cias? Digits, and the last -four digits are the Item 
Numbers. The City of San Francisco Supply Classification Code consists 
of 60 Groups of the 99 Groups that are available, and uses 542 out of the 
999 Classes. This leaves 39 Groups and 457 Classes available for future 
expansion. Each Group is published as a separate catalog due to the 
fact some departments will require only four or five groups; others will 
require 40 or more. Each group is punched for a loose leaf binder and 
stapled. 

The Cataloging Handbook contains instructions on how to use the new code, 
a breakdown of the approved unit abbreviations, the index of material to proper 
group numbers and a commodity classification breakdown into group and class 
numbers. This catalog will be furnished to all departments requisitioning 
material . 

The Codification Catalogs have item code numbers for material stocked by 
the various departments of the City as well as items that have been ordered 
periodically the past year or so. These catalogs will be kept up to date by 
issuing a supplement to each group as items are added or deleted. 



- 7 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT 



The Bureau of Stores and Eaulpment operates and maintains a central warehouse 
and storerooms in various City departments; receives and issues materials, supplies 
and equipment for all deDartments of the City and County of San Francisco; ana makes 
miscellaneous emergency purchases for the account of the various agencies. This 
Bureau arranges for the sale of and sells surplus and obsolete personal property 
belonging to the City, exchanges equipment between departments, maintains a perpetual 
inventory of all materials purchased for the City and County of San Francisco and 
makes periodic checks of such property. The Bureau maintains control of the entire 
automotive fleet, including the listing, insurance and the reporting of all accidents. 

The following locations are staffed and operated by the Division of Sales, 
Inventory and Stores: 



Name and Location 



T yP e 



Amount of Inventory 



Central Warehouse 



15th & Harrison 



Dept. Public Works - 2323 Army St. 



Stationery 
Janitorial SupD I ies 
4000 Cases Foodstuffs 
Miscellaneous Furniture 
Pipe, etc 



Water Department 
Hetch Hetchy 
SF Int* I. Airport- 
Municipal Rai I way 



Health Department 



Social Services 



- 1990 Newcomb Ave. 

- Moccasin, Cal i f . 

- South San Francisco 

- 24th & Utah Sts. and 2 sub-stores 
General Store ) 
Washington & Mason) 

- Elkton Yard (Bond Fund) 

- Potrero and one sub-store 

- SF General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

- Laguna Honda Hospital , 7th & Dewey 

- Hassler Hospital, Redwood City 

- Single Mens' Rehabilitation Center 

Redwood City 

- 901 Rankin Street 

- Golden Gate Park 



83 

433 
43 
15 
78 



,514 
.105 



,955 
,814 
,366 



178,322 



Dept. Electricity 

Recreation & Park 

Sheriff 

Central Shop Store - Hal I of Justice Garage (Sub-store) 

* Storage only - Amount included with departmental inventory 



293 

41 

96 

195 

220 

38 

4 
40 
19 
64 
29 



,266 
,135 
,773 
,571 
,067 
,316 

,718 
,661 
,291 
,256 
.210 



PERSONNEL 



The Sales, Inventory, and Stores Divisions are staffed by the following 
Stores and Equipment Supervisor 
Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 
Senior Clerk-Stenographer 
Senior Clerk-Typist 
Inventory Clerks 
Senior Storekeepers 

Storekeepers (plus I Storekeeper on work order) 
Assistant Storekeepers 
Laborer 



Total 



I 
I 

I 

2 
I I 
21 



47 



- 8 - 




San Francisco Water Department S+oreroorr - 1990 Newcomb Avenue 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 
SALES DIVISION 

Twenty-five sales were conducted during the fiscal year under the authority 
of Section 88 of the Charter. Sales activities included legal research into various 
aspects of different sales, preparation of sales, inviting interested buyers to bid, 
opening and awarding of bids, collecting and depositing all money received from 
buyers with the City Treasurer and keeping records of correspondence relative to the 
sales. 

The total revenue from the sales of 1965-1966 was $55,724. A general break- 
down of the sales is as follows: 

Auto & Trucks $ 35,306 



X-Ray Film 


1 


,772 


Coin Counting Machine 




150 


Auto Vision Equipment 


1 


,808 


Brass Meter Parts 


2 


,065 


Safes 




85 


Transformers 




150 


Scrap Metal 


2 


,778 


Waste Paper 


2 


,802 


Grease & Bones 


3 


,411 


Sacks & Containers 




574 


Sand 


4 


,688 


Miscellaneous Sales 




135 


Total 


$ 55. 


,724 



Selling of used automobiles by public sale was our biggest source of revenue. 
We sold 53 trucks and 163 passenger cars. 

INVENTORY DIVISION 



The accumulation of various waste materials, such as Tab Cards, Waste Paper, 
Scrap Metal piles, various items of equipment no longer useful to the City and the 
sale of vehicles is a function of this Division. Meetings with various City depart- 
ment heads and moving agents for co-ordination, set up procedure and secure estimates 
continues to negotiate through this department. Transfer of surplus and rehabilitated 
office equipment and vehicles between City departments, realized a saving of approx- 
imately $27,000 - inventory book value. 

This division has the assignment of maintaining the inventory of alt City 
eauipment and investigating and reporting on lost or damaged equipment. 

During the fiscal year, through the co-operation of the Department of Social 
Services, a job training crew consisting of eight men and two women typists was 
detailed to making a physical check of equipment, affixing decals, comparing descrip- 
tion and recording same on field sheets. This information is now being processed and 
recorded by the Purchaser's Tabulation Bureau. On completion, the inventory finding 
will be presented to the respective department heads for acknowledgment and acceptance. 
Thus far, thirty-one departments have been completed and four more are in the final 
stages of completion. 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 

INVENTORY DIVISION - Continued 

The automobile inventory controlled by use of the IBM system continues to be 
an important function of this division. This method provides practical and flexi- 
bility in dealing with acquisition, assignment, licensing, insurance and final 
disposition of the City's pufomcbile fleet valued at over $2,500,000, and consists 
of approximately 3,200 vehicles. Insurance coverage of $100/100,000 Bodily Injury 
Liability and $100,000 Properry Damage Liability is in effect and covers all City 
vehicles with the exclusion of police, fire, ambulances, and Municipal Railway 
vehicles, which are emergency vehicles or revenue vehicles. 

STORES DIVISION 

Personnel wise the stores haven't faired too badly. All positions have been 
filled and we have been very fortunate in securing very caoable men in the Limited 
Tenure openings. We are operating with 6 LT appointments who will be replaced 
shortly with permanent Civil Service employees. 

After several years in trying to obtain a fork lift for the storekeepers at 
the Elkton Yard Storeroom the Municipal Railway has now budgeted for one. 

Fluorescent lighting was installed in the Central Warehouse office giving 
much needed lighting for the office personnel. 

A new stationery catalog has been prepared for the use of departments drawing 
stationery from the Central Warehouse. The items will be coded and all departments 
will be asked to use these code numbers when requisitioning stationery. This will 
aid departments in receiving their specific needs taking the guesswork out in 
determing what is requested as heretofore. 

GENERAL 

Lost time, brought about by injuries on the job, has been kept at a minimum. 

The services of two very capable employees were lost during the year - one 
Storekeeper and one Inventory Clerk. 

One of the Senior Storekeepers attended the American Transit Association 
Conference held in Coronada, California. At this conference he gave a talk on the 
Municipal Railway's EDP system of stock control and procedures for recording. 




Department of Electricity Storeroom - 901 Rankin Street 



BUREAU QP SHOPS 

Section 88 of the Charter of the City and County of San Francisco provides 
that the Purchaser of SupDlies shall have charge of a central garage and shop for 
the repair of City and County equipment. 

As a result the Central Shops and allied facilities provide all necessary 
mechanical maintenance and repair service for all City departments and bureaus 
(excepting Public Utilities). In addition, it is the responsibility of this Bureau 
to inspect, appraise and make recommendations on all City owned vehicles contemplated 
for replacement; aid the various departments in the writing of specifications; to 
receive and aDprove all new vehicles delivered to the City, and to outfit and preoare 
these vehicles for service. 

Administration and major repair facilities are located at the Central Shops, 
800 Quint Street. Other installations are: Golden Gate Park Shop, providing main- 
tenance for Recreation and Park Department equipment; Hall of Justice Service 
Station, where fuel and lubricants are provided for Police and other City cars, 
and inspection and 19th Avenue Station; Health Department Garage; and Department of 
Electricity Yard. 

The Central Shops have four main maintenance shop areas; I. Automobile, 
2. Truck, 3. Fire Apparatus, 4. Machine, and the following auxiliary shops: 
Blacksmith, Pattern, Paint, Hose. Upholstery, Body and Fender, Tire, and Service 
Station. In addition to the responsibilities for the maintenance and repair of 
mechanical equipment in school buildings, sewage plants, pumping stations, public 
buildings, etc., 1912 motorized units of the City owned fleet are maintained, an 
increase of 36 over last year. These vehicles are valued at over 6.75 million 
do I lars. 

The Bureau is staffed with 94 budgeted employments as follows: 

I City Shops General Superintendent 

I Assistant Superintendent City Shops 

3 Automotive Machinist Foreman 

I Automotive Machinist Sub-Foreman 

I Automotive Mechanic Sub-Foreman 

I Maintenance Machinist Foreman 

9 Maintenance Machinist 

22 Automotive Machinist 

9 Automotive Mechanic 

27 Automotive Servicemen 

1 Automotive Serviceman Sub-Foreman 

2 Pattern Makers 

3 Car & Auto Painters 

3 Body & Fender Workers 
3 Blacksmith 

Welder 

Up ho I sterer 

Chauffeur 

Senior Account Clerk 

Accountant 

Account Clerk 

Clerk Typ ist 




HEAVY DUTY TRUCK SHOP 



A LARGE TRUCK BRAKE DRUM BEING MACHINED TO RESTORE 
PEAK BRAKING EFFICIENCY FOR SURE STRAIGHT LINE STOPS. 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

In addition, I General Storekeeper and I Storekeeper are assigned to the 
Central Shops to procure, store and issue stock and supplies. 

This past year saw two veteran employees of the Central Shops retire after 
many years of faithful service to the City. 

Eugene Lineham, Automotive Machinist 
Albert Rotbert, Automotive Machinist 

In addition to these retirements, we suffered the loss of George B. Tracy, 
Accountant, who passed away suddenly March 17, 1966. 

The zeal and skills of these former employees will not easily be replaced. 

AUTOMOBILE SHOP 

This shop staffed with 7 Automotive Mechanics, 2 Automotive Servicemen and 
I Automotive Mechanic Foreman, Mr. Roy Didier, is responsible for the repair and 
maintenance of 607 City owned passenger cars. 

A total of 2584 jobs were completed by this shop. 

52 new Police cars, 5 new Fire Department cars plus 43 various passenger type 
automobiles were received, inspected and outfitted for service. 

In addition, 13 rebuilt engines were installed, 29 engines were major over- 
hauled, 147 minor engine jobs were performed. 

361 brake jobs were performed which include safety inspection of wheel 
cylinders, brake lines, front end wear and leaking grease seals, the front wheel 
bearings are also packed and adjusted. 

45 automatic transmissions were overhauled, 198 were serviced and adjusted, 
28 were resealed. 39 stick transmissions were overhauled and 80 new clutches were 
instal led. 

157 road calls and tows were made. A new Sun Electronic Engine Tester enabled 
the Shop to perform more accurately the 482 tune ups. 

264 major and minor body and fender jobs were repaired. 

FIRE APPARATUS SHOP 

This shop is responsible for the maintenance, repair, and service of 223 
units of heavy duty fire apparatus. 

The staff consists of 9 Automotive Machinists, I Automotive Serviceman, and 
I Automotive Machinist Foreman, Mr. Leonard Counihan. 

During the fiscal year, a total of 904 shop jobs were completed, and 2466 
field service calls made. 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

FIRE APPARATUS SHOP - Continued 

The following partial list of completed jobs is typical of the work done in 
this shop: 

15 major engine repair or overhauls 
57 minor engine repair or overhauls 

31 transmissions repaired or overhauled 

87 engine tune uds 

96 brake system repairs 

26 radiators repaired 

41 fire pump repairs 

33 aerial ladder repairs 

23 clutches replaced 

86 clutches adjusted or repaired 

16 gas tanks repaired 

Major projects performed by this shop consisted of the complete rehabilitation 
of the Fire Department heavy tow truck. This vehicle was modernized - new equipment 
was installed for its safe and efficient use and the vehicle was completely repainted. 

Two (2) new Hi-Ex Foam Units were purchased and installed on mobile trailer 
units. Provisions were made on these units to carry the foam tube and twelve 5- 
gallon cans of concentrated foam to make the unit a self sufficient package. 

One (I) San Francisco International Airport Crash Truck was rebuilt. All 
corroded and damaged body sections were replaced, foam and booster tanks were 
rebuilt, enclosed cab was fabricated and installed and water piping and valves were 
replaced. Vehicle was then repainted and returned to service at the Airport. 

TRUCK SHOP 

This shop is responsible for the maintenance and repair of 688 varied pieces 
of heavy duty type automotive equipment used by the various City departments. 

A total of 2108 jobs were completed during the past fiscal year. The shop is 
staffed with 10 Automotive Machinists, 2 Automotive Servicemen under the supervision 
of Foreman Auto Machinist James Elliot. 

Painting and rehabilitation program continues. On trucks, this consists of 
steam clean-sand blast, repair body damage and paint completely. With this program 
we were able to extend the useful service life of 15 DPW vehicles. 

Two new traffic painting trucks were completely outfitted for service. These 
modern design vehicles include compressor, large paint pot, convenient air outlets 
and stencil racks for fast and efficient street traffic painting. 

A total of 36 various type trucks were received, inspected for compliance of 
specifications and outfitted for service during the past fiscsl year. 



13 



3UREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

MACHINE SHOP 

This section of the Central Shops is staffed by 10 Maintenance Machinists and 
I Maintenance Machinist Foreman whose function is to repair, reconstruct and maintain 
all machinery, tools, and equipment. This service is extended to all City depart- 
ments as well as to the Board of Education. 

During the year a total of 735 separate job descriptions were processed 
through this division of Central Shops. 

A few of the major jobs completed during the year were: 

1. Design and construction of floor finish testing machines for the Purchas- 
ing Department. 

2. Park Department - Complete over-haul and reconstruction of the mechanical 
section of the merry-go-round at Golden Gate Park. 

3. Fire Pumping Station #2 - Reconstruct and renew the carbon seals on the 
generator sets. 

4. The complete over-hauling of the main sewer pumps at the Marina Pumping 
Station. 

5. Opera House - Reconstruction and over-hauling the sump pumps located in 
the Opera House. 

6. De Young Museum - Complete over-hauling of the ventilating fans at the 
de Young Museum. 

Sewage Treatment Plants -Comprising the Southeast, North Point, and the 
Richmond-Sunset Treatment Plants. 

The men assigned to these plants repair, rebuild, and manufacture 
parts for various pumps, blowers, filters, driers, and other related 
machinery peculiar to the operation of sewage treatment. 

Two men are assigned to the Southeast Plant and one each to the North 
Point Plant and Richmond-Sunset Plants -all Maintenance Machinists under 
the direction and supervision of the Central Shops. 

The purpose of this function is to repair and maintain these plants 
for continuous around the clock operation. 



14 




MACHINE SHOP. 



Section of large pump housing being remachined to 
original specifications after rebuilding damaged areas. 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

RECREATION AND PARK AUTOMOTIVE SHOP 

This shop, located in the Maintenance Yard area of Golden Gate Park, is 
staffed with 3 Automotive Machinists, I Automotive Serviceman and I Automotive 
Machinist Foreman, Mr. Ainslee Kerri . 

Maintenance and repairs were performed on the following pieces of equipment 
operated by the Recreation and Park Department; Passenger cars, trucks of al I types, 
tractor mowers, tractor loaders, miscellaneous - as D6 Caterpillar Tractor-Cat, 
grader-chipper, sweepers, air compressors, pumps, etc., power operated mowers, hand 
mowers, miscellaneous pieces such as brush choppers, spikers, spray machines, roto 
tillers, and power saws. 

During the past fiscal year a total of 740 jobs were completed on automotive 
equipment and over 670 jobs on various power and hand mowers, cultivators, edgers, 
roto tillers, aerators, etc. 

In an effort to extend the useful life of the park equipment and provide 
greater safety: I) 2 Toro gang mower tractors were rebuilt with independent suspen- 
sion front ends to provide four wheel brakes and more positive steering. 2) I Worth- 
ington gang mower was reoowered with a surplus 6 cylinder engine. 3) the heavy 
tractor carrier was rebuilt to conform with California State Safety and Vehicle Codes. 

HALL OF JUSTICE SERVICE STATION 

This unit of the Central Shops is located adjacent to the Hall of Justice and 
provides fuel and service to Police Department vehicles, and fuel and oil to other 
City departments. The station is operated 7 days a week from 7 a.m. to midnight. 
It is staffed with 9 Automotive Servicemen, 2 Automotive Mechanics, and I sub-Foreman, 
Mr. Howard Gettle. 

The convenient location of this station for City vehicles and the accelerated 
usage of Police vehicles have made this station a high volume distribution point for 
auto fuels and lubricants. 



The past year shows the following services performed: 



Gasoline dispensed 486,866 gallons 

Oil dispensed 17,215 quarts 

Tow jobs I ,393 

Tires changed (new and recaps) 2,917 
Batteries (new or recharged) 518 
Grease and service jobs 1,880 

Mechanical repairs 5,176 

Motorcycle Service: 

Oi I changes 671 

Tires (new or recaps) 245 

Batteries (new or recharged) 234 
Repairs 431 

The preventative maintenance service and inspection program continues to pay 
dividends in a better operating Police fleet with reduced down-time due to mechanical 
failure. Volume of gas and oil dispensed continues to rise with a corresponding 
increase of fleet mileage driven. 

- 15 _ 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
19th AVENUE SERVICE STATION 



This station, located on 19th Avenue near Taraval Street, provides service 
and garage facilities for OPW vehicles assigned to the western section of the City. 
Gasoline and oil are dispensed to other City vehicles operating in that area, thereby 
effecting a substantial saving in fuel costs and operators' time. 

53,395 gallons of gasoline and 1864 guarts of oil were dispensed; major 
services were performed on heavy duty trucks and 98 minor services and repairs made. 

QUINT STREET SERVICE STATION 

This station located at Central Shops provides fuel and service to City 
vehicles garaged or operating in the area. In addition, fire apparatus and cars 
receive preventative maintenance and periodic lub service. A total of 171,024 
gallons of gasoline was dispensed during the past year and 803 lube and service jobs 
were performed at this location. 

ARMY STREET STATION 

This station located at 2323 Army Street in the Department of Public Works' 
Main Yard, provides fuel, lube service and minor repairs to all DPW vehicles working 
out of that area. It operates 5| days per week from 7 a.m. to midnight and is staffed 
with 2 Automotive Servicemen, I Automotive Serviceman Sub-Foreman, Mr. Robert Desmond, 
and I Automotive Machinist. 

The past year saw 300,000 gallons of gasoline, 19,200 gallons of kerosene and 
13,200 quarts of oil dispensed from this station. In addition, the following 
vehicles were serviced: 468 heavy duty trucks, 260 light duty trucks, 208 passenger 
vehicles, and MOO miscellaneous equipment (compressors, rear motors, etc.). 

Minor miscellaneous repairs, clutch and brake adjustments, tuneups, electrical 
repairs and field services amounted to 2079 separate jobs. 

Aside from these Shops and Sub-Shops, one Automotive Serviceman is assigned 
to the Department of Public Health Garage, 101 Grove Street, and one to the Depart- 
ment of Electricity Garage at 901 Rankin Street. Minor repairs, lubrications, 
inspections, and road call service are provided by these employees to their assigned 
fleets. 

BLACKSMITH SHOP 

In this sub-shop is performed all of the welding, forging, and general heavy 
duty metal fabrication necessary to repair and outfit fire apparatus, Public Works' 
trucks, etc. 

Major work consisted of the manufacture of 30 security screens for Police cars, 
10 street cleaning "pick up" buggies, outfitting of 21 new DPW vehicles for special 
service usage plus over 960 various jobs on vehicles and equipment. 

This shop is, as it was during the previous years, entirely staffed with 

limited tenure employees due to: (I) classification change, (2) promotion of 3 

employees to Public Utilities. This is an undesirable situation and it is hoped that 
the near future will see competent permanent employees in this shop. 




BLACKSMITH AND FABRICATION SHOP 



Sawing metal sections for Police Radio Car Security 
Screens, prior to assembly in new Radio Cars. 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

PATTERN AND LADDER SHOPS 

This sub-shop, staffed with 2 Patternmakers, is responsible for the repair 
and manufacture of all wood products required in the operation of the Central Shops, 

74 Fire Department ladders repaired and overhauled 
8 Patterns manufactured 
12 Fire ladders manufactured 

Plus over 346 other items manufactured or repaired for 
various City departments. 

UPHOLSTERY SHOP 

This sub-shop with I Upholsterer manufactures and repairs leather goods, 
belts, covers, safety devices used by the Fire Department and, in addition, repairs 
and upholsters vehicle seats, interior lining, etc. 

A total of 362 various jobs of this nature were completed during the year 
and, in addition, 489 various items were manufactured or repairer. 

PAINT SHOP 

This sub-shop is responsible for all required vehicle painting and damage 
refinishing and the refinishing of Fire Department ladders. 

It is staffed with 3 permanent car and auto painters. 

The following is a sample of the work completed in this shop: 76 Fire 
Department ladders refinished; 510 various vehicles touched ud or repainted; 
249 sets of City seal, I.D. numbers and reflective safety stripes installed on 
vehicles. 

HOSE AND BROOM SHOP 

The Hose and Broom Shop is a sub-section of the Machine Shop. This function 
is staffed by one Maintenance Machinist. This section is charged with the 
inspection, repair and distribution of all fire hose as well as the repair and 
maintenance of hose of all types used in other departments. 

During the year 32,500 feet of new fire hose was inspected, tested, labelled 
and distributed to the various fire houses. 

Over 7500 feet of in-service fire hose was inspected, repaired, and sent 
back to the fire companies. 

Another service rendered in this sub-section is the reconstruction and the 
refilling of gutter broom cores used on the various mechanical street sweepers 
used throughout the City. 



17 




PATTERN AND LADDER SHOP 



Applying the final check to a newly manufactured 
ladder for the flre department. note newly manufactured 
Pompier Ladders, left foreground. 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

BODY AND FENDER SHOP 

This sub-shop is responsible for all body and fender repairs on City 
vehicles and any alterations and modifications necessary on vehicle bodies. Three 
Body and Fender workers are employed. 

A total of 436 accident type vehicle body repairs were made. Of these, 275 
were repaired in the shops and 161 were completed by low bid contract. In addition, 
various radiator repairs and vehicle body modifications were made. 

* * # # 
Two detailed studies were made by the Central Shops this past year. 

One, titled "Automobile Leasing Study", November 1965, covered the question 
of the merits of leasing as opposed to our present method of purchase of passenger 
type automobiles for City and County use. 

Briefly, it concluded that leasing offered us little advantage and no dollar 
saving; and recommended that we continue purchasing our vehicles. 

The second study, "Replacement Recommendations", March 1966, concluded that 
our present method of replacement was lacking in the modern concept, that most 
vehicles were kept in the fleet too long (6 year average age) and that this resulted 
in excessive maintenance cost and downtime. 

It was recommended that we establish a firm replacement policy based on the 
lowest overall cost for the entire fleet operation. 

The Central Shops are hopeful that it will be able to put into effect a firm 
replacement program for City vehicles plus a program of preventative maintenance and 
service. This combination can provide the City with the maximum utilization of 
its fleet at the lowest possible cost. 

Continued progress has been made in effecting collections wherein City owned 
vehicles have been damaged by second parties. 

Ower 135 invoices were furnished the various departments. $12,380 was 
collected and returned to the departments' repair funds; $7080 was collected from 
prior years' action and returned to the General Fund. Total collections amounted 
to $19,460, up from $9959 collected in 1964-65. Additionally, approximately 
$12,600 in claims were turned over to the Delinquent Revenue Bureau for further 
collection effort. 



CENTRAL TABULATING BUREAU 

The Central Tabulating Bureau provides centralized service, available to all 
City and County of San Francisco Departments, in machine accounting (IBM). 

The Bureau occupies two locations: City Hall and Hall of Justice. 

The Bureau is administered by a Tabulating Division Supervisor with the 
assistance of a Principal Tabulating Machine Operator and a Senior Tabulating Machine 
Operator. Funds for operating expenses are provided by budget transfers and work 
orders from departments using these services. The total cost for work processed 
during the fiscal year 1965-1966 amounted to $156,216, an increase of $7,425 over the 
previous fiscal year. 

The following tabulation shows a list of the personnel and equipment at the 
two locations of this Bureau: 

Room 65, City Hal I Room 125, Ha I I of J ustice 

Personnel 

I Supervisor of Tabulating 

I Senior Tabulating Machine Operator I Principal Tabulating Machine Operator 

3 Tabulating Machine Operators 3 Tabulating Machine Operators 

I Key Punch Operator 5 Key Punch Operators 

Equipment 

3 Key Punch Machines 8 Key Punch Machines 

1 Reproducer-Summary Punch 2 Reproducers 

2 Accounting Machines 2 Accounting Machines 

3 Sorting Machines 
2 Col lators 
I Interpreter 

Major Recurring Functions of the Tabulating Section : 

Department Function 

Municipal Court Traffic Citations: 

Calendars, Abstracts, Adjudication Statistics, Cash, 
Daily Citations, Motor Vehicle, Notices, Warrants, 
Moving Violations, Paid Calendar, Missing Tags, Stop 
and Release Dismissals, Moving Violation Dismissals - 
Weekly, Yearly Dismissals and Miscellaneous Records 
and Reports. 

Civil Service Commission Salary Standardization Reports, Salary Survey Data 

Analysis, Recruitment and Examination Records. 



- 19 



Department 



Control ler 



Control ler (EDP) 



Purchasing Department 



Tax Col lector 



Registrar of Voters 



CENTRAL TABULATING BUREAU - Continued 

Function 

Budget Statistics, Tabula"! ion of Officials' Bonds, 
Cancelled Warrant Report, Summary of Unpaid Real 
Estate and Personal Property Taxes, Semi -weekly 
Encumbrance Posting Reports (Purchase Orders), Budget 
Priority, SJVs, Appropriation Listing for 6400. 

Miscellaneous and Utilities, Tax - Assessor, Civil 
Service, Retirement, Health Service, 8udget, Payroll, 
Public Works, Machine Usage Report. 

Inventories - Equipment and Warehouse Stores Stationery 
Control, Record of Average Use (materials), Fee Tag 
Reports, Purchase Order Registers, Shop Expenditure 
Reports, Vehicle Maintenance Cost Accounting, Contracts 
and other Statistics, Proposal Index, Bid Index, 
Garbage Collection, Service Agreements, Requisition 
Index, Weekly and Monthly Area Code Tabulation. 

License Tax Accounting: Hotels, Apartment Houses, Food 
Inspection, Pin Ball Machines, etc., Hotel Transient 
Tax. 

Election Officer Payrol I 
Election Analysis and Statistics 



Dept. Public Health (Vital) Birth and Death Indexes and Statistics - Monthly and 

Annually, Venereal Disease, T.B. Statistics, Emergency 
Hospital . 



- Central Office 

- SF General Hospital 

- Laguna Honda Hospital 

- Emergency Hospital 

- T. B. Subsidy 

Ai rport 

Bay Area Air Pollution 

Board of Education 



Budget Statistics, Public Health Field Nursing, Cost 
and Expenditures. 

X-ray Statistics, Ward Census Summary, Inventory, 
Discharge Analysis, Cost Accounting, Fee Tags, and 
Purchase Orders. 

Cost Accounting, Ward Census, Inventory 

Index 

Patient Accounting - San Francisco General Hospital 
and Hassler Health Hospital 

Audit 

Index File and Statistics 

Purchase Order Listings 



20 



CENTRAL TABULATING BUREAU - Continued 



Department 

Pub I ic Uti I ities 
Heat, Light and Power 



Function 

Distribution and Accounting Records of Consumption of 
Gas and Electricity by City and County Deprtments. 



The scope of machine accounting operations performed by Central Tabulating 
Bureau continues to expand. During the fiscal year the following procedures were 
inaugurated: 



For the Control ler 

For the Control ler (EDP) 

For the Purchaser 

For the Ai rport 

For the Health Department 



Reproduce and list Delinquent Real Estate Taxes, 
Appropriation and Work Order Punching for 6400. 

Process and List Reports of Machine Time for Computor 
Room, Process Juror List, Certified List and Juror 
S I i ds for Superior Court, and Various Statistical 
Reports for Safety Counci I . 

Labels, Mailing, Appropriation Allowance for Gas and 
Oil, Telephone and Telegraph, Scavenger Service and 
Street Telephone Directory. 

I nventory 

SF Hospital Admissions, Central Office Patient Census. 



Miscellaneous one time jobs for various departments. 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Blueprint and Reproduction Department provides reproduction services, 
namely Photography, Offset Printing, Mimeographing, Photostating, Blueprinting and 
Electrostatic Copier Printing, to all City Departments. 

Work performed during 1965-66 amounted to $128,486, an increase of $10,986 
over 1964-6?. 

Funds were provided from 65 departments through Budget Transfers and Work 
Orders. 

The Bureau is administered by a Blueprint and Reproduction Manager with a 
staff of ten employees. 

Personnel (Room 50, Basement, City Hall) 

Blueprint and Reproduction Manager 

Senior Offset Machine Operator 

Offset Machine Operator 

Photo-Lithographer 

Photographer - as needed 

Senior Blueprint Operator 

Blueprint Machine Operators 

Photostat Operator 

Photostat Operator - part time 

Senior Account Clerk 

Equipment 

1 42'' Blueprint Machine 

2 42" Ammonia Process Machines 
I 1 9" x 23" Process copy camera (new) 
I 14" x 17" Offset Duplicating Machine 
I 10" x I4 ;: Offset Duplicating Machine 

1 26" Power Cutter 

2 8|" x 14" Mimeograph Machines 
I 18" x 24" Photostat Machine 

1 18" x 24" Electrisiatic Printer (prints from microfilm) 

2 Microfilm Machines (I 35mm and I I6MM) 

2 9" x 14" Xerox printers (self-service) I located in City Hall Annex 

I Power Driven Book Stapler 

IMPROVEMENTS 



The only equipment added during the year was one power-driven book stapler. 
Major Recurring Functions of the Reproduction Bureau 

All Departments Departmental Budget Estimates 

Various Departments (20) Annual Reports 
Assessor Real Property Transfer Records 

City Attorney Opinions & other Legal Papers 

- 22 - 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU - Continued 
Major Recurring Functions of the Reproduction Bureau - Continued 

Board of Supervisors Calendars and Ordinances 

Purchasing Bids, Specifications & Purchasing Records 

Treasurer Microfilm Records of Checks Deposited 

Recreation and Park Specifications for Construction, Maintenance & Repair 

of Buildings, Parks, and Recreational Facilities 

Public Works, Engineering, Contract sets of Blueprints for Construction, Mainten- 
Bureau of Architecture, ance & Repair of Public Buildings, Streets, Sewers 
Recreation & Park, SFUSD and Recreational Facilities 

Public Works, City Attorney, Photography in connection with Construction Progress, 
SF Unified Schooi District Earth Slides, Accidents, Redevelopment & Planning 

Assessor, Public Works, Blueprinting of Block MaDS of the City and County of 
Real Estate, Recorder, San Francisco 
Tax Collector, Purchasing 

In addition to the major functions listed above the bureau performs many 
hundreds of nonrecurring jobs for City departments. The greater part of this work 
is of an urgent nature and deadlines set by ordinance; advertised dates for bids; 
and the normal requirements of departments' deadlines which must be met. 

STUDIES 

Because of the increasing workload, careful consideration should be given to 
the purchase of the following labor-saving equipment: 

I Automatic ten-station collator $8700 
I Short run paper plate offset press 4000 

Collating is presently assembled by hand at 2000 copies per hour. A collator 
assembles 30,000 per hour. 

Over 500 new aluminum plates costing $6 each were made last year. A short 
run paper plate costing under $1 each, could be used on a great many of these 500 
plates with a new offset press. 



- 23 - 



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APPENDIX 



TABLE NO. L 



PURCHASE ORDERS PROCESSED 



1965-66 



1964-65 



Purchase 
Orders 



Amount 



Purchase 
Orders 



Amount 



Genera 1 






14,743 


$ 6,365,643 


16,034 


3 7,132,198 


Education 






8,753 


4,634,538 


7,578 


3,226,688 


Health 






5,826 


3,483,747 


5,580 


2,941 ,683 


Uti lities 






5,453 


4,404,550 


5,883 


4,556,470 




Tota 


s 


34,785 


$18,888,478 


35,075 


$17,857,039 


Purchases 
Requests 


by Encum 


b ranee 


319,553,298 




310,331 ,108 




Tota 






$38,441 ,776 




$28,238,147 



TABLE NO. 2 

EXPENDITURES 

Comparison of expenditures with original budget for all 
operating appropriations except personal services for 1965-1966: 



Account 


B 


jdqeted 


Encumbered 
& Expended 


Contractual Services 
5.31 1.200.000 


$ 


21 ,042 


$ 


22,280 


Material s & Suopl ies 
5.31 1.300.000 ' 




14,885 




15,858 


Equi pment 
5.311.400.000 




7,570 




7,471 


Premium - Official Bonds 
5. 315. 812. 31 1 




6,433 




6,426 


Premium - Auto Insurance 
5. 315. 813. 31 1 




43,000 




39,652 


Membership Dues 
5.311.800.000 




5,214 




5,209 


Total 


$ 


98,144 


$ 


96,896 








REVENUE 



Surp I us 



Deficit 
$1 ,238 

973 



$ 99 



3,348 



$3,459 



Comparison of Revenues with Estimated Revenues 1965-66: 



52,21 I 



Account 


Estimated 
Revenue 


Actual 
Revenue 


Over 
Estimated 


Under 
Estimated 


Sale of Documents 
7061 


S 1 ,000 


S 2,390 




$ 1 ,390 


Minor Sales 
7062 


4,000 


5,455 




1 ,455 


Sales of Grease 
7621 


1 ,700 


3,41 1 




1 ,723 



Total $ 6,700 



$1 I ,256 



$ 4,568 



TABLE NO. 3 
SHOP EXPENDITURES 

Comparison of expenditures with original budget for all 
appropriations except personal services for 1965-1966: 



Object 

Administrative Salaries 

Wages 

Contractual Services 

Materials and Supplies 

Reti rement 

Work Orders 



Total 



1965-66 


1964-65 


Amount 


Amount 


$1 1 ,292 


$10,608 


600,131 


548,871 


145,637 


1 18,606 


190,844 


203,835 


6,570 


6,156 


97,855 


91,318 


$1,052,339 


$979,394 



Contractual Services 
Original Appropriation 
By Transfer 

Less Unexpended 
Expenditure 

Materials 3nd Supplies 
Original Appropriation 
By Transfer 

Less Unexpended 
Expenditure 



Total 



$ 92,107 


$ 85,040 


59,129 


43,776 


151 ,236 


128,816 


5,599 


10,210 


$145,637 


$1 18,605 



$186,703 

18,000 

$204,703 

13,859 

$190,844 



$174,621 

35,000 

$209,621 

5,786 

$203,835 



\ 



Auvann onen«i 



swnooa 



^^^BURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OFSAN FRANCISCX) 



^ 



NNUAL REPORT 



FISCAL YEAR 1966-67 



CAN TRANCICCO 
PUBLIC L 



September, 1967 



City and County of San Francisco 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 CITY HALL 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 94102 



September I I . 1967 



Annual Report 
Fiscal Year 1966-67 



Mr. Thomas J . Mel Ion 

Chief Administrative Officer 

289 City Hal I 

Dear Mr. Mel Ion : 

T.ie annual report of the Purchasing Department for the fiscal year endinq 
June 30, 1967 is herewith respectfully submitted. 

As stated in detail in the report the department expended $19, 597,^18 by 
35,669 purchase orders and $23,695,209 by encumbrance requests; maintained 
25 storerooms; sold $58,591 surplus City property and did 7,655 shop jobs in 
the amount of $1,108,289. Reproduction Bureau furnished services in the 
amount of $141 ,650. 

Continued effort is being made by bureaus to qive departments faster 
and better service. 

The problems associated with operatinq with temoorary helo continue to be 
a matter of concern in all bureaus Darticularly as regards key jobs. 

The following statements on the activities of the department for past 
fiscal year answer the specific inquiries of the Mayor to all departments, 
dated Auqust 7, 1967: 

1. There were no capital programs in progress during the year. 

2. Recommendations on the activities of the deDartment, as stated 

in the annual report include: 

a. Establish specification and control system for buying on a full 
time basis. 

b. Continue expansion of the vehicle management system. With your 
assistance and the cooperation of the budget reviewing 
authorities significant progress has been made in a preventive 
maintenance program. No additional personnel was provided for 
the 1967-68 fiscal year for understandable reasons. During 
1967-68 it is proposed to study the possibilities of establish- 
ing reserves for more timeJy vehicle purchases. 



Mr. Thomas J. Mel Ion September 11,1967 

Chief Administrative Officer 



c. Study of Purchasing Department procedure by EDP personnel 

is expected to continue at an accelerated oace and, hopefully, 
on a ful I time basis. 

d. Funds will be sought for purchase of badly needed equipment 
for the Reproduction Bureau. Savings resulting from the use 
of this equipment would amortize its cost within 2 years. 

3. The comparison of expenditures for all appropriations ©ther than 
those for personal services with original budget appropriations 
for 1966-67 is given in the appendix, annual report. Funds 

for departments' activities are obtained mainly by transfers from 
budget appropriations of other departments. 

4. The comparison of revenues with revenues estimated in the budget 
of 1966-67 is given in the appendix, annual report. 

5. The budget appropriations of other departments for automotive and 
other equipment services, and for tabulating and reproduction, 
should be increased yearly to compensate for the increase in work 
required, and for steadily increasing labor and material costs. 

6. The statistics on work accomplished are given in the annual report. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your continuous 
support and to express my appreciation for the cooperation given me by my 
fel low workers in the Purchasing Department. 



Very tru.ly yours, 



T. F. CONWAY 
Purchaser of Supplies' 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PURCHAS I NG DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and contractual 
services for all departments for the City and County, including city-owned utilities, 
and the San Francisco Unified School District; repairs and maintains automotive and 
other equipment for the various departments, except Public Utilities, and for the 
School District as requested; operates a central reoroduction bureau for departments 

requiring its services; transfers to other departments for use or sells equipment 
and supplies no longer useful to any department of the city; maintains a perpetual 
inventory of equipment in the various departments; and operates central stores of 
the Purchasing and various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by the Shops on 
equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of Buying on new products, 
specifications and prices. 

PERSONNEL 



Employments totaled 198 permanent in four bureaus. The Organization Chart 
is shewn in the Appendix. 



Supervisory - June 30, 1967 



Administrative 



T» F. Conway - Purchaser of Supplies 

H, H. Shiman - Secretary 

Bureaus 

Buy i nq 

J. C. Gavin - Assistant Director of Purchasing & Services - Bureau Head 

G. A. Clarke" - Senior Purchaser 

C. J. Morrissey-Coding Supervisor (acting) 

Equipment and Supplies 

J. H. Beck -Stores and Equipment Suervisor - Bureau Head 

J. A. Frantz -Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor (acting) 

"gcsonal and Accounts 

M. J. Wehrle -Chief Clerk - Bureau Head 

R. A. Davis -Principal Clerk 



Shops 



A. M. Flaherty -General Super intendnent of City Shops - Bureau Head 
E. A. Rames -Assistant Superintendnent City Shops 

-I- 



Bureaus - Continued 
Reproduction 

T. J. Ryan - Blueprint and Reproduction ? 'ananer - Bureau Head 

The valued services of the following were separated from City employment 
throuah retirement or death after years of meritorious accomplishment. 

Apdtox. Years 
Name Position City Service Date 

Edward G. Chapman Stores and Equipment 39 8/1/66 

Assistant Supervisor 

Edward W. Sheehan Automotive Machinist 

A ins lee J. Kerri Automotive f, achinist 
Foreman 

Carl L. Knouf Automotive Machinist 

Edward L. Hansen Auto Body & Fender Worker - 

Frieda Math i as Gen. Clerk-Tvpist 

WORK ACCOMPLISHED 

The work accomplished in the fiscal year, described in more detail under 
the separate bureaus remained substantially the same over-all as in 196^-66. 

Recapitulation is as fellows: 

Bureau 

Buy inq 



Stores 8, Equipment 



22 


9/10/66 


23 


12/1/66 


24 


3/1/ 57 


21 


3/1 1/67 


10 


5/ i /67 



Shops 



Reproduction 



Unit 




^65-1966 


1966-1967 


Purchase Orders 
Amount 


SI8 


34,785 
,888,478 


35,667 
$19,597,918 


Encumbrance Requests 
Amount 


$19 


,553,298 


S23,695,209 


Surplus Sales - Amount 




55,724 


$ 58,591 


Major 4 Stores operated 




1 1 


1 1 


Job Orders 
Exnend i tures 


$ 1 


7,071 
,052,339 


7,647 
S 1 ,108,289 


Services rendered - 

Amount 


S 


I2P,486 


$ 141,650 



-2- 



GENERAL COMMENTS 



The past year, while not marked by material changes in facilities, 
procedures and methods, saw steady progress being made in many areas. 

Additional expansion of the use of travelling requisitions continues to 
reduce paper work by eliminating repetitive typing and processing. 

Continued increase in products and services under term contracts has been 
of material benefit to the Purchasing and using departments. Studies by EDP 
Personnel will undoubtedly bring new uses to light. 

The specification and control section formed for studies which cannot be 
done by buyers without impairing their work functioned on an intermittent basis 
because of lack of personnel. The need for expanding this function to full time 
is clearly apparent in view of rapid technological advances in processes, eguipment, 
and materials and supplies. 

Use of Friden Flexowriters for bids, automated purchase order writing and 
blanket orders continued. New functions are continually being performed. This 
method has been found to be of immeasurable value because original source data 
can be reused from tapes. 

Storekeeping records and control were materially improved because of more 
direct supervision, improved methods, and departmental cooperation. Permanent 
employees have replaced limited tenure employees except in two instances. 

Central Shops at 800 Quint Street continued to function efficiently. As 
stated elsewhere, work continues on vehicle management procedure. 

The Hall of Justice Service Station continues to be highly successful in 
serving the Police and other departments at the Hall of Justice and some 
City Hall vehicles. It is expected that the services provided will be expanded 
particularly greasing, minor adjustments, tires, and inspection for the 
proposed preventative maintenance program. 

The Purchasing Department is actively participating in the EDP program. 



—3- 



BUREAU OF BUYING 

This Bureau, procures materials and supplies, equipment, insurance, 
contracts for services, for all city departments and the San Francisco Unified 
School District. Except for term contracts based on estimated quantities, all 
buying starts w9th receipt of requisition from the usino department. Included 
in or incidental to the procurement function are the fol lowing : (outl ined in 
detail in a previous report) 

I . Buying - 3ids and Awards 

Preparation of bids includinq contractual and technical requirements; 
evaluation of bids; and award of bids. 

I I . Buy inn - Related Functions 

Analysis of records of average use; maintenance of specification file: 
new term contracts; and review of procedures. 

PERSONNEL 

The buying division is headed by the Assistant Director of Purchasing and 
Services and includes II assistant purchasers. The clerical staff, under the 
Bureau of Personnel and Accounts, is engaged in typinq, mailing, open i no and 
tabulating bids, maintaining bid index and specifications file, and typinq 
contracts. Funds for some of these employments both buying and clerical, are 
provided by other departments. 

Detailed employments are as follows: 

I Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 

1 l-Senior Purchaser 
7 Purchasers 

2 Purchasers (Printing) 
I Assistant Purchaser 

.. OPERATIONS 



Purchasing work is assigned on a commodity basis with allowance for items 
of a special nature or in cases where seasonal peaks or vacation period make it 
advisable to temporarily deviate from this policy. 

Periodic meetings of the buying staff permit the exchange of ideas, 
explanation of improved procedures and generally keep the assistant purchasers 
informed as to the overall progress and problems. 

Every effort is made to process regui sit ions as rapidly as possible but 
delays occur due to lack of personnel, inadequate information furnished with 
requisitions, and failure of departments to submit requisitions promptly for 
equipment items that are to be grouped for purchase for purposes of 
standardization and economy. 



-4- 



BUREAU OF BUYING - Continued 



OPERATIONS - Continued 



In oreparing requisitions, departments are requested to furnish information 
that will indicate a standard of overall quality and usefulness suitable for 
actual use requirements and permit comoetition as reauired by the Charter and 
Administrative Code. A new form was devised for this purpose making it easier 
for departments to furnish desirable information for bid purooses. 

As time is available personnel are assigned to: 

1. Review specifications, forms and procedures. 

2. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing additional 
term contracts for articles and services where desirable. 

The need for a separate section to expand the above services is apparent 
if the department is to most efficiently and effectively perform its purchasing 
functions. This work is now beinq done on an intermittent basis as time is 
available. Every effort should be made to orocure a full time employment for 
this work. 

Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into for various service 
and commodities in general use by several departments or recurring use by a 
department. The main advantaqes are elimination of the time lag resulting when 
individual bids are requested and elimination of the cost involved in individual 

bids. 

New term contracts initiated during the year include: 

1. Window cleaning for S.F. Water Dept. (Water Treatment Plant, Sunolj_ 

2. Photocopy Machine Supplies, (Heat Process) 

3. Pipe - Cast Iron and Ductile Iron 

4. Television Receivers and Accessories 

5. Pamphlet - Printed - (Contract Proposal) 

6. Television Receivers and Antennae Service 

7. Weed Control (S.F. Internatioal Airport) 

8. Liquid Hydrof I uosi I icic Acid 

9. Helicopter Transportation 

10. Sodium Silicate, Liauid 

11. Tie Rods (Water Dept.) 

12. Pipe and Tubing (Plastic) 



•5- 



BUREAU OF BUYINft - Continued 
OPERATIONS - Continued 

Some purchases or contracts of an unusua'l nature include the foi lowing: 

1. Rehabilitate Telephone Intercom. - SFUSn 

2. Television Accessories for Closed Circuit T.V. - SFUSD 

3. Oi I Circuit Breakers for New Moccasin Powerhouse - Hetch Hetchy 

4. Truck Outfitting - Dept. of Electricity 

5. Communications System - Police Dept. 

6. Cabinet and Metal Work for Mobile Communications Van - Dept. of 
Electricity 

7. Tester Unit (Soil Moisture & Density) - DeDt. of Public Works 

8. Resuscitation System - Dept. of Public Health 

9. Monitor System for Intensive Coronary Care Center - Dept. of 
Pub I ic Health 

10. Apparatus, Airoort Rescue Fire Fightinq 

11. Pulse Tone Coded Squelch System - Deot. of Electricity 
12. Butterfly Valve - Hetch Hetchy 



-6- 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS 

Muriel J. Wehrle - Chief Clerk, Bureau Head 
Robert A. Davis - Princioal Clerk 

Travel ing 

Requisitions: Expanded to include Public Library effective 
January I , 1967 

Term Contracts: Use expanded 

Friden Equipment: Additional bids and Purchase Orders were done on 

these machines during the past year. We have reached 
capacity of Comoutyper use for Traveling Requisitions and 
are almost at Computyper capacity for other purchase 
orders. 

Tabulation of Microfilming of bids on Contract Proposals and 
bids: Quotation continued. 

Reguisition Cumulative weekly and monthly as well as daily runs of 
Register- this register have been continued. It is indispensable 
in locatinq requisitions processed for Purchase Order. 

Vendor Index: Continued 

Codes on Purchase Use of Vendor Location Code, Buyer Code, and Commodity 
Orders; Code continued. 

Bid Index- Continued 

Preparation of We are continuing to make up sets of Purchase Orders 
Purchase Orders: on a random basis as we have found this an excellent 
way to expedite issuance of purchase orders. 

This bureau Is supervised by a Chief Clerk with 23 permanent employees. 
Permanent employments were suoplemented by temoorary clerk typists as needed to 
expedite purchase order preparation when work load was unusually heavy. The use 
of the codes referred to above increases the typing work load. Nondiscrimination 
Provisions of Sec. I2B.2, Ord. No. 261-66 (Chap. I2B, S.F. Admin. Code) has 
entailed much additional work. Purchase Order forms were revised to incorporate 
this provision, in order to expedite purchase orders; however, the additional 
work is still required in connection with bid preparation. 

Sales of Charters, Codes, and other documents amounted to SI 9, 168. 

Discounts earned amounted to $87,323.22 or 99.2? and discounts unearned 
$724.40 or 0.8/'. Comparable figures for the previous fiscal year were $67,631.65 
or 97.3?; and discounts unearned $1,870.06 or 2.7?. 



-7- 



CODING DIVISION 

The Coding Division, under the Bureau of Buying, continues 
the development of the material and supplies coding system, now in use 
by all requisitioning deDartrnents. 

Constant changes and additions are being made in the code catalogs 
by the Coding Division. The departments affected by these changes are 
notified, where possible. Revised code catalogs and a new improved material 
index are planned for the future. When the above mentioned publications 
become available , all departments requisitioning material will receive 
copies. 

At our request, various departments have sent personnel to our 
division for Dersonal instruction. They are instructed in the correct 
procedures, oertaining to the use of the coding system, when writing requisitions 
for material and supplies. We favor this action and have plans for future 
instruction. Noticeable improvement in writing requisitions by various 
departments receiving above mentioned instructions has been noted by the 
coding division. 

For closer control and supervision of the coding system the item 
identification cards have been transferred from the tabulating division to 
the coding division. 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT 

The Bureau of Stores and Equipment operates and maintains a central 
warehouse and storerooms in various City departments; receives and issues 
materials, supplies and equipment for all departments of the City and County 
of San Francisco; and makes miscellaneous emergency purchases for the account 
of the various agencies. This Bureau arrang ;s for the sale of and sells 
surplus and obsolete personal prooerty belonging to the City, exchanges equip- 
ment between departments, maintains a Daroetiai inventory of all materials 
purchased for the City and County of San Fraicfsco ar.d inventory of all 
materials purchased for the City and County cf San Francisco and makes periodic 
checks of such property. The Bureau maintain; control of the entire automotive 
fleet, including the listing, insurance and tie reportinq of all accidents. 

The following locations are staffed aid operated by the Bureau of Stores 
and Equipment. 

Name and Location Type Amount cf Inventory 

Central Warehouse - 15th K. Stationery $ 11,432 

Harrison Janitorial SuDplies 3,780 
4000 Cases Fcodstuffs 

Misc. Furniture * 

Pipe, etc. * 

Dept. Public Works -2323 Army St. 110,675 

Water Department -1990 Newcomb Ave. 548,193 

Hetch Hetcy -Moccasin, Calif. 41,958 

S.F. Int'l Airport -So. San Francisco 21,114 

Municipal Railway -24th & Utah Sts. and 149,937 
2 sub-stores 
General Store) 

Washington & Mason) 267,023 

-Elkton Yard (Bond Fund) 35,522 

-Potrero and one sub-store 95,738 

Health Dept. -S.F. General Hospital, 209,428 

22nd 3, Potrero 

-Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th & Dnwey 158,268 

-Hassler Hospital, Redwood City 33,550 

Social Services -Single Mens' Rehabilitation Cetter, 5,238 

Redwood City 

Dept. of Electricity, 901 Rankin Street 34,861 

Recreation and Park-Golden Gate Park 24,001 

Sheriff 6P ,420 

Central ShoD Store -Hall of Justice Garage (Sub-Store) 30,606 

* Storage only - Amount included with departmental inventory 



-9- 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



PERSONNEL 



The Sales, Inventory and Stores Division are staffed by the following 



TOTAL 



I Stores and Equipment Supervisor 

I Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

I Senior Clerk-Stenoqraoner 

1 Senior Clerk-Typist 

2 Inventory Clerks 

II Senior Storekeepers 

21 Storekeepers (plus I Storekeeper on work order) 

8 Assistant Storekeepers 

I Laborer 
47 



SALES DIVISION 

Twenty-five sales were conducted durinq the fiscal year under the 
authority of Section 88 of the Charter. Sales activities included legal 
research into various aspects of different sales, preparation of sales, 
inviting interested buyers to bid, opening and awarding of bids, collecting 
and depositing al I money received from buyers with the City Treasurer and 
keeoing records of correspondence relative to the sales. 



The total revenue from the sales of 1966-67 was $58,591 
breakdown of the sales is as follows - 



A general 



Auto and Trucks 


$ 


27,747 


Sacks and Conta 


ners 


547 


Grease and Bones 


4,503 


Waste Paper and 


Tab Cards 


2,258 


X -Ray Fi Im 




6,396 


Mattresses 




400 


Food Trays 




192 


Cable 




2,128 


3lock Books 




104 


Scrap Metal 




6,806 


Sand 




4,940 


Mi seel laneous 




179 


Hose 




2,391 


TOTAL 


$ 


58,591 



-10- 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 
INVENTORY DIVISION 



This division has the assignment of maintaininq the inventory of all 
City equipment and investigating and reporting on lost or damaged equipment. 

The accumulation of various waste materials, such as Tab Cards, Waste 
Paper, Scrap Metal piles, various items of equipment no longer useful to the 
City and the sale of vehicles is a function of this Division. Meetinqs with 
various City department heads and moving agents for co-ordination, set up 
procedure and secure estimates continues to negotiate through this department. 
Transfer of surplus and rehabilitated office equipment and vehicles between 
City departments, realized a saving of approximately $32,000 - inventory book 
va I ue . 

Through the co-operation of the Department of Social Services, a job 
training crew consisting of six men and two women typists was detailed to 
making a physical check of equipment, affixing decals, comparing description 

and recording same on field sheets. On completion, the inventory finding is 
presented to the respective department heads for acknowledgment and acceptance. 

At this time, the inventory crew is checking and recording the Social 
Services equipment records. 

The automobile inventory controlled by use of the IBM system continues 
to be an imoortant function of this division. This method orovides practical 
and flexibility in dealing with acquisition, assignment, licensing, insurance 
and final disposition of the City's automobile fleet valued at over 517,300,000 
and consists of approximately 3,200 vehicles. Insurance coverage of $100/100,000 
Bodily Injury Liability and $100,000 Property Damage Liability is in effect and 
covers ail City vehicles with the exclusion of police, fire, ambulances and 
Municipal Railway vehicles, which are emergency vehicles or revenue vehicles. 



•I I- 




Laguna Honda Hospital Storeroom. 
375 Laguna Honda Blvd. 



BUREAU OF STORES AMD EQUIPMENT - Continued 



STORES DIVISION 



Personnel wise the stores haven't faired too badly. All but two 
of the limited tenure appointments have been filled with permanent Civil 
Service employees. 

A modern, efficient storeroom was completed at Hetch -Hetchy Project, 
Moccasin, California. Inventory is controlled by the use of IB M system. 

The services of two very capable employees were lost during the year 
one Storekeeper and one Assistant Storekeeper. 

A fork lift truck has been added to the equipment used by the 
storekeeper, Department of Public Works Yard, 2323 Army Street. 



GENERA L 

Two employees have completed an 8 hour course on automobile safety, 
sponsored by the National Safety Council Driver Improvement Program. 



Lost time, brought about by injuries on the job, has been kept at 
a minimum. 



The Stores and Equipment Supervisor and Assistant Stores and Equipment 
Supervisor have joined the Bay Area Storekeepers Association whose main 
function is to collect and disseminate information of interest and benefit 
to its members, including inventory control and materials handling methods, 
information on storage equipment, products and their uses, sources of supply 
and channels of distribution. 




Recreation & Park Department Storeroom, 
3rd Avenue & South Drive 



BUREAU OF SHOPS 

Section 88 of the Charter of the City and County of San Francisco provides 
that the Purchaser of SuDDlies shall have charge of a central garage and shop for 
the repair of City and County eauipment. 

As a result the Central Shops and allied facilities provide all necessary 
mechanical maintenance and repair service for all City departments and bureaus 
(excepting Public Utilities). In addition, it is the responsibility of this 
Bureau to inspect, appraise and make recommendations on all City owned vehicles 
contemplated for replacement- aid the various deoartments in the writing of 
specifications; to receive and approve all new vehicles delivered to the City, 
and to outfit and prepare these vehicles for service. 

Administration and major repair facili+ies are located at the Central 
Shoos, 800 Quint Street. Other installations ere: Golden Gate Park Shop, 
providing maintenance for Recreation and °ark Department equipment-, M all of 
Justice Service Station, where fuel and lubricants are provided for Police 
and other City cars, Army Street Station providing fuel and preventive main- 
tenance service for DPW vehicles; as well as the 1 0th Avenue Station: Health 
Department Garage; and Department of Electricity Yard. 

The Central Shops have four main maintenance shop areas; I. Automobile, 
2. Truck. 3. Fire Apparatus, 4. ''achine, and the following auxiliary shops: 
Blacksmith, Pattern, Paint, Hose, Upholstery, Body and Fender, Tire, and 
Service Station. In addition to the responsibilities for the maintenance 
and repair of mechanical equipment in school buildings, sewage plants, pumping 
stations, public buildings, etc., 2012 motorized units of the City owned fleet 
are maintained, an increase of 87 over last year. (NOTE: Of these 87 units - 
42 were additions to the fleet and 45 were in the fleet but not included in 
previous Central Shoo inventories). These vehicles are valued at over 6.75 
mi I I ion dol I ars. 

The Bureau is staffed with 102 budgeted employments. See organization 
chart. 

This past year saw five veteran employees of the Central ShoDS retire 
after many years of faithful service to the City. 

Edward L. Hansen, Body and lender ,,1 an 
Ainslee J. Kerri , Auto Machinist Foreman 
Carl L. Knouf, Auto ■ ? 'achini st 
Edward W. Sheehan . Auto Machinist 
Lloyd P. Speers, Auto Machinist 



reo laced. 



The zeal and skiWs of these former employees will not easily be 



-I3- 




MASTER VEHICLE INVENTORY FILE - CENTRAL SHOPS 



THIS FILE IS CONSTANTLY BEING UPDATED AS NEW OR REPLACEMENT 
VEHICLES ENTER THE CITY FLEET AND REFLACED VEHICLES ARE RE- 
MOVED FROM SERV ICE. 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

AUTOMOBILE SHOP 

This shop, staffed with 7 Automotive Machanics, 2 Automotive 
Servicemen and I Automotive Mechanic-Foreman, Mr. Roy Dldier, is responsible 
for the repair and maintenance of 624 City owned passenger cars and pickuo 
trucks. 

A total of 2788 jobs were completed by this shop. 

189 new and replacement automobiles were processed through this 
shop for inspection, acceptance and outfitting prior to assignment to the 
using departments. 

The efficient operation of this shop's staff has Dermitted us to 
absorb the greater work load of this fiscal year. We are, however, fast 
approaching the maximum fleet growth that this repair area can handle with 
its seven machanics. 

A partial listing of completed jobs include, 42 engines rebuilt 
and overhauled, 382 brake jobs performed which include safety inspection 
of wheel cylinders, brake lines, front end wear and leaking grease seals. 

6! automatic transmissions were overhauled, 223 were serviced and 
adjusted, 27 were resealed. 35 stick transmissions were overhauled and 
67 new clutches were installed. 

A new Bear front end and wheel aliqnment rack was installed 
enabling the shop to reduce tire wear and to decrease accident probability 
due to faulty and worn front ends. 

327 major and minor body and fender jobs were completed. 

Cost of passenger car collision type accidents totaled $49,458 
for the fiscal year. 



■14- 




WHEEL ALIGNER RACK - CENTRAL SHOPS 



FRONT WHEELS BEING CHECKED FOR PROPER ALIGNMENT. PROVIDES 
FOR A SAFER OPERATING VEHICLE AND DECREASED TIRE WEAR. 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

TRUCK SHOP - 

This shoo is responsible for the maintenance and repair of 
684 varied pieces of heavy duty type automotive equipment used by the 
various City departments. 

A total of 1,736 jobs were completed during the past fiscal year. 
The shoo is staffed with II Automotive Machinists, 2 Automotive Serviceman 
under the supervision of Foreman-Automotive Machinist, Joseph Frisella. 

The following list of completed jobs is typical of the work done 
in this shop: 

32 Major engine overhauls 

64 Clutch overhauls 
105 Brake systems overhauled 
192 Major tuneup repairs 

12 Main pump ove mauls 
173 Starter overhauls 
206 Generator overhauls 
708 Miscellaneous repairs 

47 Transmission overhauls 

63 Accident repairs 

91 Radiator Repairs 
127 Blacksmith jobs 



The one additional employee authorized for this shop, along with 
the Preventive Maintenance and Inspection Program initiated on DPW 
maintenance and operations vehicles, has been most helpful in providing 
an Improved fleet and reducing downtime. 

66 new and replacement trucks were processed through this shop 
for delivery to the various City departments. 



-15- 



BUR EAU OF SH OPS - Continued 

FIRE APPARATUS SHOP 

This shoo is responsible for the maintenance and repair of 
223 units of heavy fire fighting equipment. A total of 932 jobs were 
completed in the shoo and 2,596 field reoairs made. 

Volume of work required of this shoo increases in direct 
proportion to the increased use of fire apparatus. The Fire Department 
responded to 22,366 alarms during the year, an increase of 24/i in the 
last two fiscal years. 

This additional usage and exposure to traffic puts an extremely 
heavy demand on the services of the shop. 

Additional employments to cope with this need have not been 
approved bv budget authorities. It is essential that notice be taken of 
this situation if we are to keep our fire apparatus in the efficient 
operating condition required by the Fire Department. 

The past fiscal year saw three new (replacement) triple combination 
fire trucks equipped and put into service, as was one service squad and 
one field maintenance truck. 

A communications system for 100' aerial trucks was devised, in 
cooperation with the Department of Electricity and installed on 3 truck 
companies. Additonal installations will be made in the future. 



-16- 




RADIAL DRILL - CENTRAL SHOPS 



MACHINIST DRILLS HYDRANT TAPER FOR USE IN THE 
CITY'S FIRE PROTECTION WATER SYSTEM. 



3'JPEAU OF SHOP? -Continued 

FIRE APPARATUS SHOP - Continued 

Fifteen (15) new ladders were constructed for Fire Department use and 
forty-six ',6) ladders were completely rebuilt and refinished. 

Nine (9) major accidents and thirty-eiqht (38) lesser accidents were 
repaired, repainted, and returned to service. 

Volume of San Francisco Airoort apparatus repairs is increasing as these 
cire fighting units grow in size and complexity. 

MACHINE SHOP 

During the year a total of 790 jobs of separate descriptions were serviced 
through this Division of Central Shops. The complement of the machine shop 
consists of a total of 10 Maintenance Machinists and I Maintenance Machinist 
Foreman, Mr. John Raos. 

The areas in which this section of Central Shops renders a service are in 
the Public Schools, servicina all machine tools and handtools of thelndustria I 
Arts section of the School Department, the complete overhauling of sheet metal 
machines, handsaw and spot welder in the machine shop of Mission High School, 
the complete repairs of the lapidary equipment and ceramic ovens at Samuel Oompers, 
the rebuilding of the surface grinder located in the M achine Shop, Galilee High 
School, all blowers, fans and pumps related to the heating system in schools are 
repaired by this division of Centra! Shops. 

Also, the repairing and servicing of the hot water circulating pumps 
in the boiler room at Woodrow Wilson High School, the installation of new sumo 
pumps at the General Administration Building of the Board o* Education, and the 
repairs to the large folding doors ana the installation of safety devices on 
these doors located in the Gym Building, Lowell High School, the replacing of 
boiler feed lines at Pumping Station #2 located at the foot of Van Ness Avenue, 
the repacking of the turbine pumps at Pumping Station #2, the over-hauling and 
testing of all safety valves on the boilers at Pumping Station #1, located 
at Townsend Street, are handled by this Division. 

The High Pressure Water System, in providing water necessary to fight 
large fires in the City, require the service of the Machine Shop in keeping 
in repair the machinery, boiler room eauipment and fire hydrants to carry out 
this function. 

The sewer treatment plants, consisting of North Point, Richmond, Sunset, 
and South East, are kept in repair by 4 Machinists under the supervision of 
the Machine Shop Foreman. 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

MACHINE SHOP - Continued 

The Maintenance Machinist in these treatment plants repairs and maintains 
machinery necessary to carry out a 24-hour a day operation of these plants. 

The men assigned to these plants are repairing, rebuilding, and manufac- 
turing parts for various Dumps, blowers, filter driers, and other related 
machinery to the operation of these plants. 

The complete over-haul of main lift pumps, the repair cf bar rake screens 
and the replacing and repairing of the rams on the filter cake storaae bin, 
are some of the large jobs that were done this past year at the sewer treatment 
p lants. 

HOSE AND 'BROOM SHOP 

The Hose and Broom Shop is a sub-section of the Machine Shop. This 

section is charged with the inspection, repair and distribution of all fire 

hose as well as the repair and maintenance of hose of all types used in other 
departments. 

Durinq the year 30,000 feet of new hose was inspected, tested, labelled 
and distributed to the various companies in the Fire Department. 

Over 25,00^ feet of in-service fire hose was inspected, repaired and 
sent back to the fire companies. 

Another service rendered in this sub-secTion is the reconstruction 
and the refilling of gutter broom cores used on the various mechanical street 
sweepers used throughout the City. 

RECREATION! AND PARK AUTOMOTIVE SHOP 



This shop, located in the Maintenance Yard area of Golden Gate Park, 
is staffed with 3 Automotive Machinists and I Garageman, supervised by 
Mr. James Elliot, Automotive Machinist-Foreman. 

A complete detailed inventory classification and working file of all 
the eguipment has been completed. Henceforth, an accurate accounting of the 
work performed can be maintained. This latest inventory shows a total of 
357 pieces of equipment serviced and repaired at this shop. During the fiscal 
year 1966-67, 1,359 individual jobs were completed and 102,524 qallons of 
gasoline and 7,040 guarts of oil were dispensed. 

For the last 3 months of the fiscal year, 2 additional Automotive 
Machinists were hired temporarily with supplemental funds. These employments 
completed 120 jobs and reduced the shop backlog of needed equipment for 
Recreation and Park operation. 



■18- 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

RECREATION AND PARK AUTOMOTIVE SHOP - Continued 

The Recreation and Park Shop finds it all but impossible to keen ud 
with the volume of work required of it. The reason beinq the great growth of 
its motorized fleet. 

The present inventory (^l motorized units) must be compared with a 
1952 inventory of 158 units. This increased equipment is maintained by a staff 
that has seen no increase in personnel. 

All things being equal, the size of the maintenance staff must be in 
proportion to: 

1. Number of units in fleet 

2. Type of work fleet performs 

3. Condition of fleet (aqe, mileage, etc.) 

4. Replacement program 

Presently the shop mechanics must maintain approximately 120 units per 
man. The type cf work that the equipment is subjected to is relatively severe. 
The condition of the equipment is generally noor and overage. There is no 
replacement program. Vehicles and motorized equipment are often kept in the 
fleet far beyond their normal economic life. This results in a severe backlog 
of equipment in the shop, abnormal "in shop" downtime and excessive, uneconomical 
repai r costs. 

We strongly recommend that the shop be staffed in proportion to the 
size of the fleet and that a realistic replacement program be initiated. 

HALL OF JUSTICE SERVICE STATION 

This unit of the Central Shops is located adjacent to the Hall of Justice 
and provides fuel and service to Police Department vehicles and fuel and oil 
to other City Departments. The station is operated 7 days a week from 7 A.M. to 
midnight. It is staffed with 8 Automotive Servicemen, I Automotive Servicemam 
Sub-Foreman, Mr. Robert Desmond, 2 Automotive Mechanics and I Automotive 
Mechanic Sub-Foreman, Mr. Howard Gettle. 

The convenient location of this station ■for City vehicles and the 
accelerated usage of Police Department vehicles have made this station a 
high volume distribution point for auto fuels and lubricants. 



-19- 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
HALL OF JUSTICE SERVICE STATION - Continued 

The oast year shows the following services performed: 

Gasoline dispensed 512,600 gallons 

Oil disoensed IP, 412 quarts 

Tow jobs I ,224 

Tires changed (new & recaps) 3,019 

3atteries (new or recharged) 558 

Grease and Service jobs 2,123 

Mechanical repairs 6,2! 9 
Motorcycle service: 

Oi I changes 602 

Tires (new or recaps) 237 

3atteries (new or recharged) 254 

Repairs 465 

The preventative maintenance service and inspection program continues 
to pay dividends in a better operating Police Department fleet with reduced 
down-time due to mechanical failure. Volume of gas and oil dispensed continues 
to rise with a corresponding increase of fleet mileage driven. 

ARMY STREET STATION 

This station located at 2323 Army Street in the Oeoartment of Public 
Works' Malln Yard, provides fuel, lube service and minor repairs to all DPW vehicles 
working out of that area. It operates 5 days per week from 7 A.M. to Midnight 
and is staffed with 4 Automotive Servicemen, I Automotive Machinist Sub-Foreman, 
Mr. E. Franke, and I Automotive Machinist. 

December I, 1966 saw an important change in operational procedure at 
this station. The much sought after Preventive Maintenance Program was initiated. 

This service is performed on a 3:30 to 12-00 P. M . shift when vehicles 
are not being used. The purpose of the P.M. program is to keep all rolling stock 
in a safe and satisfactory operating condition at an economical cost and with 
the lowest possible shop time. 



-20- 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

APtT STREET STATION - Continued 

This is done by inspecting and servicing each vehicle thoroughly at 
regular intervals and bv adjustinc and repairing anything that shows need at 
the titie. 

During the first sever, months of P.M. servicing 983 vehicles were 
serviced with 277 repairs being completed at that time. 57 vehicles vere'found 
to have unsafe operating conditions and required immediate shop service. 

18,400 quarts of oil and 292,400 gallons of gasoline were used in 
servicing DP*'.' vehicles. 

The other service rendered at Army Street Station was the pumoing of 
7,957 gal Ions of kerosene for DPI.' use. 

The day shift (7 A.M. to 3:30 P.".) made minor field reDairs totaling 
1,532 to DP'.! vehicles. This covers the twelve month period. 

19th AVENUE SERVICE STATION 



This station, located on 19th Avenue near Taraval Street, provides 
service and garage facilities for DPV. ! vehicles assigned to the western section 
og the City. Gasoline and oil are dispensed to other City vehicles operating 
in that area, thereby effecting a substantial saving in -fuel costs and operators' 
time. 

55,045 gallons of gasoline and 440 gallons of oil were dispensed; major 
services were performed on heavy duty trucks and minor services and repairs 
made. 105 vehicles were creased and oiled within this fiscal vear. 



The rapid technological progress in the automotive industry requires 
that our craftsmen keep up to date. This past year saw selected members of 
our staff attending training courses, sponsored by leading manufacturers, covering 
maintenance and repair of smoc devices, automatic transmissions, electrical 
diagnosis, hydraulic systems as well as San Francisco Civil Service Training 
courses. 

A continued effort is being made to widen the scope of our' Preventive 
f'ai ntenance Program to include the Fire Department plus other smaller city 

departments. 

The desi reabi I i ty of a firm replacement prcqram is still being recommended 
and, we hope, coming closer to a reality. Implementation of these two programs 
will provide the City with the maximum utilization of its fleet at the lowest 
possible cost. 

Continued progress has been made in effecting collections wherein City 
owned vehicles have been damaged by second parties. 



-21- 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 



Over 140 invoices were furnished the various departments. $10,320 
was collected and returned to the departments' repair funds; S3, 138 was 
collected from prior years' action and returned to the General Fund. Total 
collections amounted to S I 3 ,458 and aDproximatel y $36,500 in claims were 
turned over to the Delinquent Pevenue Bureau for further collection effort, 



-22- 



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REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Blueprint and Reproduction Department provides reproduction 
services, namely Photography, Offset Printing, Mimeographing, Photostating, 
Blueprinting and Electrostatic Copier Printing, to all City Departments. 

Work performed during 1966-67 amounted to $141,650, an increase of 
$24,000 over 2 years. 

Funds were provided from 65 departments through Budget Transfers 
and Work Orders. 

The Bureau is administered by a Blueprint and Reproduction Manager 
with a staff of ten employees. 

Personnel Room 50, Basement, City Hal l_ 

1. 3lueprint and Reproduction Manager 

I Senior Offset Machine Operator 

I Offset Machine Operator 

I Photo-Lithographer 

1 Senior Blueprint Operator 

2 Blueprint Machine Operators 
I Photostat Operator 

I Photostat Operator - part time 

I Senior Account Clerk 

I Photographer - as needed 



Equipment 

1 42 Blueprint Machine 

2 42 Ammonia Process Machines 

I 19' x 23' Process copy camera (new) 

I 14' x 17" Offset Duplicating Machine 

I 10" x 14" Offset Duplicating Machine 

1 26' Power Cutter 

2 8 1/2 x 14 Mimeograph Machines 
I 18" x 24' Photostat Machine 

1 18'' x 24' Electrostatic Printer (prints from 

microf i Im) 

2 Microfilm Machines (I 35mm and I 16mm) 
I Power Driven Book Stapler 

IMPROVEMENTS 



Two 914 Xerox Machines (self service) I located in Room 50 City Hall 
the other in City Hall Annex, were exchanqed for two 2400 Xerox Machines which 
ODerate 8 times faster saving the City $100 per month per machine. 



-23- 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU - Continued 



Major Recurring Functions of the Reproduction Bureau 



At I Departments 

Various Departments (20) 

Assessor 

City Attorney 

Board of Supervisors 

Purchasinq 

Treasurer 

Recreation & Park 



Public Works, Enoineering, 
Bureau of Architecture, 
Recreation & Park, SFUSD 

Public Works, City Attorney, 
SFUSD 



Assessor, Public Works, Real Estate,. 
Recorder, Tax Col lector, Purchasinq 



Departmental Budqet Estimates 

Annual Reports 

Real Property Transfer Records 

Opinions & other Lena I Papers 

Calendars and Ordinances 

Bids Specifications K Purchasina Records 

Microfilm Records of Checks Deposited 

Specifications for Construction, Maintenance 
and Repair of Buildinqs, Parks, and 
Recreational Facilities 

Contract sets of Blueprints for Construction 
Maintenance K Repair of Public Bui I inqs 
Streets, Sewers and Recreational Facilities 



Photonraphy in connection with Construction 
Proqress, Earth Slides, Accidents, 
Redevelopment and Planning. 



Blueprintinq of Block ''aps of the City and 
County of S.F. 



In addition to the major functions listed above the bureau performs many 
hundreds of nonrecurrinq jobs for City departments. The qreater part of this 
work is of an urqent nature and deadlines set by ordinance: advertised dates 
for bids- and the normal reouirements of departments' deadlines which must be met. 

STUDIES 

Labor saving equipment is badly needed. The volume of work has increased 
r )2,000 per month in 2 years, with no increase in personnel. 

With the followinq equipment, it is estimated we could save city departments 
$12,000 a year- 
Automatic Col I ator c 8,000 
Automatic Press 8,300 

Paper Plate Processor 7,000 



Total 



$23,300 



With a savinq of $12,000 per year this equipment would pay for itself in 
less than two years. 



-24- 



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APPENDIX 



TABLE NO. I 
PUPCHASE ORHEPS POOCESSFO 









1966-1967 










Purchase 










Orders 


Amount 


General 






15,429 


$ 7,325,028 


Education 






3,151 


4,216,464 


Health 






6,200 


3,673,963 


Uti lities 






5,839 


4.381,563 


Tc 


>tal 


5 


35,669 


$19,507,918 


Purchases 


by 


Ei 


icunbrance 




Requests 








$23,695,209 


Total 






543,293,127 





J_965- 


-1966 


Purchase 






Orders 




Amount 


14.743 




$ 6,365,613 


P. 753 




4,634,538 


5,626 




3.483,747 


_5_,463 




4.404,55^ 


34,735 




$18,888,478 



"19,^53 ,203 
$38,441 ,776 



TABLE NO. 2 

EXPENDI TURES 

Comoarison of expenditures with original budget for all 
operating aopropriations except Parsonal Services for 1966-1967 

Encumbered 
Account Budgeted & Expe nded Surp I us Defici t 

Contractual Services 
6.31 1.200.000 

Materials * SupdI ies 

6.311.300.000 15,055 17,406 $2,351 

Equipment 
6.31 I .400.000 

Premium - Official Bonds 
6.315. 812.31 I 

Premium - Autc Insurance 
6. 315. 813. 31 I 

Membership Dues 

6.311.800.000 5,214 3,995 1,219 

Total $ 85,385 $ 73,540 S 14,196 $ 2,351 



REVENUE 



Budceted 


Ei 


icumbered 
Expended 


$ 12,043 




$ 1 1 .724 


15,0=55 




17,406 


3,635 




3.325 


6,433 




5,760 


43,000 




31 ,330 


5,214 




3,995 



Comoarison of Revenues with Estimated Revenues 1966-67 





Estimated 


Actua 1 




Over 


Under 


Account 


Revenue 


Revenue 


Estl 


i mated 


Estimated 


Sale of Documents 


$ 1 ,500 


S 1 ,208 


$ 


292 




7061 












Minor Sales 


7,000 


13,872 






$6,872 


7062 












Sales of Grease 


2,500 


4,254 






1,754 


7621 













Total $11,000 $19,334 $292 SB, 626 



SHOP EXPENDITURES 

Comparison of expenditures with original budget for all appropriations except 
personal services for 1966-67. 



OBJECT 

Administrative Salaries 
Wages 

Contractual Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Ret ? rement 
Work Orders 
TOTAL 



1966-67 




1965-66 


$ 11,856 


% 


1 1 ,292 


649,247 




600,131 


148,573 




145^637 


192,608 




190,844 


7,033 




6,570 


98,972 




97,865 


$1,108,289 


$ 1 


,052,339 



Contractural Services 
Original Appropriation 
By Transfer 

Less unexpended 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE 



94,576 




92,107 


75,430 




59,129 


170,006 




151,236 


21 ,433 




5.599 


1 148,573 


$ 


145,637 



Material and Supplies 
Original Appropriation 
By Transfer 

Less Unexpended 
EXPENDITURE 



192,916 

$ 192,916 

308 
$ 192,608 



186,703 
18,000 

204,703 
13,859 

190,844 



-fe& 



DOC. 

TRANCISCO 



^__ PURCHA5 I NG DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
ANNUAL REPORT 



FISCnL YEAR 1967-63 



September, 1968 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 CITY HALL 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 94102 



September 18, 1968 



Annual Report 
Fiscal Year 1967-68 



Mr. Thomas J . Me I Ion 

Chief Administrative Officer 

289 City Hal I 

Dear Mr. Mel Ion: 

The annual report of the Purchasing Department for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1968 is herewith respectfully submitted. 

As stated in detail in the report the department expended $19,001,733 by 
37,439 purchase orders and $22,398,420 by encumbrance requests; maintained 
25 storerooms and sold $99,015 surplus City property. The Central Shops fur- 
nished services in the amount of $1,164,214. Reproduction Bureau furnished 
services in the amount of $150,570. 

Continued effort is being made Dy bureaus to give departments faster and 
better service. 

Problems in the past resulting from operating with temporary help have been 
alleviated by appointment of permanent personnel in many instances. 

The following statements on the activities of the department for the past 
fiscal year answer the specific inquiries of the Mayor to all departments, 
dated August 21 , 1968. 

1. There were no capital programs in progress during the year. 

2. Recommendations on the activities of the department, as stated 
in the annual report include: 

a) Establish specification and control system for buying on a 
ful I -time basi s. 

b) Continue expansion of the vehicle management system. With 
your assistance and the cooperation of the budget reviewing 
authorities significant progress has been made in a preventive 
maintenance program. No additional personnel was provided for 
the 1968-69 fiscal year. During 1968-69 it is proposed to 
study the possibilities of establishing reserves for more 
timely vehicle purchases. 



Mr. Thomas J. Mellon - 2 - September 18, 1968 

Chief Administrative Officer 

c) Study of Purchasing Department procedure by EDP personnel 
is continuing on a limited basis. 

d) Determine areas in which Federal and State financial assist- 
ance is available and may be advantageously expended. 

3. The comparison of expenditures for all appropriations other than 
those for personal services with original budget appropriations 
for 1967-68 is given in the appendix, annual report. Funds for 
departments' activities are obtained mainly by transfers from 
budget appropriations of other departments. 

4. The comparison of revenues with revenues estimated in the budget 
of 1967-68 is given in the appendix, annual report. 

5. The budget appropriations of other departments for automotive and 
other equipment services, and for tabulating and reproduction, 
should be increased yearly to compensate for the increase in work 
required, and for steadily increasing labor and material costs. 

6. The statistics on work accomplished are given in the annual report. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your continuous support, 
encouragement and advice, and to express my appreciation for the cooperation 
given me by my fellow workers in the Purchasing Department. 

Very truly yours, 



^^ 



5> 



T. F. CONWAY 
Purchaser of Supplies 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PURCHAS I NG DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



The Department purchases Materials and supplies, equipment and contractual 
services for all departmenTs for the City and County,, including city-owned util- 
ities, and the San Francisco Unified School District; repairs and maintains auto- 
motive and other equipment for the various departments, except Public Utilities, 
and for the School District as requested; operates a central reproduction bureau 
for departments requiring its services; transfers to other departments for use or 
sells equipment and supplies no longer useful to any department of tne city, 
maintains a perpetual inventory of equipment in the various departments; and oper- 
ates central stores of the Purchasing anci various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by the Shops on 
equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of Buying on new proGucts, 
specifications and prices. 

PERSONNEL 

Employments totaled 196 permanent in four Dureaus. The Organization Chart 
is shown in the Appendix. 

Supervisory - June 30, 1968 
Admi ni strati ve 

T. F. Conway - Purchaser of Supplies 

D. J. Hewartson - Secretary 

Bureaus 

Buy i ng 

J. C. Gavin - Assistant Director of Purchasing & Services - Bureau Head 

G. A. Clarke - Senior Purchaser 

C. J. Morrissey - Coding Supervisor (acting) 

Equipment and Supplies 

J. H. Beck - Stores and Equipment Supervisor - Bureau Head 

J. A. Frantz - Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor (acting) 

Personal and Accounts 

George Harley - Chief Clerk - bureau Heaa 
R. A. Davis - Principal Clerk 

Shops 

A. M. Flaherty - General Superintendent of City Shops - Bureau Head 

E. A. Rames - Assistant Superintendent of City Shops 



Bureaus - Continued 



SEPARATIONS: Retirements, Deaths 

The valued services of the following were separated from City employment 
through retirement c : or death after years of meritorious accomplishment. 



Name 
Foley, Betty 
McAnnal ly, A I ice K. 
Griesinger, Walter 
Lyon, lona B. 
Wehrle, Muriel J. 
Norris, Stephen C. 
Rose, Manuel J. 



Position 



Approx. Years 
City Service 



Senior Clerk Typist 21 

General Clerk Typist 12 

Maintenance Machinist 8 
Senior Clerk Stenographer 9 

Chief Clerk 25 

Automotive Machinist 9 

Storekeeper 23 



Date 



7- 


-67 


8- 


-67 


8- 


-67 


9- 


-67 


0- 


-67 


2- 


-68 


3- 


-68 



Died 



Page, Robert 0. 



Senior Storekeeper 



19* 



3-13- 



WORK ACCOMPLISHED 

The work accomplished in tne fiscal year, described in more detail under 
the separate bureaus remained substantially the same over all as in !966-b7. 



Recapitulation is as follows: 



bureau 
Buying 

Stores & 
Equi pment 

Shops 
Reproduction 



Unit 



1966-1967 



Services rendered 
Amount 



1967-1968 



Purchase Orders 




35,667 






37 


,439 


Amount 


$ 


19,597,918 


$ 


19 


,001 


,733 


Encumbrance Requests 














Amount 


$ 


23,695,209 


$ 


22 


,398 


,420 


Surplus Sales - Amount 


$ 


58,591 


$ 




99 


,015 


Major Stores operated 




1 1 








1 1 


Job Orders 




7,647 






7 


,164 


Expenditures 


$ 


1,108,289 


S 


1 


,385 


,070 



141 ,650 



150,570 



- 2 



GENERAL COMMENTS 

The period covered by this report, while not marked by material changes 
in facilities, procedjres and methods, saw steady progress being made. 

The specification and control section, initiated to make studies whicn 
cannot be done by present staff without curtailing ana delaying service to 
other departments, continued on an Intermittent basis because of lack of 
personnel. The need for expanding this function to full time is considered 
obvious in view ot continuing technological advances in processes, equipment, 
materials and supplies. 

Studies by EDP personnel continue en a limited basis. It was hoped that 
a comprehensive survey of the (Department could be speedily completed to 
determine how data processing can be utilized to improve our services to other 
departments but requested funds were not approved. In the meantime some 
progress is being made and improved procedures, described elsewhere in this 
report, have been put into operation. 

Activities of the Central Shops, Reproduction Bureau and the Bureau of 
Stores and Equipment are describee- and commented on elsewhere in this report. 
The filling of key positions with permanent personnel during the period of 
this report can be expected to be advantageous. 



3UREAU OF BUYING 

This Bureau, procures materials and supplies, equipment anc insurance, 
and contracts for services, for all city departments and the San Francisco 
Unifiea Scnool District. Except for term contracts based on estimated quanti- 
ties, all buying starts with receipt of requisition from using department. 
Included in or incidental to the procurement function are the following: 
(outlined in detail in a previous report) 

I . Buying - 3 i ds and Awards 

Preparation of bids, including contractual and technical requirements; 
evaluation of bids; and award of bias. 

I I . Buying - Related Functions 

Analysis of records of average use; maintenance of specification file; 
new term contracts; ana review of procedures. 

PERSONNEL 

The buying division is headed by the Assistant Director of Purchasing and 
Services end includes I! assistant purchasers. The clerical staff, under the 
Bureau of Personnel ana Accounts, is engagec in typing, mailing, opening and 
tabulating bids, maintaining bid index and specifications file, and typing 
contracts. Funas for some of these employments, both buying and clerical, are 
provided by other departments. 

Detailed employments are as follows: 

I Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 

1 Senior Purchaser 
7 Purchasers 

2 Purchasers (Printing) 
I Assistant Purchaser 

OPERATIONS 

Purchasing work is assigned on a commodity basis with allowance for items 
of a special nature or in cases where seasonal peaks or vacation period make it 
advisable to temporarily deviate from this policy. 

Periodic meetings of the buying staff permit the exchange of ideas, 
explanation of improved procedures and generally keep the assistant purchasers 
informed as to the overall progress and problems. 

Every effort is made to process requisitions as rapidly as possible but 
delays occur due to lack of personnel, inadequate information furnished with 
requisitions, and failure of oepartments to submit requisitions promptly for 
equipment items that are to be grouped for purchase for purposes of standard- 
ization and economy. 



- 4 - 



BUREAU OF BUYING - Continued 

OPERATIONS - Continuea 

In preparing requisitions, departments are requested to furnish information 
that will indicate a standard of overall quality and usefulness suitaDle for 
actual use requirements and permit competition as required by the Charter and 
Administrative Code. A new form was devised for this purpose making it easier 
for departments to furnish desirable information for bid purposes. 

As time is available personnel are assigned to: 

1. Review specifications, forms and procedures. 

2. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing additional 
term contracts for articles and services wnere desirable. 

The need for a separate section to expand the aoove services is apparent 
if the department is to most efficiently and effectively perform its purchasing 
functions. This work is now being done on an intermittent basis as time is 
available. Every effort should te made to procure a full-time employment for 
this work. 

Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into for various service 
and commodities in general use by several departments or recurring use by a 
department. The main advantages are elimination of the time lag resulting when 
individual bids are requested and elimination of the cost involved in individual 
bi as. 

New term contracts initiated during the year include: 

1. Cleaning Service, Sewer Lines for S.F.U.S.D. 

2. Disinfectant, hospital. 

3. Student Police Uniforms. 

4. Coach Tire Rental. 

5. San Francisco Municipal Railway Uniforms. 

6. Syringes and needles, disposable and reusable. 

In addition to these new term contracts, old contracts are constantly being 
revised, specifications up-dated, no longer required items deieted and new items 
added. 



- 5 - 



BUREAU OF 3UYIJ,G 



)onti nued 



OPERATIONS - Continued 

Some purchases or contracts of en unusual nature include the following: 



Central Broadcasting 
Programming System 

Audiometric Equipment 

Ultrasonoscope, Diagnostic 

Conso I e-Announcer 

Data Processing Equipment 

l>otor Launch 

Traffic Signal Controller 

Cage, Golf, Driving 

Rescue Fire Fighting Apparatus 

*X-Ray Unit 

**Furni cation Cabinets 



Scnool 

Health 

Health 

Ai rport 

Scnool 

Hetcn Hetcny 

Works 

School 

Ai rport 

De Ycuna Museum 



*The X-Ray is a wide-range type capable of penetrating up to 3nd including i j| 
bronze. For a painting, as an exarnole, it will be possible to detect frac- 
tures in the panel, cverpainting, forgeries^ and old restorations inexpertly 
done. For Chinese bronzes it will ha poooibis +u ascertain ttte methods used 
in their construction, old repairs, weak spots, covered fractures, replaced 
elements, joints, and what is happening uncer the heavy patination. On wooden 
objects the nails, pins, wires, etc. used in old repairs will become visible, 
and the general "health !i of the piece will De apparent. 

**The fumigation cabinet will be used for art objects of wood, lacquer, paper, 
cloth, and similar materials subject to attack or damage by wood-beetles, 
borers, wood-worms, moths, silverfish or other destructive insects. 



- 6 - 



APPLICATION OF DATA PROCESSING 

The first use of data processing in the purchasing procedure itself 
(as opposed to records for reference) has recently been put into effect in 
connection v/ith warehouse stock purchases for the San Francisco Unified 
School District. 

The District annually issues stock-replenishment requisitions for 
standard stock items. The unit description; with some cnanges to up-date 
this description, remains constant, whereas there are many quantity changes 
each time to reflect current needs. In many cases specific items will not 
be required at the particular time. 

In the past it was necessary to recopy the entire list of MOO items 
each year. By printing out the stored basic information, the District can 
be furnished with a complete listing, less quantities. Quantities are added 
and deletions (and changes if necessary) are made on this listing. This is 
fed into storage and subsequent printouts, reflecting the District's current 
needs, which are used for bids and the resulting purchase orders. 

A substantial and significant amount of time has resulted from the 
application of this process. 

This office will welcome the opportunity to discuss the application of 
this method, or other data processing methods, to the requisitioning pro- 
cedures of the various City departments. 



- 7 - 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS 

Gocrge Harley - Chief Clerk 
Robert A. Davis - Principal Clerk 

Traveling i-'cnthly Repetitive Purchase Orders are processed 

Requisitions: on Corriputyper Tape. Large numbers of requisitions 

as used by Public Health, Public Utilities, Library, 
Purchasing, Recreation & Park, Sheriff, Public Works, 
Schools, and Controller. 

Friden Equipment; Aocitional bios and Furchase Orders were done on 

these machines during the past year, We have reached 
capacity of Ccmputyper use fcr Traveling Requisitions 
ano are at Coi.iputyper capacity for other purchase 
orders. 

Tabulation of Microfilming of bics on Contract Proposals anG 
bios: Quotation continued. 

Requisition Cumulative weekly and monthly, as well as daily, 
Register: runs of this register have been continues. It is 

inaispensable in locating requisitions processeo 

for Purchase Order. 

Vendor Index: Continued 

Coces on Purcnase Use of Vendor Location Code, Buyer Code, and Commodity 
Orders: Code continued. 

Bid Index: Continued 

Preparation of We are continuing to make up sets of Purchase Orders 
Purchase Orders: on a ranaom basis as we nave founo this an excellent 
way to expeaite issuance of purchase orders. 

The number of purchase orders to be preparec is not constant chiefly 
due to the fact that requisitions do not flow into the cepartment in a uniform 
manner. Consequently there are times when a high production may be desired 
when personnel is depletea by variations (which cannot be spread over the 
normal vacation period due to conditions beyono our control) sickness, or 
otherwise. Our very limited temporary funcs must be used in even more 
critical areas ano at more critical times. It is hoped that sufficient 
funds for the temporary employments will be provided in the future. 

Sales of Charters, Codes and other documents amounteG to $18,332. 

Discounts earned amounted to $80,814.06 or 99. 2% and discounts unearned 
$650.46 or 0.3%. Comparaole figures fcr the previous fiscal year were 
$87,323.22 or 99.2% and discounts unearned $724.40 or 0.8%. 



CODING DIVISION 



The Coding Division, under the Eureau of Buying, continues the 
development of the material and supplies coding system. The system 
now being used by all requisitioning departments. 

Closer control and supervision of the coding system has been 
realized since the transferring of thi item identification IBM cards 
from the Tabulating Division to the coJing section. 

Due to the many requests for new code numbers, and cancellation 
of certain codes by departments, constant changes and additions are 
being made. The departments affected by these changes are notified. 
Revised code catalogs, and a new improved item index are planned for 
the future. 

At our request, departments continue to send personnel for per- 
sonal instruction. They are instructed in the correct procedures per- 
taining to the use of the coding system when writing requisitions. We 
favor this action and have plans for future instruction. 

At present the division is cooperating with personnel from the 
EDP section of the Controller's Office, in the exploration of methods 
to expedite the processing of purchase orders for the Scnool Department, 

Several representatives from other city governments and private 
industry visited our coding section and were very complimentary. 



- 9 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT 



The Bureau of 
warehouse and storeroom 
materials, supplies and 
of San Francisco; and ma 
of the various agencies 
surplus and obsolete per 
ment between departments 
purchased for the City a 
materials purchased for 
checks of such property, 
fleet, including the lis 



Stores and Equipment operates and maintains a central 
in various City departments; receives and issues 
equipment for all departments of the City and County 
kes miscellaneous emergency purchases for the account 

This Bureau arranges for the sale of and sells 
sonal property belonging to the City, exchanges equip- 
, maintains a perpetual inventory of all materials 
nd County of San Francisco and inventory of all 
the City and County of San Francisco and makes periodic 

The Bureau maintains control of the entire automotive 
ting, insurance and the reporting of all accidents. 



The following locations are staffed and operated by the 3ureau of 
Stores and Equipment. 



Name and Location 

Central Warehouse - 15th & 

Harr i son 



Dept. Publ ic Works 
Water Department 
Hetch Hetchy 
S.F. Int'l Airport 
Muni ci pal Ra i 1 way 



Heal th Dept. 



Social Services 



Type 

Stat i onery 
Janitorial Supplies 
i;000 Cases Foodstuffs 
Misc. Furni turc 
Pipe, etc. 



2323 Army St. 
1990 Newcomb Ave. 
Moccas in, Ca 1 i f . 
So. San Francisco 

- 24th & Utah Sts. and 
2 sub-stores 
General Store) 
Washington & Mason) 

- Elkton Yard (3ond Fund) 

- Potrero and one sub-store 

- S.F. General Hospital, 
22nd & Potrero 

- Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th & Dewey 

- Hassler Hospital, Redwood City 

- Single Mens 1 Rehabilitation Center, 
Redwood City 

901 Rankin Street 



ty 



Dept. of Electric 

Recreation and Park-Golden Gate Perk 

Sheriff 

Central Shop Store 



Hall of Justice Garage (Sub-Store) 



Amount of Inventory 

10,657 
5,403 
* 



134,634 

577, 4£o 

44,360 

23,082 
141 ,409 



317,646 
32,449 
95,223 

255,51fc 

171,979 

54,543 

2,333 

32,391 

63,649 
32,031 



* Storage only - Amount included with departmental inventory. 



-10 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 

PERSONNEL 

The Sales, Inventory and Stores Division are staffed by the following: 

1 Stores and Equipment Supervisor 

1 Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

1 Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

1 Senior Clerk-Typist 

2 Inventory Clerks 

11 Senior Storekeepers 

21 Storekeepers (plus 1 Storekeeper on work order) 
8 Assistant Storekeepers 
1 Laborer 
TOTAL 47 

SALES DIVISIOH 

Twenty sales were conducted during the fiscal year under the author- 
ity of Section 88 of the Charter. Sales activities included legal research 
into various aspects of different sales, preparation of sales, inviting in- 
terested buyers to bid, opening and awarding of bids, collecting and depositing 
all money received from buyers with the City Treasurer and keeping records of 
correspondence relative to the sales. 

The total revenue from the sales of I967-68 was $99,015. A general 
breakdown of the sales is as follows: 

X-Ray Film $ 8,678 

Sand 23,170 

Block Books 225 

Auto & Trucks 20,304 

Motorcycles 1 ,548 

Art Objects 8,320 

Poles 900 

Scrap Metal 28,583 

Musical Instruments 2,814 

Waste Paper 1 ,437 

Grease & Bones 2,609 

Sacks & Containers 427 

TOTAL $99,015 



BUREAU OF STORES A HP EQUIPMENT - Continued 



INVENTORY DIVISION 

During the fiscal year, and for the past few years, through 
the cooperation of the Department of Social Services, a job training 
program has been in effect, with a training group consisting of two 
(2) male fieldmtn and two (2) female typists. With their assistance, 
we have completed the physical inventory of various City Departments; 
bringing their equipment inventories up-to-date. The fieldmen, .under 
supervision, take a complete physical check of equipment, affix decals, 
compare and correct descriptions, and record the data on field sheets. 
The information is then processed and recorded on I.B.M. by Controller's 
Tabulation Bureau, and presented to the respective department heads 
for their acknowledgment and acceptance. To further the training and 
experience of these groups, we sometimes secure temporary outside employ- 
ment, supplementing their training program with earned wages and further 
experience. 

This division has the assignment of maintaining the equipment 
inventory of all City Departments; the investigation and reporting to 
the Board of Supervisors on lost, damaged or stolen items of equipment; 
and the transfer of surplus or rehabilitated equipment. 

The accumulation of waste materials, such as scrap metal, 
waste paper, tab cards, X-ra v film, and various items of equipment, no 
longer useful to the City, is gcn.i, ere d and disposed of by sale. We 
assist also in the sale of vehicles wh;<Ji are surplus to the City. 

Meetings with various City Department heads and moving con- 
tractors, to co-crdinate, set up procedure and secur- estimates to 
negotiate moves are a function of the Division. During ttit ;*.cr-a1 year, 
we entered into and negotiated over 50 moves — Health Department, Recora 
Center, Disaster Corps, Utilities Engineers, City Architecture. ="<* 
Department of Social Services, were among many rlp P .->r tments dealt with. 
The transfer and rehabilitation of various office equipment, and vehicles 
between City Departments, resulted in a savings of approximately So5,000, 
inventory book value. 



- 12 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



S TORES DIVISION 

This past year showed some changes in personnel. A very worthy and 
efficient Senior Storekeeper passed away; then a long time very capable 
Storekeeper was lost to us by retirement and an Assistant Storekeeper resigned 
to enter another field of public service. We were very fortunate to obtain 
from Civil Service Lists well qualified replacements for the above three 
positions. 

The coding system of ordering and inventory control and issuing has 
been improved and continues to offer a more efficient method of control. 

Due to the rapid expansion of the San Francisco Airport facilities, 
plans are being worked on for a new and larger Storeroom. 

The Storeroom for the 2*+th and Utah Bus Repair Shops was reorganized 
to be ready when the new buses arrive in the near future. 

More space was gained by careful re-arranging of stock at the Park 
Yard Storeroom to receive full truck loads of cement, thus saving ninety cents 
a barrel by ordering bigger amounts. 

The new Storeroom at Moccasin is now operating at full capacity with 
a new punch card system of control . 

Many new items were placed in stock at the Department of Public Works 
Storeroom to make this a more efficient operation. 

GENERAL 

Lost time due to injuries was kept to a minimum by a continuing safety 
program. 

The Stores 6- Equipment Assistant Supervisor was invited to participate 
as an interviewer on a State Oral Board and on two Oral Boards for Alameda County 
for Storekeeper examinations. 



13 



BUREAU OF SHOPS 



The Bureau of Shops sprung from Charter provisions which give the 
Purchaser of Supplies the responsibility of maintaining City-owned equip- 
ment, PARTICULARLY ITS MOTOR VEHICLES, 

Prior to the consolidation of the repair shops in its modern, effic- 
ient facility at 800 Quint Street in 1959* the locale of its operations 
was rather sequestered. 

Fire apparatus repairs and Machine Shop activities were located in the 
North Beach area on Francisco Street; the shop on Alameda Street, near old 
Seal's Stadium, was the scene for truck maintenance and a wide variety of 
other repairs; while automobiles were serviced in a rented garage on Calif- 
ornia Street near Van Ness Avenue. 

Then, as now, Recreation and Park automotive repairs were made in the 
Golden Gate Park maintenance yard. 

For a brief time, after the sale of the Alameda Street property to 

private enterprise, the trucks were repaired in an abandoned scavenger garage 

in the North Beach area; and later, when the new shops were being designed 

and built, the truck shop and auto shop were located in the crumbling 
Palace of Fine Arts in the Marina. 

The present spacious Quint Street installation encompasses main and 
satellite maintenance shops for the following activities: 

1 <, Passenger Car Repairs 

2. Heavy Duty Vehicle Repairs 

3. Repairs to Fire Fighting Apparatus and Equipment 
k. Machine Shop Services 

In addition, there are Shop facilities for blacksmithy, laoder repair 

and manufacture, pattern making, auto painting, body and fender work, hose 

repair, upholstering and leather work, repair and replacement of tires; and 

vehicle fueling, lubricating and other minor services. 

Outlying operations include the Golden Gate Fark Maintenance Yard, 
specializing in the maintenance of recreation and park equipment; the hall 
of Justice Service Station which furnishes gas, lubricants and service to 
Police cars as well as to other City vehicles excepting those owned by 
Public Utilities; the army Street Service Yard, where the large Public Works 
auto fleet secures gas and preventive maintenance; and the general service 
operations which take place at the Public Health Garage, the Department of 
Electricity - Rankin Street Yard, and the Nineteenth Avenue heavy duty equip- 
ment YARD OPERATED BY PUBLIC WORKS. 

Beyond its principal function, the maintenance of a smooth and 

EFFICIENTLY RUNNING ClTY AuTO FlEET, THE BUREAU OF SHOPS FULFILLS OTHER IM- 
PORTANT RESPONSIBILITIES. 

FOR INSTANCE, IT MAKES INSPECTIONS, FIGURES REPAIR APPRAISALS AND OFFERS 



14 



RECOMMENDATIONS ON ALL USED VEHICLES FOR WHICH REPLACEMENT IS CONTEMPLATED 
BY THE OWNING DEPARTMENT. In ADDITION, THE BUREAU OF SHOPS ASSISTS VARIOUS 

City Departments in the preparation of specifications for procurement of 
equipment. All new City purchased vehicles must receive their final seal 
of acceptance at Central Shops. Those vehicles which are Central Shops 
maintained undergo outfitting and other preparations prior to their being 
placed into service. 

There are presently 2,068 items of equipment (including motorcycles) 
under the direct care of Central Shops. 

This marks an increase of fiftyone units over the figure reported for 
1966-67. In assets valuation, Central Shops is industriously involved in 

THE UPKEEP OF A NEAR SEVEN MILLION DOLLAR INVESTMENT. On E HUNDRED AND THREE 

Shops employees, administrative and craftsmen, share this sizeable res- 
ponsibility. (See Organizational Chart). 

Still further refinements of operation are actively contemplated, such 
as the inauguration of an inter-departmental car-leasing project, the wider 
use of Electronic Data Processing in accounting and record maintenance; 
along with a study of the feasibility of amalgamating the many loosely-knit 
FACETS OF City fleet operation within a concentrated responsibility of the 
Central (Shops') Transport Division. 

During the year, the following Shops employees climaxed a commendable 
and faithful clty career! 

Walter Griesinger, Maintenance Machinist 

Stephen Norris, Automotive Machinist 

Their work skills, as well as genial fellow association, are appreciably 
missed. 



5 - 



ACCOUN T ING 

The accounting section, under the supervision of Michael Merdich 
(Accountant - L.T.), kept strict control of the Central Shop expenditures 
of 73 various City bureaus and departments, furnished monthly balances to 
Shop supervisors, prepared inventory listings of all equipment serviced 
by Central Shops, furnished Quarterly Expenditure runs by Job Number, 
Vehicle Number, and by Accidents to all departments. 

In addition, prepared per diem Shop Payroll, distributing labor costs 
to dep a rtmen ts . 

During the fiscal year, 1 1 8 accident invoices were requested by City 
Departments and Bureaus for a total billing of &33, 667.00 of which 
^13,002.00 WAS immediately collecteo from the responsible parties and re- 
turned to the various departments' maintenance and repair accounts. 

The remaining uncolle ctable bills were turned over to the Bureau of 
Delinquent Revenue for future collections for ultimate deposit into the 
general fund. 



- 16 - 



FIRE APPARATUS SHO P 

This Shop is responsible for the maintenance and repair of 22? units 
of heavy duty fire fighting apparatus; while the sub-shops maintain, repair 
and/or manufacture related tools and equipment used in fire pightinga 

the apparatus shop is staffed with eight (8) automotive machinists, 
two automotive servicemen, one sub-foreman auto machinist and one foreman 
(Mr. Leonard Counihan). This shop completed 865 major maintenance and re- 
pair jobs, serviced 206 automobiles and 176 heavy fire apparatus, changed 
168 batteries in the field and responded to 2840 field repair requests. 

a partial listing of work performed on the fire apparatus includes: 

27 major engine overhauls and repairs 
97 minor engine repairs 
27 clutch replacements 
19 brake rel i nes 

51 major tune-ups 

35 radiator removals and repairs 
32 fire pump repairs 

52 transmission overhauls and repairs 
5^ collision type body repairs 

21 aerial ladder systems repaired 

Seven (7) vehicles were outfitteo and/or modified for service. In- 
cluding TWO (2) TRIPLE COMBINATION PUMPERS, ONE (1) AERIAL TRUCK, ONE (l) 
COMMAND VEHICLE, TWO (2) SHOP SERVICE TRUCKS AND ONE (1) HOSE TENDER COMPLET- 
ELY REBUILT, REFINISHED, AND INSTALLED ON NEW CHASSIS. 

TH E L ADDER SHOP , STAFFED BY TWO (2) PATTERN MAKERS, MANUFACTURED THREE 

(3) NEW 35 FOOT EXTENSION LADDERS, THREE (3) 32 FOOT STRAIGHT LADDERS, THREE 
(3) ATTIC EXTENSION LADDERS AND ONE (1) FIRE BOAT BOARDING LADDER. 

In aodition, fifty-eight (58) LADDERS OF VARIOUS SIZE AND TYPE WERE 
overhauled and repaired and twelve (12) new patterns were manufactured 
along with myriad other related work. 

The paint shop (3 painters) and the body and fender repairs (1 body 
and fender worker) repaired and painted 5^ collision type damages and 72 
various minor body repairs. several flre apparatus scorched at fires were 
sanded and refinished. 

All HOSE BUMPERS, fitting pegs - Gleason valve saddles, ladder brackets- 

EQUIFMENT BOXED, ETC, MANUFACTURED ANd/oR REPAIRED BY THE VARIOUS SUB-SHOPS 
WERE PAINTED AND INSTALLED. 

T HE BLACKSMITH SHOP (3 BLACKSMITHS) MANUFACTURED ANd/oR REPAIRED ALL 
HEAVY METAL BRACKETS, FITTINGS, ETC., REQUIRED ON FIRE APPARATUS. ThEY 

played a major part in rebuilding the hose tender and repaired all broken 
or damaged truck frames, suspension systems, etc. 

The upholstery and leather shop (1 upholsterer) manufactured and/or 
repaired all leather belting, canvas and hypolon covers, special gaskets and 
apparatus and furniture upholstery. 

- 17 - 



TRUCK SHOP 

This shop is responsible for the major maintenance and repair of a 
wioe variety of trucks and complex motorized equipment operated by the 
many City departments and bureaus. The Shop is staffed with 11 automotive 
machinists, 2 AUTOMOTIVE servicemen and supervised by automotive machinist 
Foreman (L.T.) Joseph Frisella. 

This shop completed 1451 jobs during the year with the accent on 
completion of all required work on the unit when brought into the shop for 
a specific mechanical defect. 

68 trucks and motorized units purchased by the City, as new or re- 
placement, WERE INSPECTED, ACCEPTED AND OUTFITTED FOR SERVICE. An EQUAL 
NUMBER OF "TURN-IN" UNITS WERE STRIPPED AND PREPARED FOR DISPOSAL SALE. 



The Quint Street Service Station, under-the supervision of this Shop, 
dispensed 127,190 gallons of gasoline and serviced g2k vehicles; while the 
Nineteenth Avenue Service Station pumped 5^130*+ gallons of fuel and serviced 
124 heavy trucks and sweepers. 



MACH INE SHOP 

During this fiscal lyear a total of 603 jobs of various descriptions 

WERE WRITTEN BY THIS SECTION OF CENTRAL SHOPS. In ADDITION TO THE REGULAR 
JOBS THAT WERE DONE BY THE MACHINE SHOP, A TOTAL OF 80 SEPARATE JOBS WERE 
PERFORMED BY THIS SHOP IN THE COMPLETION OF REPAIRS OF EQUIPMENT THAT WERE 
SENT THROUGH THE FlRE SHOP, TRUCK ShOP, AND AUTO SHOP. 

The Machine Shop consists of 9 maintenance machinists and 1 maint- 
enance Ma ch i n i st. For eman , Mr. John J. Raos. 

The areas in which this sub shop of the Central Shops renders a 
service are in the Public Schools. The repairing and overhauling of 
machinery related to heating of the school building as well as the servic- 
ing OF ALL HAND TOOLS, MACHINE TOOLS, ANO PRINTING PRESSES, IN THE 

Industrial Arts section of the Board of Education. 

The sewage treatment system in the treatment of sewage and waste re- 
quires THE SERVICE OF THE MACHINE SHOP IN KEEPING IN REPAIR ALL PUMPS, 
BLOWERS, VACUUM SYSTEMS, HYDRAULIC CONTROLS, AND FILTERS AND DRIERS. 

THE REPAIRING OF THE OPENING MECHANISM OF ALL FIRE HOUSE DOORS, 

ALL VALVES, HYDRAULIC VALVES, PIPES AND PUMPS THAT ARE A PART OF THE FIRE 

FIGHTING EQUIPMENT IN THE FlRE DEPARTMENT ARE SERVICED BY THE MACHINE SHOP 
SECTION. 

THE HIGH PRESSURE WATER SYSTEM, IN PROVIDING WATER NECESSARY TO FIGHT 
FIRES IN THE 6 I TY , REQUIRES THE SERVICE OF THE MACHINE ShOP IN THE REPAIR 

of all fire hydrants and all the machinery and pumps in the two large 
pumping station in this system. 

The hose and broom sho p is a sub-section of the machine shop. This 
area is required to i n s p e c t , r e p a i r , and distribute all fire hose, repair 
all fire extinguishers, breathing oxygen valves, controls, and fittings. 

Over 35,000 feet of in-service fire hose was inspected, tested, re- 
paired AND SENT BACK TO THE F|RE COMPANIES. 

The REFILLING OF GUTTER BROOM CORES, USED ON THE MECHANICAL STREET 

sweepers throughout the c i ty , is accomplished in this sub-section of the 
Machine Shop. 



19- 



RE CRJATION AND PARK AUTOMOTIVE SHOP 

This Shop, located in the Maintenance Yard area of Golden Gate Park, 
is staffed with three automotive machinists, one automotive serviceman and 

IS SUPERVISED 8Y Mr . JAMES ElLIOT, AUTOMOTIVE MACHINIST FOREMAN. 

A RECENT UP-DATED INVENTORY SHOWS A TOTAL OF 387 UNITS OF AUTOMOTIVE 
EQUIPMENT OPERATED BY THE RECREATION AND pARK DEPARTMENT AND SERVICED AND 
REPAIRED IN THIS SHOP. 

THIS INCLUDES 133 CARS, TRUCKS AND TRACTORS AND 2^>k UNITS OF FARM 
TYPE POWER EQUIPMENT SUCH AS MOWERS, R TO - T I L L E R S , BRUSH CHIPPERS, PUMPS, 
ETC . 

IT WAS AGAIN NECESSARY TO AUGMENT SHOP FUNDS TOWARDS THE END OF THE 
FISCAL YEAR SO THAT THE BACKLOG OF REQUIRED REPAIRS COULD BE REDUCED AND 
THE MAXIMUM OF EQUIPMENT BE MADE AVAILABLE TO RECREATION AND PARK CREWS 
FOR THE HEAVY SUMMER WORKLOAD. 

WE MUST, AGAIN, UNDERLINE THE FACT THAT THIS SHOP IS UNDERSTAFFED 
FOR THE VOLUME OF WORK REQUIRED OF IT. The PREPONDERANCE OF MOTORIZED 

equipment used by park department employees, the severe service that it 
is subjected to, and the lack of a replacement program all requires main- 
tenance and repairs in excess of the ability of the shops limited crew. 

The end result is excessive equipment down time ano lack of avail- 
ability TO THE OPERATING CREWS. 



20 - 



HALL OF JUSTICE SERVICE STATION 

This branch of the Central Shops is located on Bryant Street, west 
of the Hall of Justice. It provides fuel and service to Police Depart- 
ment VEHICLES AND SUPPLIES GASOLINE AND OIL TO OTHER ClTY VEHICLES. THE 

Station is operated 7 days a week from 7 a.m. to midnight and is staffed 

WITH 8 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICEMEN, 1 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICEMAN SUB-FOREMAN (Mr. 

Robert Desmond), 2 automotive mechanics and one automotive mechanic sub- 
Foreman (Mr. Howard Gettle). 

The convenient down -town location and the accelerated useage of Police 
vehicles continue this station as a high volume distribution point of 
fuel and lubricants for clty vehicles. 

The past year shows the following services performed: 

Gasoline dispensed 5^+2, 613 

Oil d i spensed 16,821 

Tow jobs 1 ,221 

Tires changed (new U recaps) 2,88^ 

Batteries serviced (new or charge) 63*+ 

Lube and service jobs 2,079 

Mechanical Repairs 6,389 

Motorcycle service 

Lubed 602 

Tires changed 173 

Batter i es 139 

Repairs 287 



- 2l 



P. P.',-;. - ARMY STREET STATION 

The Preventive Maintenance Program is now in its second year of 
operation. This service is performed from 3: 30 P.M. to 12:00 P.M. when 
most vehicles are not in service. 

The Preventive Maintenance Program is a systematic examination, ad- 
justment AND REPAIR OF THE OPERATING PARTS OF A MOTOR VEHICLE. PuRING 
THE INSPECTION ALL IMPORTANT PARTS, SUCH AS BRAKES, CLUTCH, STEERING, 
LIGHTS AND TIRES, ARE CHECKED. ThESE ARE VITAL TO SAFE AND TROUBLE FREE 
SERVICE. 

PURING THIS YEAR 1 , 61 9 VEHICLES HAVE RECEIVED THIS INSPECTION. OF 
THE 1,619 VEHICLES RECEIVING THIS INSPECTION 296 DEFECTS WERE CORRECTED. 

71 VEHICLES WITH DEFECTS OF A SERIOUS NATURE WERE SENT TO CENTRAL SHOPS 
FOR REPAIRS. 

IN ADDITION TO THE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE PROGRAM, THE FUELING OF ALL 
P.P.W. VEHICLES IS DONE. ThIS REQUIRED 288 , 5&6 GALLONS OF GASOLINE. OlL 

of both 10-30 Multi-Viscosity and SmE 30 used was 3j659 gallons. Kerosene 
pumped for p.p.w. use was 1^,007 gallons. 



Jobs completed on the day shift at Army Street Station were 1959« 
These jobs include the servicing of sewer lamps, lawn mowers, compressors 
an d pump repa irs. 

This year we have install ed , i n to our water system, an automatic 

METERING DEVICE FOR THE PRODUCT OF "STA-ClEAn" WHICH TREATS ALL AUTOMOTIVE 
COOLING SYSTEMS FOR RUST AND CORROSION. 



- 22 - 



Again the Central Shops took advantage of the availability of tech- 
nical TRAINING AND REFRESHER COURSES SO THAT OUR MECHANICS AND CRAFTSMEN 

might keep up with the advances in the automotive industry. 

Generally, the equipment maintained by the Central Shops is becoming 
larger, more sophisticated in their capabilities, and more complex in their 

MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR REQUIREMENTS. On TOP OF THIS, THE USING DEPARTMENTS 

are facing accelerated demands for their services, are putting their auto- 
motive equipment to greater and more severe use, and, in many cases, ex- 
panding the size of their fleet. 

The Fire Department fleet is a good example of the case in point. 
Fire alarms have almost doubled in the past several years. Apparatus re- 
sponse TO FIRES IS UP 36% IN THE PAST THREE YEARS. 

This useage coupled with the operation of a profusion of over ace 
apparatus in a clty with the greatest traffic density in the country has 
put a burden on the shops that cannot be properly carried with its very 
limited staff of employees. 

to alleviate this situation we continue to recommend an extension of 
the Preventive Maintenance and Inspection Program in areas where it now 

CAN ONLY RECEIVE MINIMUM ATTENTION (SPECIFICALLY THE FlRE SHOP, FaRK ShOP, 
AND PORTIONS OF THE AuTO Shop) ALONG WITH THE REQUIRED MANPOWER. 

In ADDITION, WE STRONGLY URGE that a firm and reasonable replacement 
program for automotive equipment be agreed upon and implemented. 

The present system of operating over-age, worn out, ano obsolete 
automotive equipment is extremely wasteful both in the cost of repairs to 
such units and the excessive down time involved for the equipment and its 
operators. 

Last year the average age of general use automobiles and light trucks 
disposed of by the clty was nine (9) years. 

Private industry has recognized that automotive equipment has a 
limited economical life span. most governmental agencies agree with this 
concept. New York City is initiating a program of replacement in two 

YEARS. 

Many cities are coordinating the responsibility of this essential 

TRANSPORTATION OPERATION WITHIN A SINGLE BUREAU OR DEPARTMENT. ThAT 
DIVISION ACQUIRES THE VEHICLES AND THEN "LEASES 11 THEM TO THE USING DEPART- 
MENTS FOR A FLAT PERIODICAL FEE THAT WOULD INCLUOE OPERATING EXPENSES AND 
A DEPRECIATION FACTOR. At THE END OF A PREDETERMINED USEFUL LIFE A 
RESERVE FUND HAS BEEN ACCUMULATED FOR REPLACEMENT. 

In CONCLUSION WE ARE PLEASED TO REPORT THAT THE CENTRAL ShOPS IS 

operating within its budget allotment in an efficient and productive 
manner. The Shops are modern in concept and are staffed by highly 



- 23 



SKILLED ANO ENERGETIC CRAFTSMEN. EVERY EFFORT IS MADE TO PROVIDE THESE 
EMPLOYEES WITH MODERN TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT SO THAT THEY MIGHT QUICKLY AND 
ACCURATELY DIAGNOSE AND REPAIR THE VEHICLES ASSIGNED TO THEIR CARE AND 
RETURN THEM TO SERVICE AT THE EARLIEST POSSIBLE TIME. 



24 - 



Number of City-owned vehicles by Department 
Per IBM Inventory run as of June 30, 1968 



DEPT 

NC DEPARTMENT 

111 Adult F robat i on 

115 ASSESSOR 

117 C I TY ATTORNEY 

119 City Planning 

123 Controller 

131 Disaster Corps. 

141 District Attorney 

1^5 Fire Department 

151 Mayor 

161 Police Department 

1d5 Public Defender 

169 Public Welfare 

170 Single Men's Rehab 
173 Sheriff 
181 Supervisors 
185 Probation Office 

187 Log Cabin Ranch School 

188 Hidden Valley Ranch Sch 
213 Calif. Academy of Sci. 
221 Chief Admin. Officer 
223 Coroner 
233 Dept. of Elect. 
243 Public admin, 
245 3eal Estate 
255 Registrar of Voters 
261 Tax coll ect . -Gen . Off„ 
265 Weights <* Measures 

311 Purch. -Main Office 

312 Purch. -Shops 

DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS 

^13 Arch itecture 

415 Bldg. Inspection 

415.1 Federal Aid 
417 Bldg . Repair 

417.2 Traffic Painting 
421 Engineering 

423 General Office 

424 Personnel Aomin. 

425 Sewage Pumping Sta. 
427 Sewage Treat. Plant. 
429 Sewer Repair Div. 

431 St. Cln. Repair autos 



NO. OF 


DEPT 


NO 


. OF 


VEH ICLES 


NO 


DEPARTMENT VEHICLES 


7 
2 


DEP 


ARTMENT OF PU9LIC HEALTH 




513 


Adm I N I STRAT I ON 


5 


2 


525 


Plague Surveillance 


1 


2 


527 


Dairy & Milk Inspect. 


14 


1 

5 
4 


531 


Food cx Sanitary Inspect 


.15 


535 


Health Centers 


5 


539 


Public Health Nursing 


1 


270 


551 


Emergency Hospitals 


16 


4 


553 


Hassler Hosp I TAL 


9 


270 

2 

if] 


555 


Laguna Honda Hosp. 


9 


557 


S.F. Gen'l. Hospital 


8 


561 


Mental Admin. 


1 


2 


567 


Mental Inst. Service 


1 


37 














3 

14 


611 


Legion of Honor 


1 


5 

. 2 

6 

1 

4 


621 


DeYoung Museum 


1 


631 


L i brary 


6 


651 


Rec ix Park General 


133 


651s 


Rec & Park Service 


25^ 


661A 


C i ty College 


2 


35 
3 
1 
1 


661B 


John • Connell 


1 


661E 


Shop Trucks 


9 


661F 


Gardeners, autos, etc. 


15 


661G 


Del i very Trucks 


15 


4 

9 
4 


661H 


Adm I N I STRAT I ON 


4 


Dl 


EPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 


38 


681 


Street Repair 


94 




683 


Traffic Engineering 


18 




686 


Street Tree Plant. 


28 



9 

43 

5 

96 

24 

25 

2 

3 

2 

23 

118 

104 



TOTaL 
Police Motorcycles 



GRaND total 



1899 
169 



206: 






25 - 







Fire Department Hose Tender modernized and installed on new 
chassis by Fire Shop. 




Central Shops maintenance machinist repairing lift mechanism 
or Islais Creek Bridge 




Log Cabin Ranch tractor receiving paint job after complete 
mechanical overhaul in the truck shop. estimated extended 
life of unit five (5) years. 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU 



The Blueprint end Reproduction Department provides reproduction services, 
namely Photography, Offset Printing, Mimeographing, Photostating, Blueprinting 
and Electrostatic Copier Printing to all city departments. 

Work performed during 1967-68 amounted to i 1 50,570, an increase of 
$31,500 over the last three-year period. 

The Bureau is administered by a Blueprint anu Reproduction Manager with 
a staff of ten employees. 

Personnel Room 50, Basement, City Hall 

Blueprint and Reproduction Manager 
Senior Offset Machine Operator 
Offset Machine Operator 
Photo-Lithographer 
Senior Blueprint Operator 
Blueprint Machine Operators 
Photostat Operator 
Photostat Operator - part time 
Senior Account Clerk 
Photographer - as needed 



Equ 



pment 



42" Blueprint Machine 

42" Ammonia Process Machines 

19" x 23" Prccess copy camera 

14" x 17" Offset Duplicating Machine 

10'' x 14" Offset Duplicating Machine 

26" Power Cutter 

S{"' x 14" Mimeograph Machines 

10" x 24" Photostat Machine 

13'' x 24'' Electrostatic Printer (prints from 

m i c ro f i I m ) 
Microfilm Machines (I 35mm and I 16mm) 
Power Driven Book Stapler 



IMPROVEMENTS 



During this year, one of the mimeograph duplicators was replaced. 



STUDIES 

In the next fiscal year, new equipment will be added, which will save 
the city departments in material and labor costs. 



- 27 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU (Continues) 



Major Recurring Functions cf the Reproduction Bureau 



Al I Departments 

Various Departments (20) 

City Attorney 

Board of Supervisors 

Purchasi ng 

Treasurer 

Recr^ati^n & Park 



Public Works, Engineering, 
Bureau of Archi tecture, 
Recreation 4 Park, SFUSD 



Departmental Budget Estimates 

Annual Reports 

Opinions & other Legal Papers 

Calendars ana Ordinances 

Bids, Specifications & Purchasing Records 

Microfilm Records cf Checks Deposited 

Specifications for Construction, 
Maintenance and Repair of Buildings, 
Parks and Recreational Facilities 

Contract sets cf Blueprints for Construc- 
tion, Maintenance and Repair of Public 
Buildings, Streets, Sewers and Recrea- 
tional Faci I it ies 



Public Wcrks, City Attorney -SFUSD Photography in connection with Construc- 
tion, Frogress, Earth Slides, Accidents, 
Redevelopment and Planning 

Assessor, Public Works, Real Estate, Blueprinting of Block Maps of the City 
Recorder, Tax Collector, Purcnasing and County ^f San Francisco 

In aoaition to the major functions listed apove the bureau performs many 
hundreds of nonrecurring jobs for City departments. The greater part of this 
work is of an urgent nature anc deadlines set by ordinance; advertised dates 
for bids and the normal requirements of departments' deadlines which must be 
met. 



- 28 



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DOLLAR DISTRIBUTION 
FISCAL YEAR 1967-68 




APPENDIX 



General 
Education 
health 
UTi I ities 



TABLE NO. I 
PURCHASE ORDERS PROCESSED 



1960-1967 






Purchase 






Orders 




Amount 


15,429 


3 7 


,325,928 


8,151 


4 


,216,464 


6,200 


3 


,673,963 


5,859 


4 


,361 ,563 


35,669 


$19 


,597,916 





1967-1968 


Purchase 




Orders 


Amount 


15,334 


$ 7,183,008 


9,900 


4,785,608 


6,369 


3,747,103 


5,636 


3,28o,OI4 



TOTALS 35,669 $19,597,916 37,439 $19,001,733 



Purchases by 

Encumbrance 

Requests $23,695,209 $22,398,420 



TOTAL $43,293,127 $41,400,153 



TABLE NO. 2 

EXPENDITURES 

Comparison of expenditures with original bJdget for 
all operating appropriations except Personal Services for 1967-1968. 

Encumbered 
Account Budgeted & Expended Surp I us Def icit 



Contractual Services 
7.31 1.200.000 


S 


11,944 


$ 


15,565 




$ 3,621 


Materials & Supp 
7.31 1.300.000 


1 ies 




15,430 




16,933 




1,503 


Equipment 
7.311.400.000 






2,455 




2,037 


S 413 




Premium-Official 
7. 315. 812. 31 1 


Bonds 




6,434 




6,031 


403 




Premium-Auto Insurance 
7. 315. 813. 31 1 




40,000 




32,395 


7,605 




Membership Dues 
7.311.800.000 




$ 


6.128 

82,391 


$ 


6.295 
79,256 




167 


TOTALS 


$ 8,426 


$ 5,291 










REVENUE 







Comparison of Revenues vjth Estimated Revenues- 1 967-1968 

Over Under 
Estimated Estimated 



S 94 



303 



S 732 

TOTALS S 11,000 511,335 $ 397 $ 732 





Estimated 


Ac- ii a 1 


Account 


Revenue 


Revjnue 


Sale of Documents 






7061 


I 1 ,500 


J 1,106 


Minor Sales 






7062 


7,000 


6,6'T7 


Sales of Grease 






7621 


2.500 


3,23;; 














' 




t 





































SHOP EXPEND ITUR ES 
COMPARISON OF 1967-68 DIRECT CHmRGES WITH PRIOR YEAR 1966-67 



1 . PERSONNEL S ERVICES 

Administrative Salaries 

Wages 

Retirement 

Work Orders 



1 967-68 

$12,780 

680,801 

8,132 

108,105 



1 966-67 

£ 11,856 

6^9,2^+7 

7,033 

98,972 

$76^,108 



2 . CONTRACTUAL SERV ICES 

Original Appropriation 
By Transfer 

Less Unexpended 
Total Expenditures 



S105,69*+ 


$ 9^,576 


52, 1M* 

157,838 


75,^30 

170,006 


8,088 


21,^33 


S 1^9,750 


i 1^8,573 



3 . MAT ERIALS AND SUPPLIES 

Original Appropriation 
By Transfer 



Less Unexpended 
Total Expenditures 



TOTAL SERV ICES 



.19^,961 


te 192,916 


10,000 


- - 


^204,961 


$ 192,916 


315 


308 


$ 20^,6^6 


% 192,608 


;i,i64,2i*t 


11,108,289 



ENTS 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

ANNUAL REPORT 



FISCAL YEAR 1968-69 



September, 1969 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
270 CITY HALL 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 94102 



September 18, 1969 



Annual Report 
Fiscal Year I 9b6-69 



Mr. Thomas J . Mel Ion 

Chief Aami nistrati ve Officer 

289 City Hal I 

Dear Mr. Mel Ion: 

The annual report of the Purchasing Department for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1969 is nerewith respectfully submitted. 

As stated in detail in the report the department expended $19,341,432 by 
35,108 purchase orders and $38,769,403 by encumbrance requests; maintained 
25 storerooms and sold $62,093 surplus City property. The Central Shops 
furnished services in tne amount of $1,249,250. Reproduction Bureau fur- 
nished services in the amount of $162,875. 

Continued effort is being made by bureaus to give departments faster and 
better service. 

Tne following statements on the activities of the department for tne past 
fiscal year answer the specific inquiries of the Mayor to all departments, 
dated September 3, 1969. 

1. There were no capital programs in progress during the year. 

2. Recommendations on the activities of the department, as stated 
in the annual report include: 

a) Establish specification and control system for buying on 
a fu II -time bas is . 

b) Continue expansion of the vehicle management system. With 
your assistance and the cooperation of the budget reviewing 
authorities significant progress has been made in a pre- 
ventive maintenance program. No additional personnel was 
provided for the 1968-69 fiscal year. 

c) Determine areas in which Federal and State financial 
assistance is available and may be advantageously expended. 



Mr. Thomas J. Mellon - 2 - September 18, 1969 

Chief Administrative Officer 

3. The comparison of expenditures for all appropriations other 
than those for personal services with original budget appro- 
priations for 1968-69 is given in the appendix, annual report. 
Funds for departments' activities are obtained mainly by trans- 
fers from budget appropriations of other departments. 

4. The comparison of revenues with revenues estimated in the 
budget of 1968-69 is given in the appendix, annual report. 

5. The budget appropriations of other departments for automotive 
and other equipment services, and for reproduction services 
should be increased yearly to compensate for the increase in 
work required, and for steadily increasing labor and material 
costs. 1969-70 replacement of vehicles which have reached the 
end of their economically useful life was sharply curtailed. 
Funds for automotive maintenance and repairs, already insuf- 
ficient, will be seriously affected by the high maintenance 
costs of worn-out vehicles. 

6. The statistics on work accomplished are given in the annual 
report. 

Two factors are expected to significantly affect the operations of this depart- 
ment during 1969-70 as follows: 

1. New purchase forms, to be put into use shortly will speed up 
the purchase function with no increase in personnel. 

2. Deletion of requested funds and unavailability of personnel 
for EDP services has brought to a close the studies regarding 
best application of this service as to purchasing and related 
functions. Every effort will be made to secure funds and 
personnel to reinstate "these studies which will result in 
benefits to a I I departments. 

A backlog of unpaid invoices was temporarily cleared up by overtime, temporary 
personnel and reassignment of personnel. New purchase forms, above referred 
to, will alleviate this problem to some extent. However, the addition of the 
Port Commission to those activities we serve has further overburdened a limited 
staff. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your continuous support, 
encouragement and advice. The cooperation given me by my fellow workers and 
the generous response by other departments in certain instances to my requests 
for assistance have been gratifying. 

Very truly yours, 

T. F. CONWAY 
Purchaser of Supplies 



mNNUAL report 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment an- contractual 
services for all uepartments for the City anc County, inducing city-owned util- 
ities, anc the San Francisco Unified School District; repairs anc maintains auTo- 
motive and other equipment for the various departments, except Putlic UtiliTies, 
and for the School District as requested; operates a central reproduction bureau 
for departments requiring its services, transfers to other departments for use 
or sells equipment and supplies no longer useful to any uepartment of the city, 
maintains a perpetual inventory of equipment in the various departments; and 
operates central stores of the Purchasing and various otner departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments uy the Snops 
en equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of Buying on new products, 
specifications and prices. 

PERSONNEL 

Employments totaled 197 permanent in four bureaus. The Organization Chart 
is shown in the Appen-ix, 

SUPERVISORY - June 30, 1969 
Administrat i ve 

T. F. Conway - Purchaser of Supplies 
D. J . Hewartson - Secretary 

Bureaus 

Buy i nq 

J. C. Gavin - assistant Director of Purchasing & Services - Bureau Heac 

G. A. Clarke - Senior Purchaser 

C. J. Morissey - Cooing Supervisor (acting) 

Equipment anc Supplies 

J. H. Beck - Stores anc Equipment Supervisor - Bureau Hea_ 
J. A. Frantz - Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

Personal and Accounts 



George Ha r ley - Chief Clerk - bureau Head 
R. A. Davis - Principal Clerk 



Shops 



A. M. Flaherty - General Super i ntenjent of City Shops - Bureau heac 
E. A. Rames - Assistant Super i nte-ncent of City Shops 



Bureaus - Ccntinuoa 



SEPARATIONS: Retirements, Deaths 

The valueu services of the following were separated from City employment 
through retirement or death after years of meritorious accomplishment. 



NAME 
McDevitt, Katherine 
Ourney, Nathaniel E, 
Ca rey , J Ji n P . 
Canizales, Mark 



Pos it ion 
General Clerk Stenographer 
Auto Serviceman 
Storekeeper 
Car & Auto Painter 



Approx. years 
City Service 


Date 


46 




8-1-68 


26 




10-16-68 


20 




12-1-68 


14 




2-22-69 



Diod 



Petkcvich, Marie J. 



Maintenance Machinist 



8-23-68 



WORK ACCOMPLISHED 

The work accomplished in the fiscal year is described in more detail under 
the separate bureaus. 

Recapitulation is as follows: 






Bureau 


Unit 


1968-1969 




1967-1968 


Buy ing 


Purchase Orders 
Amount 


35,108 
$19,341,432 


37,439 
$19,001,733 




Encumbrance Requests 
Amount 


$38,769,403 


$22,398,420 


Stores & 

Equipment 


Surplus Sales - Amount 
Major Stores operated 


$62,093.19 
II 


$ 


99,015 
il 


Shops 


Job Orders 
Expend itures 


7,408 
$ 1,249,250 


$ 


7,164 
1,385,070 


Reproduction 


Services rendered 
Amount 


$ 162,875 


$ 


1 50 , 570 



2 - 



GENERAL COMMENTS 

The period covered by th is report, while not marked by material 
changes in facilities, procedures and methods, saw steady progress being 
made. 

The specification and control section, initiated to make studies 
which cannot bo done by present staff without curtailing and delaying 
service to other departments, continued on an intermittent basis because 
of lack of personnel. The need for expanding this function to full time 
is considered obvious in vi^w of continuing technological advances in 
processes, equipment, materials and supplies 



Studies by EDP personnel was done on a very limited basis and at ttu 
of the period had, for all practical purposes, ccme to a hafct. 

Activities of the Central Shops, Reproduction Bureau and the Bureau 
of Stores and Equipment are described ana commented on elsewhere in this 
report. The filling cf key positions with permanent personnel during 
the period of this report can be expected to be advantageous. 



BUREAU OF BUYING 

This Bureau, procures materials and supplies, equipment and insurance, 
and contracts for services, for all city departments and the San Francisco 
Unified School District. Except for term contracts based on .estimated 
quantities, all buying starts with receipt of requisition from using depart- 
ment. Included in or incidental to the procurement function are the follow- 
ing: (outlined in detail in a previous report) 

I . Buying - Bids and Awards 

Preparation of bids, including contractual -and technical require- 
ments; evaluation of bids; and award of bids. 

I I . Buying - Related Functions 

Analysis of records of average use; maintenance of specification 
file; new term contracts; and review of procedures. 

PERSONNEL 

The buying division is headed by the Assistant Director of Purchasing 
and Services and includes II assistant purchasers. The clerical staff, under 
the Bureau of Personnel and Accounts, is engaged in typing, mailing, opening 
and tabulating bids, maintaining bid index and speci ficat ions file, and 
typing contracts. Funds for some of these employments, both buying and cler- 
ical, are provided by other departments. 

Detailed employments are as follows: 

I Assistant Director of Purchasing anu Services 

1 Senior Purch aser 
7 Purchasers 

2 Purchasers (Printing) 
I Assistant Purchaser 

OPERATIONS 



Purchasing work is assigned on a commodity basis with allowance for 
items of a special nature or in cases where seasonal peaks or vacation period 
make it advisable to temporarily deviate from this policy. 

Periodic meetings of the buying staff permit the exchange of ideas, ex- 
planation of improved procedures and generally keep the assistant purchasers 
informed as to the overall progress and problems. 

Every effort is made to process requisitions as rapidly as possible but 
delays occur due to lack of personnel, inadequate information furnished with 
requisitions, and failure of departments to submit requisitions promptly for 
equipment items that are to be grouped for purchase for purposes of standard- 
ization and economy. 



- 4 - 



BUREAU OF BUYING - Continue 

OPERATIONS - Continued 

In preparing requisitions, departments are requested to furnish informa- 
tion that will indicate a standard of overall quality and usefulness suitable 
fcr actual use requirements an- permit competition as requiroo by the Charter 
ana Administrative Code. A new form was revised for this purpose making it 
easier for departments to furnish desirable information for bid purposes. 

As time is available personnel are assigned to: 

1. Review specifications, forms and proceGures. 

2. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing 
additional term contracts for articles an u services where 
des i rable. 

The neoc for a separate section to expand the above services is apparent 
if the department is to most efficiently eno effectively perform its purchas- 
ing functions. This w^tk is new being done „n an intermittent basis as time 
Is available. Every effort should be mace to procure a full-time employment 
for th is work. 

Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into fcr various servico 
and commodities in general use by several departments or recurring use by a 
department. The main advantages are elimination of the time lag resulting 
when individual bioS are requester and elimination of the cost involved in 
individual bids. 

New term contracts initiated during the year induce: 

1 . Debris box Service. 

2. Uniform Service - San Francisco Airport. 

3. Disposing of filter cake - Sewage Treatment Plant. 

In acditi^n to these new term contracts, old Contracts are constantly 
being revisoo, specifications up-cated, no longer requires items coletec 
and new items acded. 

So-me Purchases ~r contracts of an unusual nature or major outlay include 
the fol lowing: 

He I i copter 

Crushed Rock Processing Plant 

Cleaning Machine, Ultras_nic 

Video Tapo System 

Cardiac Monitor 

Motor Coaches 

Motion Picture Film Inspecting Machine 

Snow Veh icle 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS 

George Harley - Chief Clerk 
Robert A. Davis - Principal Clerk 

Traveling Monthly Repetitive Purchase Orders are processed 
Requisitions: on Computyper Tape. Large numbers of requisitions 

as used by Public Health, Public Utilities, Library, 
Purchasing, Recreation & Park, Sheriff, Public Works, 
Schoois, anu Controller. 

Friden Additional bids and Purchase Orders were done on 

Equipment: these machines during the past year. We have reached 
capacity of Computyper use for Traveling Requisitions 
and are at Computyper capacity for other purchase 
orders . 

Tabulation of Microfilming of bids on Contract Proposals and 
bids: Quotation continued. 

Requisition Cumulative weekly and monthly, as well as daily, 
Register: runs of this register have been continued. It is 

indispensable in locating requisitions processed 

for Purchase Order. 

Veneor Index: Continued. 

Codes on Purchase Use of Veneor Location Code, buyer Coce, and Corn- 
Orders: modify Code continued. 

Bid Index: Continued. 

Preparation of 

Purchase Orders: We are continuing to make up sets of Purchase Orders 

on a random basis as we have found this an excellent 
way to expedite issuance of purchase orders. 

The number of purchase orders to be prepared is not Constant chiefly 
due to the fact that requisitions do not flow into the department in a 
uniform manner. Consequently, there are times when a high production may 
be desired when personnel is uepleted by variations (which cannot be 
spread over the normal vacation periou due to conditions beyond our con- 
trol) sickness, or otherwise. Our very limited temporary funds must be 
used in even more critical areas and at more critical times. It is hoped 
that sufficient funcs for the temporary employments will be provided in 
the future. 

Sales of Charters, Cooes an u other documents amounted to $11,345. 

Discounts earned amounted to $73,216.18 or 98.3$. 



- 6 - 



CODING DIVISION 



The Coding Division, under the Bureau of Buying, continues the 
development of the material and supplies coding system. The system 
is now in use Dy all requisitioning departments. 

Many new codes have been developed and assigned to the Railway. 
They will identify the replacement parts that will be needed to 
maintain the newly acquired passenger coaches. Other codes have been 
developed for the Port Commission. 

At present the division is cooperating with the personnel from tht 
EDP section of the Water Department and the Railway. Tney are in the 
process of combining their inventory control systems, which in the 
future will be controlled by the Water Department. Since both systems 
used the Purchaser's codes, the process was simplified. 

The divisien is also actively involved with the School Depart- 
ment's Division of Supplies. We are in the experimental stages of 
methods and procedures to bring about a system that will expedite the 
processing of future schocl purchase oraers . 

Due to the many requests for new ccd- numbers, and the cancel- 
lation of certain codes by departments, constant changes and addi- 
tions are being made. The departments affected by these changes are 
notified. Revised code catalogs, anc a new improved index are planner 
for the future. 

At our request, departments Continue to send personnel f^r per- 
sonal instruction in coding procedures. We favor this action and have 
plans for future method of instruction. 



- 7 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT 



The Bureau of Stores and Equipment operates and maintains a central 
warehouse and storerooms in various City departments! receives and issues 
materials, supplies and equipment for all departments of the City and County of 
San Francisco; and makes miscellaneous emergency purchases for the account of the 
various agencies* This Bureau arranges for the sale of and sells surplus and 
obsolete personal property belonging to the City; exchanges equipment between 
departments, maintains a perpetual inventory of all meterials purchased for the 
City and County of San Francisco, and inventory of all materials purchased for the 
City and County of San Francisco, and makes periodic checks of such property c The 
Bureau maintains control of the entire automotive fleet, including the listing, 
insurance and the reporting of all accidents. 



The following locations are staffed and operated by the Bureau of 
Stores and Equipment: 



Name and Location 



Central V/arehouse - 15th & Harrison Sts. 



Type 



Amount of Inventory 



Stationery 
Janitorial Supplies 
1+000 Cases Foodstuffs 
Misc. Furniture 
Pipe, etc. 



Dept. Public Works 
Water Department 
Hetch Hetchy 
S.F. Intl. Airport 
Municipal Railway 



Health Dept. 



Social Services 

Recreation & Park 

Dept. Electricity 

Sheriff 

Central Shop Store 



- 2323 Army St. 

- 1990 Newcomb Ave„ 
«- Moccasin, Calif. 

- So. San Francisco 

- 24th & Utah Sts., and 
2 sub-stores 
General Store) 
Washington & Mason) 

- Elkton Yard (Bond Fund) 

- Potrero and one sub-store. 

- S. F. General Hospital, 
22nd & Potrero 

- Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th & Dewey 

- Hassler Hospital, Redwood City 

- Single Mens" Rehabilitation Center, 
Redwood City 

- Golden Gate Park 

- 901 Rankin St. 

- Hall of Justice Garage (Sub-Store) 



7,829.22 
4,97^.08 



538,071.00 

45,086.00 

23,579.31 

182,489.64 



285,^07.07 

27,638.55 

104, 088.70 

330,327.95 

268,198.26 

3,000.72 

43,426.48 
33,520.88 
66,839. C9 
30,446.88 



* Storage only - Amount included with departmental inventory. 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 

PERSONNEL 

The Sales, Inventory and Stores Division is staffed by the following; 

1 Stores and Equipment Supervisor 

1 Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

1 Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

1 Senior Clerk-Typist 

2 Inventory Clerks 

11 Senior Storekeepers 

21 Storekeepers (plus 1 Storekeeper on work order) 
8 Assistant Storekeepers 
1 Laborer 
TOTAL i+7 



SALES DIVISIOM 

Fifteen sales were conducted during the fiscal year under the authority 
of Section 88 of the Charter. Sales activities included legal research into 
various aspects of different sales, preparation of sales, inviting interested 
buyers to bid, opening and awarding of bids, collecting and depositing all money 
received from buyers with the City Treasurer and keeping records of correspondence 
relative to the sales. 

The total revenue from the sales of 1968-69 wass $62,093.19. A general 
breakdown of the sales is as follows; 

X-Ray Film $ 882.99 

Block Books 105,00 

Auto & Trucks 30,320, 2a 

Addressograph Machines 630.00 

Validating & Receipting Machines 125.00 

Battery Parts 600.00 

Scrap Metal 26,366.95 

Impendance Relays 126<>00 

Waste Paper 1,5^6. M* 

Grease & Bones 3^7.13 

Sacks & Containers 361.98 

Motor & Trolley Coach Shells 681.50 

TOTAL $62,093.19 



- 9 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



INVENTORY DIVISION 



This division has participated in job training programs with Social 
Services, Neighborhool Youth Corp a , and State Department of Employment - "WIN" 
Program. Provides work schedules, evaluations, training opportunities through 
clerical duties for both men and women. Men, as Inventory field men, warehouse 
men, etc. Women, as Clerk-Typist. We have also been successful in acquiring 
outside employment, supplementing their on the job training, with earned wages 
plus additional experience. 

During the fiscal year, we directed and negotiated all the City's 
moving requirements. Set up procedures, secured estimates, met and conferred 
with Moving Contractor and Department Heads. Hetch Hetchy-Engineers, Human 
Rights, Superior Court, Municipal Court, and Disaster Corp, were among the many 
departments dealt with. 

The duties of surveying the equipment budget, for new and replaced 
equipment, the transfer of surplus, useable equipment to various City Departments, 
are functions of this division. Last year, we rehabilitated and transferred 
equipment to various Departments, resulting in a savings of $25,000, inventory 
book value. 

The directing and accumulation of waste material, such as scrap metal, 
waste paper, I.B.M. tab cards, X-Ray film, and other miscellaneous saleable 
items were gathered and disposed of by sale. 

The maintenance of the equipment inventories on a "perpetual basis", 
and the values thereof, on all City Departments; prescribing the manner in which 
department heads shall report loss of or damage to equipment! the manner in which 
adjustments are to be made, are handled by this Division. 



- 10 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



STORES DIVISION 

This past year showed some changes in personnel. A very worthy and 
efficient 193*+ Storekeeper retired and a long time, very capable 1936 Senior 
Storekeeper was also lost to us, by retirements 

A 193^ Storekeeper who was a great help to our group left us to accept 
an appointment as a 7^6U Voting Machine Adjuster. An L. T. 1932 Assistant 
Storekeeper left us by transfer to the Board of Education for a Permanent 1932 
Assistant Storekeeper appointment. 

We were very fortunate to obtain from Civil Service lists, two new 
capable 193*+ Storekeepers and one of our very able 193^ Storekeepers received 
a promotion to 1936 Senior Storekeeper, 

The continuous addition and revision of the coding system of ordering, 
inventory control and issuing of materials and supplies has greatly improved the 
operations of the storerooms. 

Plans are going ahead for the new storeroom building at the San Francisco 
International Airport, due to the rapid expansion, of the Airport facilities^ 

The anticipation of the storeroom personnel at the 2^th and Utah Sts. 
Bus Repair Shops finally was a reality as the long awaited 200 new buses started 
arriving, 

A modern office was built and parts of the storeroom renovated, at the 
Muni Railway General Store, making for a more efficient operation. 

The Senior Storekeeper at the San Francisco General Hospital, was 
contacted regarding storeroom facilities for the new hospital which will be built 
in the near future. 

Lost time due to injuries was kept to a minimum by a continuing safety 
program. Various storekeeping personnel attended classes in Defensive Driving 
and Safety Methods. 

The Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor was invited to serve 
as a member on two of the Qualifications Appraisal Panels for the California 
State Personnel Board, 



- II - 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Rep reduction Bureau provides a centre I i zed service available 
tc all City Departments in photography, offset printing, mimeographing, 
photostating, blueprinting, microfilming and two sel f-serv;ce electro- 
static cop iers . 

Funcs to operate the department are provided by budget transfer 
ano work orders from over 70 departments who make regular use of its 
facilities. Work done for city departments during 1968-69 amounted to 
$162,875. This is an increase of over $45,000 in the last four years, 
with the same number of personnel. 

The bureau is administered by a Reproduction Manager with a staff 
of 10 employees. 

Personnel 



Sr. Account Clerk 
Sr. Offset Machine Operator 
Sr. Blueprint Machine Operator 
Offset Machine Operator 
2 Blueprint Machine Operators 
Photostat Operator 
Photo-Lithographer 
Photographer (pert time) 
Clerk 

Equipment 

42" Mach ine 

42" Ammonia Process Machines 

I9"x23" Process Copy Camera 

I4"xl7" Offset Duplicating Machine 

I0"xl4" Offset Duplicating Machine 

8i"xl4" Mimeograph Machines 

26j" Power Cutter 

Power Wire Stitcher 

I6"x24 n Photostat Machine 

I8"x24" Electrostatic Pr inter(prints from 35mm film) 

16mm two-sided microfilmer (new) 

35mm Planetary microfilmer 

irxl7" 10-station Collator & Stapler (new) 

M"xl7" Plastic Plate Maker (new) 

Il"xl7" Automatic Offset Duplicating Machine (new) 

Improvements 



The above (new) equipment has aided in better service to city departments 
and substantial ly save costs on work performed. 

Example - City Budget printing - Fiscal Year 1967-68 $ 5,443.00 

1 968-69 3,000.00 

Saving each year--$ 2,443.00 



- 12 - 




New plastic platemaker (above) and automatic offset press (below), 
placed in operation during the year, have saved the city substan- 
tial printing costs ana time. 




REPRODUCTION BUREAU (Continued) 



Major Recurring Functions of the Reproduction Bureau 



A I I Departments 

Various Departments (20) 

City Attorney 

Board of Supervisors 

Purchas ing 

Treasurer 

Recreation & Fark 



Puolic Works, Engineering, 
Bureau of Architecture, 
Recreajtlon & Park, SFUSD 



Fublic Works, City Attorney 
SFOSD 



Departmental Budget Estimates 
Departmental Final Buuget 

Annual Reports 

Opinions & other legal papers 

Calendars and Oruinances 

Bids, Specifications & Purchasing Records 

Microfilm Records of Checks Deposited 

Specifications for Construction, 
Maintenance and Repair of Builuings 
Parks and Recreational Facilities. 

Contract sets of Blueprints for Con- 
struction, Maintenance and Repair of 
Public Buildings, Streets, Sewers and 
Recreational Facilities. 

Photography in connection with Construc- 
tion, Progress, Earth Slides, Accidents, 
Redevelopment &nd Planning 



Assessor, PuLlic Works, Real Estate, Blueprinting of Block Maps of the City 
Recorder, Tax Collector, Purchasing and County of San Francisco. 

In addition to the major functions listed above the bureau performs 
many hundreds of non-recurring jobs for City departments. The greater part 
of this work is of an urgent nature and deadlines set by ordinance; adver- 
tised dates for bids and the normal requirements of departments' deadlines 
wh ich must be met. 



- 13 - 



BUREAU CF SHCP5 



The primary responsibility of this Bjreau is to provide maintenance, 
repair and service to the automotive fleet of the clty and county of san 
Francisco. 

The critical need for an efficiently maintained fleet of automotive 
vehicles cannot be over-stated. Without such equipment and service few 
City Departments could operate today. 

as a result, the central shops and allied facilities provide all 
necessary mechanical maintenance and repair service for all clty depart- 
MENTS and Bureaus (excepting Public Utilities). In addition, it is the 

RESPONSIBILITY OF THIS BUREAU TO INSPECT, APPRAISE AND MAKE RECOMMENDA- 
TIONS on all City owned vehicles contemplated for replacement; aid the . 
various departments in the writing of specifications; to receive and 
approve all new vehicles delivered to the City, and to outfit and prepare 
these vehicles for service. 

Administration ano major repair facilities are located at the Central 
Shops, 800 Quint Street. Other installations are: Golden Gate Fark Shop, 
providing maintenance for Recreation and Park Department equipment; Hall 
of Justice Service Station, where fuel and lubricants are provided for 
Police and other City cars; Army Street Station, providing fuel and pre- 
ventive maintenance service for DPW vehicles; as well as the 19^ Avenue 
Station; Health Department Garage; and Department of Electricity Yard. 




The Bureau is staffed with 101 employees. (See organization chart.) 

This past year saw two veteran employees of the Central Shops retire 
after many years of faithful service to the City. They are: 



Nathaniel Durney, 73*+3 Maintenance Machinist 
(October 15, 1968 - 28 years) 

Mark Canizales, 7309 Car and Auto Painter 
(February 21, 1969 - *\k years) 



ACCOUNTING 

Under the supervision of Edward Stone, Senior Management Assistant, 
The Shops' accounting personnel maintained a vigilant expenditure control 
over budgeted funds received from some seventy-three departments and sub- 
SIDIARY divisions in the City system. It also provided monthly statements 
indicating the status of expenditures and remaining balances for the 
quidance of management and shop supervision. 

in adoition, the accounting section prepared various tabulations of 
equipment serviced by central ^hops and its outlying installations? 
furnished using departments with periodic statements of expenditures tab- 
ulated by job and vehicle number as well as 8y accidents; and updateo in- 
formation relative to the publication of the annual inventory of equipment 
serviced by central shops. 

Moreover, this unit prepareo timerolls and computed direct labor, 
contractual and materials costs which establish the basis for job billing 
the using departments. 




the outstanding accident claims have been transferred to the c i ty * s 
Delinquent Revenue Bureau. Collections on them will go to enhance the 
coffers of the general fund. 



FIRE APPARATUS SHOP 

The Fire Shop is staffed with eight (8) automotive Machinists, one 
(1) Sub-Foreman Auto Machinist and one (1) Automotive Machinist Foreman, 
(Mr. Leonard Counihan). This shop completed 835 jobs, changed ~\6k batteries 
in the field, lubed and serviced 190 pieces of fire apparatus ano responded 
to 3030 field repair requests. 

a partial list of work done to fire apparatus includes: 

32 major engine overhauls 

91 engine repairs 

79 fire pump and related repairs 

46 small engine and motor repairs 

7^- chassis repairs (steering, mufflers, wheel align 

and frames) 
29 clutch replacements 
59 brake repairs (air valves, relines and compressors) 

35 transmission repairs 

21 differential and axle repairs 

36 road calls to make repairs 
79 major tune ups 

37 radiator repairs 
56 accidents repaired 
36 body repa i rs 

199 electrical repairs 

4 pieces of apparatus cannibalized 
6 booster tanks were openedand cleaned 
6 vehicles were outfitted for service: 
t (2) triple combinations, (1) aerial, 
(2) valve wagons and (1) crew truck 

Mod i f i cat i ons : 

Five (5) TC hose beds were completely rearranged and repiped. 

Eleven (11) mechanical fuel pumps removed and electric pumps with 

LOW DRAW solenoids INSTALLED. 

Seven (7) protective cabs installed. 
Installed new engine in Fire Boat Dinghy. 

LADDER SHOP : Staffed by two (2) Pattern Makers. 

Repaired and rebuilt 63 various size and type wood ladders, resized 
200 ladder rungs, make new patterns, modify and repair old patterns, re- 
pair furniture, made four (k) new roofing ladders, one (1) new boarding 
laoder, made rack for hall of justice, new bench for storeroom," one (1) 
new hose box for 8t k , and all the wood work for the other shops and depart- 
MENTS under Central Shops. 



PAINT SHOP: 



Staffed by three (3) painters and one (1) Body and 



Fen der man . 

Repair and paint all damage done by accidents and related damage - 
several pieces of apparatus scorched at fires, paint hose bumpers, stencil 
covers, scrape oil and varnish ladders, paint all brackets, fittings, 
gleason saddles, chock blocks and various work from sub-shops. 



■ 




Fire Dept. aerial truck outf.tteo with tractor and tiller protectee 

COVERS . 

The Central Shops were issued a supplemental work order to 

INSTALL PERSONNEL PROTECTIVE COVERS ON FIVE (5)f"»E APPARATUS, 

Through improveo application sixteen (16) fire apparatus will 
be protected with the amount appropriated. 




Thousands of feet of fire hose ape processed thru the Central Shops 

EACH YEAR FOR INSPECTION, RECORDING AND D.STR.BUTIMG TO THE VARIOU. 
FIRE STATIONS THROUGH OUT THE CITY. 



FIRE APPARATUS SHOP (cont' d) 

BLACK SM ITH SHOP : 1 Blacksmith and 2 Metalsmiths made and/or repaired 
all heavy metal fittings, brackets , holders , required on fire apparatus, 
repaired frames, reinforced panels and bodies on fire apparatus. replaced 
handles on tools, made tools, welded and repaired broken parts for various 
shops, made repairs in, and for, other departments, made k tiller cabs 
and installed, modified ambulance beds, made and installed screens in 
Police vehicles, made and installed protective equipment for Police Patrols 
and many other related jobs. 

UPHOLSTERY AND LEATHER SHOP : 1 Upholsterer; reupholsters and repairs 

AUTOMOTIVE SEATS, LAZY BACKS, OFFICE FURNITURE, MAKES SHOWER CURTAINS, RE- 
PAIRS SALVAGE COVERS, MAKES COVERS FOR FIRE APPARATUS, SPECIAL GASKETS, 
BELTS, STRAPS, SAFETY BELTS, POUCHES, SPIKE TIPS AND ALL WORK RELATED TO 
HIS CLASS FOR THE VARIOUS SUB-SHOPS. 




Shop upholsterer renovates auto seat for reinstallation in 
city vehicle. 



TRUCK SHOP : 

This shop is responsible for the major maintenance and repair of a 
wide variety of trucks ano complex motorized equipment operated by the mahy 
City departments and bureaus. The Shop is staffed with 1<J Automotive 
Machinists, 2 Automotive Servicemen, 1 Blacksmith, 1 Body and Fender Man 
and supervised by 1 Automotive Machinist Foreman, Mr. Anthony Del Negro. 

The duties of the Truck Shop is to repair, service and perform Prev- 
entive Maintenance on all heavy trucks, heavy equipment ans special equip- 

MEN T. 

a listing of work performed by the truck shop includes! 

32 Engine overhauls 
1 60 Brake overhauls 
215 Tune-ups 

11 Pumps overhauled 

21 Transmissions overhauled 

70 Accident repairs 

k7 Radiator repairs 
127 Blacksmith jobs 
985 Miscellaneous 



1668 Total jobs written 

In the electrical section of this shop we have 1 Automotive Machinist. 
The listing of work performed in this section includes: 

108 STARTERS REBUILT ANd/oR REPAIRED 

60 Generators 

86 Alternators 

57 Regulators 

68 Carburetors were overhauled 

In adoition, this Machinist does rewiring as required and collaborates 
with other machinists on hard to solve ignition and electrical problems. 



19a AVENUE SERVICE STATION ; 1 automotive Serviceman. At this station 
52,673 gallons of gasolene were dispensed, 1,796 QUARTS of oil were dis- 
pensed and 105 vehicles were inspected and serviced. 




TIRE SHOP : Staffed by 2 Automotive Servicemen. This shop services 
all City department's needs with regard to tires. The listing of work per- 
formed in this shop includes: 

87^ new tires mounted 
755 recaps mounted 
1127 t ires repa | red 

2k7 road calls for servicing 
3003 Total jobs performed 



AUTOMOBILE SHOP : 

The Automobile Shop is staffed with seven 'utomotive Mechanics, two 
Automotive Servicemen and one Automotive Mechanic foreman, Mr. Edward Franke, 

This shop is responsible for the repair and maintenance of City owned 
passenger type motor vehicles. This year 50 vehicles^-from the San Francisco 
Port Commission have been added, bringing the total to passenger cars. 

A total of 2,8l6 jobs were completed by this Shop in 1968-69. 

A major project completed was the special outfitting of 121 new Police, 
Fire, Sheriff and other Department vehicles. 

A partial listing of Shop jobs includes 2k completely rebuilt engines, 
^39 brake jobs which include the safety inspection and replacing of drums; 
wheel cylinders and hydraulic lines. 

59 Automatic transmissions were removed and totally rebuilt, and 
712 automatic transmissions were repaired and serviced in the vehicle. 
h-5 standard transmissions and clutch replacements were completed. 

City vehicles involved in accidents requiring body damage repairs 
total *+39« 8 of these were damaged beyond repair. 

Other incidental services rendered by the Shop were the towing of 
disabled vehicles and road service calls which total 162, during the year 
ending June 30, 1969. 




muto Shop outfitting new police cars for service* 

CvEH 180 VARIOUS VEHICLES WERE RECEIVED AT THE ShOPS DURING 

The past year. Each is checked for compliance with specifications 
and mechanical condition, then equipped according to the needs 
of the using department before being put into service. 




Heavy duty D . F . W . truck undergoing routine s e p v i c e and inspection. 

I'AJOR BREAKDOWNS AND "OUT OF SERVICE" TIME IS MINIMIZED WITH 

Preventive Maintenance and Inspection program on D . P . W . vehicle; 



MACHINE SHOP 

During the fiscal year 1968-69 a total of 735 jobs of individual 

DESCRIPTIONS WERE PROCESSEO IN THIS SEGMENT OF CENTRAL &HOPS. The COM- 
PLEMENT of the Machine Shop comprises 9 Maintenance Machinists and one 
Maintenance Machinist Foreman, Mr. John J. Raos. 

The function of the Machine Shop is to repair, reconstruct and main- 
tain ALL MACHINERY, TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT IN ALL C I TY DEPARTMENTS INCLUDING 

the Board of Education. 

The Fire Department High-Pressure Water system requires the services 
of the Machine Shop in keeping in repair the machinery in the two high- 
pressure WATER PUMPING PLANTS AS WELL AS THE MAKING AND THE REPAIRING OF 

parts for the f|re hydrants throughout the clty. 

The Machine Shop section of Central Shops services all the tools and 
machinery of the industrial arts section of the secondary schools and 
High Schols throughout the City. Also the heating system machinery, fans 
and blowers of all these schools. 

The SEWAGE PUMPING PLANTS, OF WHICH THERE are 12, CONSIST of 

pumping machinery, hydraulic valves, and circulating pumps which are kept 
in repair by the machine shop section of central s h ops. 

The sewer treatment plants, South-East, North Point and Richmond- 
Sunset, ARE SERVICED BY k MAINTENANCE MACHINISTS UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF 

the Machine Shop Foreman. 

The men assigned to these plants service and rebuild tarts for pump- 
ing machinery, blowers, filter driers and other related equipment. 

The Park and Recreation Department requires the services of the 
Machine Shop in keeping in repair the pumping and sewer treatment equip- 
ment in the Golden Gate Park reclamation plant; the irrigation pumps at 
the south windmill; the Merr y-Go-Round at the children's playground; and 
the sewage pumps located throughout the zoo compound. 

The Hose Shop, which is a sub-section of the Machine Shop, is re- 
quired TO INSPECT, REPAIR ANO DISTRIBUTE ALL THE HOSE USED IN THE FlRE 

Department. 



The year 1968-69i 24,000 feet of new hose was received, labeled, and 
distributed to the various companies of the flre department. 30,000 feet 
of in-service f|re hose was repaired and tested by the sub-section of the 
Mach ine Shop . 



RECREATION AND PARK AUTOMO T IVE SHCP 

Golden Gate Park Automotive Shop is situated within the rolling mead- 
ow of South Drive just off Third avenue. Its work force, stabilized in 
number for the past 25 years, consists of three automotive machinists and 
one Automotive Serviceman supervised by Automotive Machinist Foreman, Mr. 
James Elliot. A temporary Automotive Machinist has been employed to fill 
in for vacations and leave. This extra man has, however, not proved 
sufficient toward stemming the tide of the increased work load arising 
from the expansion of the Park's motor fleet. 

The complement of 158 equipment units in 1952 has expanded to a pre- 
sent DAY COUNT OF 390. 

During 1968-69, 1,^95 individual jobs were turned out including 
such major work projects as, complete overhaul of two large chauffeur- 
operated mowers; total overhaul of the big Wayne Sweepers as well as the 
motor crew transport truck and trailer. 

The preventive maintenance program has been necessarily curtailed due 
to lack of personnel. This curtailment is unhappily reflected by the 
large number of equipment pieces which are constantly in for repairs; 

FROM 80 TO 100 ON AN AVERAGE. The INCREASED VOLUME OF EQUIPMENT OUT OF 

service presents vexing problems and difficulties for the department of 
Recreation and Parks. 

The Park Shop fuel station was busy dispensing an annual total of 
106,175 gallons of gasoline and 6,950 quarts of oil. 

This gas and oil service was not confined to Park vehicles but in- 
cluded MOTOR CARS FROM MANY OTHER ClTY DEPARTMENTS. 



HALL OF JUSTICE SERVICE ST mTION 

This branch of the Central Shops is located on Bryant Street, west 
of the Hall of Justice. It provides fuel and service to Police Depart- 
ment VEHICLES AND SUPPLIES GASOLINE AND OIL TO OTHER ClTY VEHICLES. THE 

Station is operated 7 days a week from 7 A.M. to midnight and is staffed 
with 8 Automotive Servicemen, 1 Automotive Serviceman Sub-Foreman, Mr. 
Robert Desmond, 2 Automotive Mechanics and one Automotive Mechanic Sub- 
Foreman, Mr. Howard Gettle. 

The convenient down-town location and the accelerated useage of Police 
vehicles continue this station as a high volume distribution point of fuel 
and lubricants for clty vehicles. 

The past year shows the following services performed: 



Gasoline d i spensed 

Oil d i spensed 

Tow jobs 

Tires changed (new and recaps) 

Batteries serviced (new or charge) 

Lube and service jobs 

Mechanical repa i rs 



539,313 
18,225 
1,552 
2,591 
708 
2,316 
6,125 



Motorcycle service 

Lubed 

Tires changed 
Batter i es 
Repa i rs 



^71 
115 
110 
166 



ARMY STREET STa TI ON - DPW 

This station completed 2,006 jobs during the 1968-69 fiscal year. 
These jobs consisted of minor repairs, tune ups, sewer lamps, chain saws, 
light plants, air hoses, truck and car repairs, compressors , "and minor.. 
brake adjustments. 




SAN FRANCISCO P O RT COMMISSION 

April 1969 saw the Port of San Francisco transferred from State 
Control to that of the City and County of San Francisco. 

A total of 53 various units of Automotive equipment were included in th 
this transfer of authority. 

This equipment .is serviced and maintained by two (2) automotive 
Mechanics (_n Port payrolls) and by the Central Shops. The Central Shops 
provide automotive material and supplies, contractual services and major 
repairs beyond the capabilities of the Port shop facilities. Funding is 
through work order contribution. 



CONCLUSION 

The Central Shops again completed a fiscal year with an increase 
in productivity* a total of 7 t ^08 major jobs were complete, 5% more than 
the previous year, yet, even with this all out effort, we are hard pressed 
to keep up with the needs and demands of the various departments. as their 
fleet grows in size and complexity, and the demand for services of the 
various departments continues to spiral, so, too, does the repair require- 
ments of their automotive equipment. 

The Shop is staffed with a total of 101 employees, the same 
number as we had 17 years ago? while the number of units in the fleet 
has grown to 2121 , an increase of over 50/6. 

The Shop budget is predicated on A) Shop costs - i.e. materials 

AND SUPPLIES, CONTRACTUAL SERVICES, LABOR AND OVERHEAD} B) SIZE AN USE 

of Departmental automotive fleets; and C) anticipated replacement of used 
veh i cles. 

Budgetary action in reducing "Maintenance ano Repairs of auto- 
motive EQUIPMENT" TO THE AMOUNT BUDGETED IN THE PREVIOUS YEAR, PLACES AN 
EXTRAORDINARY BURDEN ON CENTRAL ShCPS WHEN COSTS OF SUPPLIES AND LABOR 

continue to increase, when the using departments do not ( or cannot) reduce 
the use of their vehicles to an amount relative to that available for 
maintenance and repair, and when funds for recommended replacement vehicles 
are disapproved. 

a reasonable and economically conservative vehicle replacement 
program has been developed for clty vehicles. however, the situation 
continues of retaining vehicles that are old, worn out and undependable 
while, at the same time, the shops are expected to keep them in top 
operational condition with limited funds and minimal manpower. such a 
system is wasteful because of the cost of repairs to the obsolete vehicles 
and the excessive down-time involving the equipment and its operation. 

The fiscal policy of funding the shops through budget allocations 
ano work orders is archaic and unrealistic the m00ern operational concept 
is that of a "motor transport division*' whereby clty-owned vehicles are 
leased to the operating departments for a rental fee that includes maint- 
enance, repairs ano depreciation. 



JULY 1, 1969 



CENTRAL SHOPS ORGANIZATIONAL CHART 
800 QUINT STREET 

*1 - 7150 General Superintendent of Shops 

1 - 7277 Ass't. Superintendent of Shops 

*1 - 16h-h- Senior Management Assistant 

1 - 1632 Senior Account Clerk 

1 - 1630 Account Clerk 

1 - 1h-2h- Clerk-Typist 

TRUCK SHOP PASSENGER SHOP 

- 725^ Foreman 1 - 72h-9 Foreman 

- 7313 Auto Machinist 7 - 7381 Auto Mechanic 

- 7313 Auto Machinist (DPW YARD) 1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman 

- 7^10 Auto Serviceman - Truck *1 - 7h-10 Auto Serviceman 

- 7^10 Auto Serviceman *1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman (Health 

- 7^10 Auto Serviceman - Station Garage) 

TIRE SHOP FIELD SERVICE 

2 - 7*+10 Auto Serviceman 1 - 7313 Auto Machinist 

BODY SHOP F IRE SHOP 

3 - 7306 Body u Fender Man 1 - 725^ Foreman 

1 - 7315 Sub-Foreman 
BLACKSMITH SHOP 7 - 7313 Auto Machinist 

2 - 7389 Metalsm i th 



2 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman 

2 - 7358 Pattern Maker 

2 - 7305 Blacksmith U-/q<-, ,, 

1 - 7387 Upholsterer 



MACHINE SHOP 



3 - 7309 Pa inter 
(1) - 7309 Painter (XF) 



1 - 7237 Maint. Machinist Foreman 

3 - 73^3 Maint. Machinist HaLL OF JUSTICE 



** - 73^+3 Maint. Machinist (Sewage Plant) 

2 - 73^3 Maint. Machinist (Schools) 

WmTCHMAN 

3 - 7^+10 Auto Serviceman 

FIRE HOUSE DELI VERY 



'1 - 7382 Sub-Foreman 
2 - 7381 Auto Mechanic 
'1 - 7^12 Sub-Foreman 
'8 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman 

park shop 

1 - 725^ Foreman 



1-01 Chauffeur 3 - 7313 Auto Machinist 

* ni *^ , c- *rvK a *1 - 7^+10 Auto Serviceman 

1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman - 19'=* Avenue 

*1 - 7^+10 Auto Serviceman - D of E Yars *1 - 1936 General Storekeeper 



DPW YARD (SERVICE STATION) 



1 - 193^ Storekeeper 



1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman (day) * 21 Budgeted 

2 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman (Night Gas) 79 WO (Work 

1 - 74-10 Auto Serviceman (Night PM) 0r;er) 

1 - 7315 Auto Machinist - Sub-Foreman (Nigh PM) 1 XF (Extra 

Fund) 

101 



DEPT 
NO. 



Number of City-owned vehicles sy Department 
Per IBM Inventory run as of June 30, 1969 



DEPARTMENT 



NO. OF DEPT 
VEHICLES NO. 



DEPARTMENT 



NO. OF 
VEHICLES 



111 hdult Probation 

115 Assessor 

117 City Attorney 

119 C I ty Planning 

123 Controller 

131 S.F. Disaster Corps. 

141 District attorney 

145 Fire Department 

151 The Mayor 

161 Police Department 

165 Publ i c Defender 

169 Social Services 

1 70 Single M en's Rehab. 
173 Sheriff 

181 Bo. of Supervisors 

185 Probation Officer 

187 Log Cabin Ranch 

188 Hidden Valley School 
213 Calif. Acaoemy; Sciences 
221 Chief Admin. Officer 
223 Coroner 

233 Dept. of Electricity 

243 Public Administrator 

245 Real Estate Dept. 

255 Registrar of Voters 

261 Tax Collector-Gen. Off. 

265 Weights-Measures 

311 Purch.-Gen Office 

312 Purch . - Shops 

DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS 

413 Architecture 

415 Bldg. Inspection 

415.1 Federal aid 
417 Bldg. Repair 

417.2 TRAFF I C.Pa INT ING 

421 Eng ineer ing 

423 General Office 

424 Personnel Admin. 

425 Sewage Pumping Sta. 
427 Sewage Treat. Plants 
429 Sewer Repair Div. 
431 Street Cln. Autos 



7 
2 
2 
2 
1 
5 
4 
272 
5 
281 
3 

41 
2 

37 
3 

17 
5 
2 
6 
1 
5 

35 
3 
1 
1 
4 

10 
4 

39 



9 

43 

5 

97 

29 

25 

2 

3 

2 

24 

118 

104 



DEPT. OF PUBLIC HEAL TH 

513 Administration 5 

525 Plague Surveillance 1 

527 Dairy & Milk Inspect. 14 

531 Food & Sanitary Inspect. 15 

535 Health Centers 5 

539 Public Health Nursing 1 

551 Emergency Hospitals 16 

553 Hassler Hospital 9 

555 Laguna Honda Hosp. 9 

557 S.F. Gen' l. Hosp ital 9 

561 Mental Admin. 2 

567 Mental Inst. Service 1 



661 Legion of Honor 

621 DeYoung Museum 

631 Library 

651 Rec. & Park General 

651S Rec. & Park Services 

661A City College 

661B John O'Connell 

661E Shop Trucks 

661F Gardners Autos, Etc. 

661G Delivery Trucks 

661H Administration 



1 

1 

6 

137 

267 

2 

1 

9 

16 

13 

4 



DEPT. OF P UBLIC WORKS (ROAD FUND) 

681 Street Repa i r 

683 Traffic Engineering 

686 Street Tree Planting 

TOTAL 
Police Motorcycles 
GRAND TOTAL 



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OOLLAR DISTRIBUTION 
OF 

SHOPS EXPENDITURES 

1968-69 



"x 



PERSONAL SERVICES 
J867.168.00 
(70X) 




CONTRACTUAL 

SERVICES 

$15^,839.00 

(12%) 



A F P E N D I X 



TABLE NO. I 







PURCHASE ORDERS PROCESSED 








1968-1969 


1 967- 


-1968 






Purchase 




■ Purchase 








Orders 


Amount 


Prders 




hmount 


General 


15,029 


$ 7,136,303 


15,334 




$ 7,183,008 


Education 


7,467 


4,462,828 


9,900 




4,785,608 


Health 


6,102 


3,513,859 


6,369 




3,747,103 


lit 1IJ ties 


6,510 


4, 22a, 442 


5,836 




3,286,014 


TOTALS 


35,106 


$19,341,432 


37,439 


$19,001,733 



Purchases by 

Encumbrance 

Requests $38,769,403 $22,398,^20 

T0TAL $58,110,835 $41,400,153 



TABLE WO. 2 

EXPENDITURES 

Comparison of expenditures with original budget for all operating appro- 
priations except Personal Services for 1968-1969. 

Account 

Contractual Services 
3.31 I .200.000 

Materials & Suppl ies 
6.311 .300.000 

Equipment 
8.311 .400.000 

Premium-Official Bonds 
8. 315. 812. 31 I 



b. 315. 013.31 I 

Membership Dues 38,790 30,06i 8,729 

8 . 3 1 I . 800 .000 

TOTALS i 135,140 $ 140,208 $ 11,113 $ 16,181 
REVENUE 





Encumbered 






Budgeted 


& 


Expended 


Surp 1 us 


Deficit 


$ 13,417 


$ 


22,346 




$ 6,92< 


16,575 




15,526 


$ 1,049 




25,167 




24,929 


238 




6,191 




5,094 


1,097 




35,000 




42,252 




7.25; 



Comparison of Revenues with Estimated Revenues - 1968-69: 



Account 


Estimated 
Revenue 


Actual 
Revenue 


Over 
Estimated 


Under 
Estimated 


Sale of Documents 
7061 


$ 1 , 200 


$ 1,423 




i 223 


Mi nor Sa 1 es 
7062 


3,000 


4,953 


- 


1,953 


Sales of Grease 
7621 


600 
G 


456 


$ 144 





TOTALS $ 4,800 $ 6,832 $ 144 $2,176 



SHOP EX PE NDITURES 
COMPARISON OF 1968-69 DIRECT CHARGES WITH PRIOR YEAR 1967-* 



1. PERSONNEL SERVICES 



Administrative salaries 

Wages 

Ret i REMEN T 

Work Orders 



19 68-69 

$15,120.00 

714,548.00 

11,418.00 

126,082.00 

$ 867,168.00 



1967-68 

$ 12,780.00 

680,801.00 

8,132.00 

108 ,105 .00 

„809, 818.00 



2 . C ONTRACTU AL SERVICES 

Original appropriation 
By transfer 

Less unexpended 
TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

5 . MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES 

Original appropriation 
By transfer 

Less unexpended 



$121,170.00 

56,985.00 

$158,153.00 

3,314. 00 



$202,506.00 



300.00 



$ 227,243.00 



$105,694.00 

52,144.00 

$157,838.00 

8,088.00 



$ 154,839. 00 I 149,750.00 



$ 194,961.00 



25,037.00 10,000.00 
$227,543.00 $ 204,961.00 



315. 00 

$ 204,646.00 



TOTAL SERVICES 



i1, 249, 250. 00 $1,164,214.00 



DOCUMENTS 

SEP Z i 1970 

jWW FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



_- PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Fiscal Year 1969-70 



September, 1970 



ANNUAL REPORT 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and 
contractual services for all departments for the City and County, including 
city-owned utilities, the San Francisco Port Commission and the San Francisco 
Unified School District; repairs and maintains automotive and other equipment 
for the various departments, except Public Utilities, and for the School 
District as requested; operates a central reproduction bureau for departments 
requiring its services; transfers to other departments for use or sells equip- 
ment and supplies no longer useful to any department of the city; maintains a 
perpetual inventory of equipment in the various departments; and operates 
central- stores of the Purchasing and various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by the 
Shops on equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of Buying on 
new products, specifications and prices. 

PERSONNEL 

Employments totaled 197 permanent in four bureaus. The Organization 
Chart is shown in the Appendix. 

SUPERVISORY - June 30, 1970 

Administrative 

T. F. Conway - Purchaser of Supplies 

D. J. Hewartson - Secretary 

Bureaus 

Buying 

J. C. Gavin - Assistant Director of Purchasing & Services - Bureau Head 

G. A. Clarke - Senior Purchaser 

C. J. Morrissey - Coding Supervisor (Acting) 

Equipment and Supplies 

J. H. Beck - Stores and Equipment Supervisor - Bureau Head 
J. A. Frantz - Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

Personnal and Accounts 

George Harley - Chief Clerk - Bureau Head 
R. A. Davis - Principal Clerk 

Reproduction 

Edward Fundi s - Reproduction Manager - Bureau Head 

Shops 

A. M. Flaherty - General Superintendent of City Shops - Bureau Head 

E. R. Rames - Assistant Superintendent of City Shops 

- 1 - 



Bureaus - Continued 



SEPARATIONS; Retirements. Deaths 



The valued services of the following were separated from City employment 
through retirement or death after years of meritorious accomplishment. 



Name 

Merdlch, Michael 
Clrlno, Elsie M. 
Keller, Elizabeth A 
Doyle, Alfred H. 
Ryan, Thomas J. 
Mecaskey, Eugene 
Flnnerty, Lois W. 
Thompson, Florence 
Mehegan, Patrick C. 
Johnson, Mervyn R. 
Mlfsud, Josephine 

Died 



Proctor, Glen E. 
Barry, Joseph T. 



Position 


City Service 


Date 


Sr. Account Clerk 


24 


8- 1-69 


Gen. Clerk-Typist 


II 


1 1 - 1-69 


Sr. Account Clerk 


20 


12- 1-69 


Automotive Serviceman 


28 


12- 1-69 


Blueprint & Repro. Mgr. 


25 


1- 1-70 


Blacksmith 


18 


2-11-70 


Gen. Clerk-Typist 


23 


3- 1-70 


Sr. Clerk-Typist 


24 


4- 1-70 


Automotive Serviceman 


18 


6- 1-70 


Purchaser 


27 


6-12-70 


Reproduction Foreman 


25 


6- 1-70 


Automotive Serviceman 


14 


9-23-69 


Senior Storekeeper 


25 


3- 3-70 



WORK ACCOMPLISHED 



The work accomplished In the fiscal year Is described In more detail 
under the separate bureaus. 

Recapitulation Is as follows: 

Bureau Unit 

Buying Purchase Orders 
Amount 

Encumbrance Requests 
Amount 

Stores 4 Surplus Sales - Amount 
Equipment Major Stores Operated 



Shops 



Job Orders 
Expenditures 



1968-1969 


1969-1970 


35,108 
$19,341,432 


34,148 
$19,856,923 


$38,769,403 


39,662,853 


$62,093.19 
II 


$104,988.1 1 
II 


7,408 
$ 1,249,250 


7,524 
1, 425,541 



Reproduction Services rendered 
Amount 



162,875 



175,487 



- 2 - 



GENERAL COMMENTS 

The period covered by this report, while not marked by material 
changes in facilities, procedures and methods, saw steady progress being 
made. 

The specification and control section, initiated to make studies 
which cannot be done by present staff without curtailing and delaying 
service to other departments, continued on an intermittent basis because 
of lack of personnel. The need for expanding this function to full time 
Is considered obvious in view of continuing technological advances in 
processes, equipment, materials and supplies. 

Activities of the Central Shops, Reproduction Bureau and the Bureau 
of Stores and Equipment are described and commented on elsewhere in this 
report. The filling of key positions with permanent personnel during 
the period of this report can be expected to be advantageous. 



- 3 - 



BUREAU OF BUYING 

This Bureau, procures materials and supplies, equipment and insurance 
and contracts for services, for all city departments and the San Francisco 
Unified School District. Except for term contracts based on estimated 
quantities, all buying starts with receipt of requisition from using depart- 
ment. Included in or incidental to the procurement function are the follow- 
ing: (outlined in detail in a previous report) 

I . Buying - Bids and Awards 

Preparation of bids, including contractual - and technical require- 
ments; evaluation of bids; and award of bids. 

I I . Buying - Related Functions 

Analysis of records of average use; maintenance of specification 
file; new term contracts; and review of procedures. 

PERSONNEL 

The buying division is headed by the Assistant Director of Purchasing 
and Services and includes II assistant purchasers. The clerical staff, under 
the Bureau of Personnel and Accounts, is engaged in typing, mailing, opening 
and tabulating bids, maintaining bid index and specifications file, and 
typing contracts. Funds for some of these employments, both buying and cler- 
ical, are provided by other departments. 

Detailed employments ace as follows: 

I Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 

1 Senior Purchaser 
7 Purchasers 

2 Purchasers (Printing) 
I Assistant Purchaser 

OPERATIONS 

Purchasing work is assigned on a commodity basis with allowance for 
items of a special nature or in cases where seasonal peaks or vacation period 
make it advisable to temporarily deviate from this policy. 

Periodic meetings of the buying staff permit the exchange of ideas, ex- 
planation of improved procedures and generally keep the assistant purchasers 
informed as to the overall progress and problems. 

Every effort is made to process requisitions as rapidly as possible but 
delays occur due to lack of personnel, inadequate information furnished with 
requisitions, and failure of departments to submit requisitions promptly for 
equipment items that are to be grouped for purchase for purposes of standard- 
ization and economy. 



- 4 - 



BUREAU OF BUYING - Continued 

OPERATIONS - Continued 

In preparing requisitions, departments are requested to furnish informa- 
tion that will indicate a standard of overall quality and usefulness suitable 
for actual use requirements and permit competition as required by the Charter 
and Administrative Code. A new form was devised for this purpose making it 
easier for departments to furnish desirable information for bid purposes. 

As time is available personnel are assigned to: 

1. Review specifications, forms and procedures. 

2. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing 
additional term contracts for articles and services where 
desirable. 

The need for a separate section to expand the above services is apparent 
if the department is to most efficiently and effectively perform its purchas- 
ing functions. This work is now being done on an intermittent basis as time 
is available. Every effort should be made to procure a full-time employment 
for this work. 

Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into for various service 
and commodities in general use by several departments or recurring use by a 
department. The main advantages are elimination of the time laq resulting 
when individual bids are requested and elimination of the cost involved in 
individual bids. 

New term contracts initiated during the year include: 

1. Debris box Service. 

2. Uniform Service - San Francisco Airport. 

3. Disposing of filter cake - Sewage Treatment Plant. 

In addition to these new term contracts, old contracts are constantly 
being revised, specifications up-dated, no longer required items deleted 
and new items added. 

Major purchases include the following: 

Modern stage lighting equipment for the Opera House. 

Stadium chairs - Candlestick Park 

Radio Communication equipment for Police and Municipal Railway 

Trees and plants for Market and Mission streets. 



5 - 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL 4 ACCOUNTS 



George Harley - Chief Clerk 
Robert Davis - Principal Clerk 



Travel i ng 
Requisitions: 



Purchase 
Orders: 



Tabu lation of 
bids: 

Requisition 
Reg i ster : 



Monthly Repetitive Purchase Orders are processed in 
quantity on a repeat basis. These are large numbers 
of requisitions as used by Public Health, Public 
Utilities, Public Works, Purchasing, Recreation 
and Park, Schools, Sheriff, Library and Controller. 

New purchase forms and increased use of photographic 
processes in preparing bids and purchase orders have 
significantly speeded up the issuance of purchase 
orders. Additionally, the time saved has permitted 
a substantial reduction in the backlog of unpaid 
invoices. 

Microfilming of bids on Contract Proposals and 
Quotation continued. 

Cumulative weekly and monthly, as well as daily, runs 
of this register have been continued. It is indis- 
pensable in locating requisitions processed for 
Purchase Order. 



Vendor Index: 

Codes on Purchase 
Orders: 

Bid Index: 



Continued . 

Use of vendor Location Code, Buyer Code, and Com- 
modity Code continued. 

Conti nued . 



The number of purchase orders to be prepared is not constant chiefly 
due to the fact that requisitions do not flow into the department in a 
uniform manner. Consequently, there are times when a high production may 
be desired when personnel is depleted by variations (which cannot be 
spread over the normal vacation period due to conditions beyond our con- 
trol) sickness, or otherwise. Our very limited temporary funds must be 
used in even more critical areas and at more critical times. It is hoped 
that sufficient funds for the temporary employments will be provided in 
the future. 

Sales of Charters, Codes and other documents amounted to $19,374. 

Discounts earned amounted to $66,198.42 or 99.8%. 



6 - 



CODING DIVISION 



The Coding Division, under the Bureau of Buying, 
continues the development of the material and supplies 
coding system. The system Is now used by all requistlon- 
lng departments. 

The Group 75 code catalog, covering Stationery, Office 
Supplies and Office Devices, has been up-dated and re- 
printed. The new improved material index giving the arroup 
and class numbers of many items has been printed. All 
involved departments have been issued both printings. The 
use of the new index will simplify the locating of Item 
code numbers. 

The Water Department and the Railway completed the 
combining of their inventory control systems. The use of 
our coding system, simplified the merger. Many new code 
numbers have been developed this past year for the new 
equipment purchased by the Railway. 

Thousands of new codes are beins: developed and 
assigned to the San Francisco Port Commission. The Port 
will control their inventory , through a data processing 
system, based on the system used by Railway and the Water 
Departments. The Coding Division is cooperating in this 
effort. 

The division continues the maintenance of the School 
Departments Friden item identification stock cards. 

At our request, departments continue to send personnel 
for Instruction in coding procedures. We favor this action 
and have plans for future method of instruction. 



7 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT 



The Bureau of Stores and Equipment operates and maintains a 
central warehouse and storerooms in various City Departments; receives 
and issues materials, supplies and equipment for all departments of 
the City and County of San Francisco; end makes miscellaneous emergency 
purchases for the account of the various agencies. This Bureau 
arranges for the sale of and sells surplus and obsolete personal property 
belonging to the City; exchanges equipment between departments, maintains 
a perpetual inventory of all materials purchased for the City and County 
of San Francisco, and makes periodic checks of such property e The 
Bureau maintains control of the entire automotive fleet, including the 
listing, insurance and the reporting of all accidents. 

The following locations are staffed and operated by the Bureau 
of Stores and Equipment: 



Name and Location 



Central Warehouse - 15th & Harrison Sts. 



Tyjge 



Amount o f Inventory.. 



Stationery 
Janicrial Supplies 
1+000 Cases Foodstuffs 
Misco Furniture 
Pipe, etco 



Dept, Public Works 
Water Department 
Hetch Hetchy 
S.F, Intl, Airport 
Municipal Railway 



Health Dept, 



Social Services 

Recreation & Park 

Dept, Electricity 

Sheriff 

Central Shop Store 



- 2323 Army St. 

- 1990 Newcomb Ave, 

- Moccasin, Calif, 
~ So, San Francisco 

• 2*+th & Utah Sts., and 
2 sub-stores 
General Stores) 
Washington & Mason) 

- Elkton Yard (Bond Fund) 

- Potrero and one sub-store, 
~ S. F. General Hospital, 

22ird & Potrero 

- Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th & Dewey 

- Hassler Hospital, Redwood City 

- Single Men : s Rehabilitation Center, 
Redwood City 

- Golden Gate Park 

- 901 Rankin St c 

- Hall of Justice Garage (Sub-Store) 



7,259o95 
*+,975=60 
* 

■k 
* 

lt+0, 926*77 

559 ; 299,55 

i+6,079.21 

30 B 37k o kJ 

237,512.31 



319,811,88 
25,62*+,, 10 
99,*»59o0*» 

1/0, 15*. 83 

292,357.92 

5h, 117.02 

1,617.75 

29,529.16 
66,209.33 
67,855.75 
72,806,37 



* Storage only - Amount included with departmental inventory. 



- 8 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



PERSONNEL 

The Sales, Inventory and Stores Division is staffed by the 
fol lowing: 

1 Stores and Equipment Supervisor 

1 Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

1 Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

1 Senior Clerk-Typist 

2 Inventory Clerks 

11 Senior Storekeepers 

21 Storekeepers (plus 1 Storekeeper on work order) 
8 Assistant Storekeepers 
1 Laborer 
TOTAL kj 



SALES DIVISION 

Twenty four sales were conducted during the fiscal year under 
the authority of Section 88 of the Charter. Sales activities in- 
cluded legal research into various aspects of different sales- 
preparation of sales, inviting interested buyers to bid, opening and 
awarding of bids, collecting and depositing all money received from 
buyers with the City Treasurer and keeping records of correspondence 
relative to the sales. 

The total revenue from the sales of 1969-70 was: $104,988.11. 
A general breakdown of the sales is as follows: 

Scrap Metal $ 2,586.53 
Miscellaneous Metal (Mocassin) 14, 1^0,99 

Data Processing Equipment 357.00 
Moccasin Powerhouse Equipment 59*889»00 

White Motor Coaches 1,687.75 

X-Ray Film 5,279o55 

Gas Tanks 3,000.00 

Autos - Trucks 10,501.90 

Grease Bones 759.62 

Sacks - Containers 283.58 

Waste Paper - IBM Cards 1,923.44 

C.I. Pipe - Fittings 4, 220. 85 

Miscellaneous 357.90 



9 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AMD EQUIPMENT - Continued 



INVENTORY DIVISION 

This division has the assignment of maintaining the equipment 
inventory of all City Departments; the investigation and reporting to 
the Board of Supervisors on lost, damaged, or stolen items of equip- 
ment; also the transfer of surplus or rehabilitated equipment* 
During the fiscal year, many of the City Departments were surveyed, e 
complete physical check of equipment and the Perpetual Inventory 
records updated. 

Directing the accumulation of waste materials, such as scrap metal, 
waste paper, Tab (I,B.M ) Cards, X-Ray film, and other miscellaneous 
saleable items were gathered, and disposed of by sa1e„ 

Meetings and conferring with various City Department heads and 
Moving Contractors, to co-ordinate, set up procedure and secure 
estimates; to negotiate moves are a function of this Division, During 
the fiscal year, we entered into and negotiated over 70 moves «- 
DcP.W, Property Conservation, Hetch Hetchy Utilities Engineers, Public 
Library Business Branch, Social Services Department, DoP H e Venereal 
Disease Clinic, and Muni Railway Engineers, were among the many moves 
dealt with. 

The transfer and rehabilitation of office furniture and equipment 
between City Departments results in saving of approximately $25,000, 
book value. 



- 10 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT ~ Continued 



STORES DIVISION 

Personnel changes in the past year involved the addition of four 
limited tenure 1932 Assistant Storekeepers selected by Civil Service, 
who proved to be very capable and efficient employees. The addition 
of the above four limited tenure 1932 Assistant Storekeepers thus 
advanced four of our permanent 1932 Assistant Storekeepers to limited 
tenure 193^ Storekeeper positions,, 

Other changes took place when two of our permanent 193*+ Store- 
keepers were assigned to limited tenure appointments as 1936 Senior 
Storekeepers, 

In addition, from the Civil Service promotive list, one of our 
193*+ Storekeepers was called for a permanent assignment as a 1936 Senior 
Storekeeper e 

Civil Service tests have been held for all three storekeeping 
classes and we are awaiting the results which will effect the above posi- 
tions mentioned and involve permanent re-assignments of the successful 
candidates. 

The storekeeping group was saddened by the passing away of 
Joe Barry, a 1936 Senior Storekeeper who was so well liked by his many 
co-workers, and friends. 

All storekeeping locations received the new revised code catelog 
and improved booklet that is a great help in speeding up the ordering 
process. 

Two new storeroom facilities are in the offing as work progresses 
on the new San Francisco General Hospital and plans are being made for an 
enlarged storeroom for the expanding San Francisco International Airport, 

Three representatives from Los Angeles County, Alameda County and 
San Jose State College toured our storekeeping locations to obtain ideas 
and observe stores procedures for use in their warehouse facilities* 

The Stores and Equipment Supervisor and Assistant Supervisor 
attended the Governor's Safety Council meetings and relayed information 
and advice to the storekeeping personnel. 



I I - 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU 



The Reproduction Bureau provides a centralized service 
available to all City Departments for photography, offset 
printing, mimeographing, photostating, blueprinting, micro- 
filming and self-service copiers. 

Funds to operate the Bureau are provided by work orders 
from over 70 Departments that make use of the Bureau's facilities. 
Work done for City Departments during 1969-70 amounted to $175,487 
This is an increase of over $57,000. in the last five years, with 
the same number of personnel. 

This period was marked by the retirement of three of 
our most experienced employees: Tom Ryan, Reproduction 
Manager; Josephine Mifsud, Sr . Blueprint Operator 
(both after 24 years of service); and Elizabeth Keller, Sr. 
Account Clerk. These retirements created considerable pres- 
sure on their replacements and on the rest of the staff. 

Warren Wong held an interim appointment as Reproduction 
Manager during a very trying six-month period. Mrs. Gertrude 
Lee succeeded Mrs. Keller as Sr . Account Clerk and has proven 
invaluable . 



Equipment 

1 42" Blueprint machine 

1 42" Ammonia Process machine 

1 19" x 23" Process Camera 

1 14" x 17" Offset Press 

1 10" x 14" Offset Press 

2 8 1/2 " x 14" Mimeograph machines 
1 26 1/2" Power cutter 

1 Power wire stitcher 
1 Folder 

1 11" x 17" Camera-platemaker 

1 11" x 17" Automatic Offset 

Duplicating Machine 



1 18" x 24" Photostat 

machine 
1 18" x 24" electrostatic 

printer (prints from 

35 mm. film) 
1 16mm. two-sided microfilmer 
1 35mm. planetary microfilmer 
1 11" x 17" 10 station collator 



Personnel 

1 Sr. Account Clerk 

1 Reproduction Foreman 

1 Sr. Offset Machine Operator 

1 Sr . Blueprint Machine Operator 

1 Offset Machine Operator 

2 Blueprint Machine Operators 
1 Photostat Operator 

1 Photo-Lithographer 

1 Photographer (part time) 

1 Clerk 



-12- 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU (Continued) 



Major Recurring Functions of the Bureau 



All Departments 

Various Departments (20) 

City Attorney 

Board of Supervisors 

Purchasing 

Treasurer 

Recreation & Park 



Public Works Engineering, 
Bureau of Architecture, 
Recreation & Park, SFUSD 



Public Works, City Attorney 
SFUSD 



Assessor, Public Works, 
Recorder, Tax Collector 
Purchasing 



Departmental Budget Estimates 
Departmental Final Budget 

Annual Reports 

Opinions and other legal papers 

Calendars and Ordinances 

Bids, Specifications and 
Purchasing Records 

Microfilm Records of Checks 
Deposited 

Specifications for construction, 
maintenance and repair of 
buildings, parks and recre- 
ational facilities. 



Contract sets of blueprints for 
construction, maintenance 
and repair of public buildings, 
streets, sewers and recreat- 
ional facilities. 



Photography in connection with 
construction, progress, earth 
slides, accidents, redevelop- 
ment and planning 



Blueprinting of Block maps of the 
City & County of San Francisco 



In addition to the major functions listed above the Bureau 
performs many hundreds of non-recurring jobs for City Departments. 
The greater part of this work is of an urgent nature; with dead- 
lines set by ordinance; advertised dates for bids; and the normal 
requirements of departments' deadlines which must be met. 



-13- 



BUREAU OF SHOPS 

The primary responsibility of this Bureau is to provide maintenance, 
repair, and service to the automotive fleet of the clty and county of 
San Franc I sco . 

The critical need for an efficiently maintained fleet of automotive 
vehicles cannot be over-stated. without such equipment and service, few 
City Departments could operate today. 

The administration of the Shops, unoer the Furchaser of Supplies, 
is the direct responsibility of Mr. Albert M. Flaherty, City Shops 
General Superintendent, aided by Mr. Edmond A. Rames, City Shops Assist- 
ant Superintendent. 

The Central Shops, and allied facilities, provide all necessary 
mechanical maintenance and repair service for all clty departments and 
Bureaus (with the exception of Public Utilities). In addition, it is 
the responsibility of this bureau to inspect, appraise and make recommenda- 
tions on all clty owned vehicles contemplated for replacement; aid the 
various departments in the writing of specifications; provioe technical, 
engineering, and design information as related to automotive equipment; 
to receive and approve all new vehicles delivered to the clty, ano to 
outfit ano prepare these vehicles for service. 




The Central Shops includes the following maintenance shop areas: 
(1) Automobile; (2) Truck; (3) Fire Apparatus; (k) Machine; ano the 
following auxiliary shops: Blacksmith, Pattern, Paint, Hose, Upholstery, 
Body and Fender, Tire, and Service Station. In addition, the Shops assume 
responsibilities for the maintenance and repair of mechanical equipment 
in school buildings, sewage plants, pumping stations, public buildings. 
More than 2,100 motorized units of the City owned fleet are maintained. 
These vehicles are valueo at above six million dollars. 

The Bureau is staffed with 101 employees. (See Organization Chart). 

This past year saw three veteran employees of the Central Shops retire 
after many years of faithful service to the City. They are: 

Alfred Doyle, 7^10 Automotive Serviceman 
(28 years service) 

Patrick Mchcgan, 7^10 Automotive Serviceman 
(17 tears service) 

Eugene MeCaskey, 7305 Blacksmith 
(16 years serv ice) 

- 14 - 



ACCOUNTING 

1969-70 marked the beginning year during which central shops functioned 
on a total Work Crder requisition basis. 

The Bureau was selected as a pilot department to study the practic- 
ability of placing all City service departments on a Work Order funding 

PL AN . 

Thus, for the past year, the Shops have been operating without benefit 
of officially allocated appropriations. Since its budget structure was 
factually of a "memorandum" nature, the Shops accounting staff was obliged 
to impose even more stringent controls over expenditure outlays than hao 
been required under the former fiscal system of budget transfers. 

In ADDITION TO MONITORING THE FLOW OF INCOMING FUNDS AND EXPENDITURE 
CONSUMPTION, THE STAFF CARRIES ON THE I'SUAL CHORE OF BILLING USING DEPART- 
MENTS AT THE END OF EACH MONTH. 

INCIOENTLY, IT HAS DEVISED A SALIENT REFINEMENT IN THE AUTO MAINT- 
ENANCE COST PRESENTATION WHICH GOES INTO EFFECT EARLY 1970-71. The IN- 
novation is oesigneo to identify services of an outside contractual nature. 
as a result, the ratio of shop service to those being "farmed out 11 will be 
much more concisely defined. 

Extended use of computer services is also being planned out with per- 
sonnel in the Controller's E.D.P. division. 

The Shops hope to come up with a computerized source of historical 
DATA WHICH will assist in the repl a cemen t-of-veh I cl es program. 

Optimistically, this new management tool will serve to hflp implement 
a uniform program of eouipment replacement city-wide. 

The Office staff is directed by Edward Stone, Senior Management 
Assistant and consists of a senior account clerk, one clerk-typist and 
A PER diem time-roll preparator. 



- 15 - 



FIRE APPARATUS SHCP: 



The Fire Shop is staffed with eight (8) Automotive Machinists 
(1 Automotive Machinist - part time, subject to available funds); one 
(1) Sub-Forfman Automotive Machinist; one (1) Automotive Serviceman; a,\c 
one (1) Automotive Machinist Foreman, Mr. Leonaro Counihan. 

This Shop ccmplfted 975 Shop jobs, changed 212 batteries in the ficll, 
lubed 233 pieces of Fire Apparatus ano responded to 3,145 field repairs. 

Included in the total of jobs completed on Fire Apparatus were: 



32 
153 
95 
4 9 
73 
86 
63 
37 
^5 
104 
40 
86 
79 



81 

245 

13 

4 

1 

13 

15C 

10 

32 

4 

1 



Major engine overhauls 

Minor engine repairs 

Fire °umps and related repairs 

Small engine and motor repairs 

Chassis repairs (springs, mufflers, frames) 

Clutch replacements and adjusted 

Transmission overhauls and repairs 

Differential, axle repairs 

Road calls to make repairs 

Ac c i dents repa i red 

Radiators repaired 

Tun e-ups 

Modifications: Protective covers, installation of flectric 

fuel pumps, replace valve push rods in ten (10) s i x cylinder 

continental engines, modified hose beds, made and installfd 

axe holders, installed amber warning lights in tractor cabs 

so tillerman could warn driver, and make and install anti- 

dieseling valve shields 

eody repairs other than accidents 

Electrical repairs 

Booster tanks repaired and coated 

New pieces of apparatus equipped 3 - T.C. and 1 - aerial. 

Conversion: C.D. Auxiliary to a Diesel Fuel Wagon 

Steering gear assemblies 0. H. 

Various brake jobs: Air leaks, compressor repairs, air 

chambers, M.G.M. cylinders and various air valves replaced. 

Wheel alignments ano balance 

Aerial hydraulic repairs 

Pieces of apparatus cannibalized 

Triple Combination Engine Co. repowered. Obsolete gasoline 

engine removed and modern diesel engine installed. second 

unit started for completion early in next fiscal year. 



- 16 



FIRE APFARATU5 SHOP (cont'd) 



LADDtR SHCP; Staffed by two ( 
built 71 various size and type wood 
street signs for the department of 
cast pressure plate for cc^ nozzle 
pressure plate for hyorant discharg 
plates, two (2) patterns for a 3" a 

They repaired old patterns, mo 
other departments and sub-shops. t 

BLOCKS, GlEASON SADDLES, DIFFERENT 

Fire Department, made benches, boxe 
cut glass for gauges, windows, and 

AND DEPARTMENTS UNDER CENTRAL ShOPS 



2) Pattern Makers. Repaired and re- 
ladders, MADE TWO (2) PATTERNS FOR 

Public Works, a master pattern and 
handles, a master pattern and cast 
e seats, a pattern for door striker 
no k" adapter rings for fire APPARATUS. 

DIFIEO OLD PATTERNS, MADE PATTERNS FOR 
HEY ALSO MADE SPRINKLER WEDGES, CHOCK 
DEGREE WEDGE BLOCKS FOR SAN FRANCISCO 
S, CABINETS, REPAIRED OFFICE FURNITURE, 
ALL THE WOOD WORK FOR THE OTHER SHOPS 



MADE 
SUB- 
S CHO 

AND 
SHAR 
MADE 
STAT 

BUMP 
MAIN 
C ANN 



BLA 

AND 
SHOP 
OLS , 

Mad 

INST 

PENE 

AN D 

I ONS 

The 

ERS , 
TA IN 
I B AL 



CKSMITH 



REPA IRE 

s . Ma de 
High Pr 

E F I TT IN 

ALLED PR 

D 143 AX 

INSTALL 

AND IN 

Y ALSO S 

REPLACE 

ED FENCE 

I ZED OLD 



SHCP ; Staffed by 1 Blacksmith and 2 Metalsmiths. They 

D ALL HEAVY METAL FITTINGS FOR THE FlRE DEPARTMENT, AND 

AND TEMPERED TOOLS, MADE REPAIRS FOR THE PUMPING STATIONS, 
ESSURE SYSTEM, AND SEWAGE PLANTS. 

GS, BRACKETS AND INSTALLED THEM ON NEW FIRE APPARATUS, MADE 
OTECTIVE PARTITIONS IN POLICE CARS, MODIFIED AMBULANCE BEOS, 
ES AND REPLACED HANDLES, MADE AND REPAIRED CEILING HOOKS, 
ED HOSE HANGERS IN FlRE HOUSES, MADE REPAIRS IN PUMPING 
THE STREET FOR HlGH PRESSURE. 

TRAIGHTENED BUMPERS, BENT OUTRIGGER JACKS, MAOE HOSE 
D SPRINGS, SPRING CENTER BOLTS, REPAIRED BOOSTER TANKS, 
S, GATES AND OTHER SHOP AREAS, REPAIRED OXYGEN HOLDERS, AND 
APPARATUS. 



PA INT SHOP; Staffed by three (3) painters and one (1) Body and Fender- 
man. 

Body and Fenderman repaired 104 accidents to Firf apparatus and many 
non-accioent body and fender repairs. 

Painters painted all damageo areas done by accioents ano non-accidents, 
painted three (3) fire scorcheo pieces of apparatus, painted hose bumpers, 

BLOCKS, WOOD AND METAL BOXES, GlEASON SADDLES, REPAIRED OFFICE FURNITURE, 

all brackets, fittings} repaired units for apparatus, axe handles, ceiling 
hooks, refinisheo 288 scott a|r bottles, stenciled covers, apparatus, made 
special Police and Sherrif stars, installed City seals, Police stars and 
Fire department seals. They scrapped, sanded, oiled shellacked and var- 
nished 71 LADDERS, LETTERED AND PAINTED ENGINE COMPANY PEGS, T0UCHEO-UP 
BRACKETS AND SCREWS ON NEW APPARATUS, PAINTED 28 MAP TUBES AND PAINTED OVER- 
FLOW FROM SUB-SHOPS AT CENTRAL SHOPS. 

L UPHOLSTERY SHCP; Staffed by one (1) upholsterer. Maoe and installed 

STRAPS ON GLEASON VALVE SADDLES, SCOTT A|R PaC HOLDERS, SAFETY SEAT BELTS, 

Truckman's safety belts, Officer's flashlight holder and belt, hose and 
ladder straps, pouches, made many various size, type, and length straps and 

BELTS, MADE CIRCULATOR BAGS, NAIL BAGS, HELMET STRAPS, GlEASON VALVE DUST 
COVERS, SHOWER CURTAINS, TOOL BOX COVERS, HOSE BOX COVERS, REPAIRED SALVAGE 
COVERS, REPAIRED STOKES STRETCHERS, MADE COVERS FOR AERIAL CONSOLE, RE- 
UPHOLSTERED SEAT CUSHIONS, LAZYBACKS, FOR THE VARIOUS SHOPS, MADE SPIKE TIPS 
FOR AXES, PIKE POLES, AND LADDER SHOES, HOSE BUTT SHIELDS, CUT GASKETS ANO 
REUPHOLSTERED OFFICE FURNITURE FOR VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS AND ALL OTHER 
WORK RELATED TO HIS CLASS. 



- 17 - 




1958 TRIFLE COMBINATION PUMPERS MODERNIZED. 




TRUCK 5HCF 

Under the supervision of Mr. Anthony DelNegro, Auto Machinist, Fore- 
man, with a staff of 1C Auto Machinists, 2 Automotive Servicemen, 1 Black- 
smith, and 1 Body and Fender Worker; comprising the main heavy duty area at 
80C r v uiNT Street - in aooition to other sub-shcps and staffing as listed 
below. 

Truck Shop functions include the general maintenance anc repair of a 
very wide category of heavy motorized equipment such as 10 WHEEL JUMP TRUCKS, 
MECHANICAL sweepers, tractors, farm equipment and special PURPOSE CONSTRUC- 
TION AND OFF THE ROAO ROLLERS, SCRAPERS, ASPHALT LAYERS, BURNERS, BACK-HOES, 
AND CRANET. 

Services of this Shop include an established preventive maintenance 
program covering the above category of equipment during the night time hours 
Monday through Friday. 

Cur Preventive Maintenance Program has substantially reduced the down 
time cf daily operated heavy equipment, mainly because minor defects are 
noted and corrected before developing into major breakdowns. much of th 
work is oone at night, substantially reducing loss of productive time by 
drivfrs. work crfws and usf of valuablf equipment. 



irious departments. 
During the fiscal year 1969-70, 1986 total job orders were processed 

THROUGH THIS ShOP. 

CARBURET; R aN3 ELECTRICAL (Truck sub-shop) 

Staffed by 1 Automotive Machinist specializing in electrical and fuel 
systems maintenance and repair. 

Additional work by this section consists of automotive rewiring ano 
electrical trouble shooting in conjunction with other machinists in the unit, 

QUINT STREET SERVICE STATION (Truck sub-shop) 

Staffeo by 1 Automotive Serviceman Monday through Friday, and 2 Auto- 
motive Servicemen on Saturdays, on a rotating 8 hour and k hour shift. The 
Saturday crew servicing those vehicle not available during the normal work 
week, during the year 1969-70, this station dispensed 133,105 gallons of 

GASOLINE, 10,811 QUARTS OF OIL AND SERVICED 1750 VEHICLES INCLUDING F.M. 
INSPECTIONS. 

19^ AVENUE SERVICE STATION (Truck sub-shop) 

Staffed by 1 Automotive Serviceman, Monday through Friday. Dispensed 
53,210 gallons of gasoline, 523 gallons of oil and serviced and inspected 

1C<k VEHICLES. 

This unit serves the various department vehicles operating in the out- 
lying WESTERN DISTRICTS OF THE ClTY. 



- II 



^ U INT STREET TIRE SHCP (Truck - sub-Shop) 

Staffed by 2 Automotive Servicemen, this shop handles the tire services 
for all City vehicles, including in-shop repairs and emergency road calls 
and maintains adequate tire stocks to serve the various department fleets. 
The year's activities closed with: 

1,226 New tires mounted 

1,05^ Recaps mounted 

152 In-Service tires repaired 

320 Road call services 



2,752 TcTAL JOBS PERFORMED 



In ADDITION, TO REGULAR WHEEL BALANCING SERVICES AS REQUIRED ON 
VARIOUS TRUCKS AND PASSENGER VEHICLES. 

ARMY STREET SERVICE ST AT ION (Truck sub-Shop) 

Staffed by 1, 7315 Automotive Machinist, Sub-Foreman, Mr. Joseph Frisella, 
It 7313 Automotive Machinist, and k , 7^10 Automotive Servicemen. 

The function of this unit lies primarily in servicing the Department of 
Public Works' fleet. Operating on a 16 hour a day basis covering two shifts. 
The night shift being concerned mainly with re-fueling, general servicing 

AND PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE of this large D.P.W. FLEET. 

Services rendered include dispensing of gasoline, oils, burner fuels 
and repairs to miscellaneous equipment such as mowers, pumps, chain saws, 
compressors, light plants, air hoses, portable lamps and minor vehicle ad- 
justment and repairs. 

The station dispensed 307*297 gallons of gasoline; 11,418 gallons of 
kerosene and 3 , ^5^ gallons of oil, and handled a total of 2,116 service jobs 
including p.m. inspections and minor repairs. 



19 



AUTOMOBILE SHCP 

This Shop is staffed with seven Automotive Mechanics, two Automotive 
Servicemen, and one Automotive Mechanic, Foreman, Mr, Ed. Franke. 

This Shop is responsible for the repair and maintenance of 905 City 
owned vehicles, both passenger and light truck type vehicles. This year's 
addition to the vehicle inventory was 18 leaseo vehicles AND twc surplus 
military jeeps. 

a major project accomplished was the special outfitting of ~*>2 police, 
6 Fire, 3 Sheriff's and 65 other vehicles for various departments. Special 
outfitting of the two military jeeps included complete mechanical tune-up 
and adjustments plus installation of roll bars, new tops, and complete 
re-painting for foi ice beach and park patrols. 

An INCREASE OF 206 JOBS WERE COMPLETED THIS "EAR TO BRINC THE YEARLY 
TOTAL TO 3,122 JOBS DONE. 

A LISTING OF WORK COMPLETED INCLUDES 555 BRAKE JOBS AND THL SAFETY 
INSPECTION ANO REPLACEMENT OF DRUMS, WHEEL CYLINDERS AND HYRAULIC LINES, 
5^9 TUNE UPS WERE DONE WITH OUR ELECTRONIC ENGINE TESTER FOR TOP ENGINE 
PERFORMANCE. 65 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS WERE OVERHAULED AND COMPLETELY RE- 
BUILT. 79 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS WERE SERVICED WITH MINOR ADJUSTMENTS AS 
REOUIREO. 20 COMPLETE MOTOR OVERHAULS AND 11 VALVE GRINDS WERE COMPLETED. 
15 STANDARD TRANSMISSIONS ANO CLUTCHES WERE OVERHAULED. 184 ROAD SERVICE 
CALLS WHICH INCLUDED ON THE SPOT REPAIRS OR TOWS TO THE ShOP. 1 , 308 JOBS 
OF A MISCELLANEOUS NATURE REQUIRING ONE TO THREE DAY SHOP TIME WERE PER- 
FORMED FOR VARIOUS DEPARTMENT VEHICLES. 

The ACCIDENT REPAIRS NUMBERED 327. ^0 INSURE FAST REPAIRS TO EMERGENCY 
VEHICLES, TURN-INS FROM THE PREVIOUS YEAR HAVE BEEN STRIPPED FOR REPLACE- 
MENT PARTS, SAVING VALUEABLE TIME AND LOW COST FOR REPAIRS. In MOST CASES, 

vehicles involved in minor accidents can be returned to service in a very 
short time at minimum cost. 

Vehicles involved in major accidents that would normally be a total 
loss can be repaired at low cost and returned to SERVICE BY USING SUCH 

"CANNIBALIZED" PARTS AND BODY SECTIONS. 



- 20 - 



M ACHINE SHCP: 

During the fiscal year 1969-70, this s hop serviced a total of 827 
joes. The compliment of the Machine Shop consists of 9 Maintenance 
Machinists and 1 Maintenance Machinist, Foreman, Mr. John J. Raos. 

The areas in which this Shop renders services are in the public 
schools, maintaining all machine tools and hand tools of the Industrial 
Arts section of the School Department. The complete over-hauling of the 
sheet metal, band saw, and metal lathes in the multi-purpose shop at 
Aotos Jr. High School. The moving and re-locating of all the machine 

TOOLS OF THE MULTI-PURPOSE SHOP AT ApTOS Jr. HlGH SCHOOL. ThE COMPLETE 
REPAIR OF THE WOOD WORKING EQUIPMENT AT LUTHER BuRBANK JR. HlGH SCHOOL. 

ALL BLOWERS, FANS, AND PUMPS RELATED TO THE HEATING SYSTEM IN SCHOOLS 
ARE SERVICED BY THIS DIVISION OF CENTRAL ShOPS. 

The Machine Shop also repairs and services the water feed pumps in 
the boiler room at poly hlgh school and the repairs to the large folding 

OOORS LOCATED IN THE GYM BUILDING OF WoOOROW W|LSON HlGH SCHOOL. ThIS 

Shop also repairs and services all the roll-up doors located in the Fire 
houses throughout the clty, repairs the sump pumps, circulating pumps, 

AND BLOWER LOCATED IN THE Park SYSTEM OF THE RECREATION AND PARK DEPART- 
MENT. 

The High Pressure water-system, in providing water necessary to 

FIGHT LARGE FIRES IN THE ClTY, REQUIRES THE SERVICES OF THE MACHINE Shop 

in keeping in good working oroer the machinery, boiler room equipment, 
and fire hydrants to carry out this function. 

The sewer treatment plants, consisting of the South-East, North 
Point, Richmond and Sunset plants, are kept in repair by k Machinists 

UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF THE MACHINE ShOPS 1 FOREMAN. 

The Maintenance Machinists in these plants repair and maintain 
machinery necessary to carry out a 2k hour a day operation of these plants. 

The men assigneo to these plants repair, rebuild, and manufacture 
parts for various pumps, filter driers, gas blowers, and other related 

MACHINERY NECESSARY TO THE OPERATION OF THESE PLANTS. ThEY FURTHER REPAIR, 

and completely overhaul, the main lift pumps, repair the feeo water pump 
in the plant boiler room and repair the vacuum pump on the filter blanket. 

The Hose Shop is a sub-section of the Machine Shop. This unit is 
charged with the inspection, repair, and distribution of all fire hose as 
well as the repair and maintenance of hose of all types used in other 
departmen ts . 

During the past fiscal year, 1969-70, 50,000 feet of new hose was 
inspected, tested, labelled, and distributed to the various companies in 
the Fire Department. 

Over 20,000 feet of in-service fire hose was inspected, repaired, 
and sent back to the f ire companies. 



- 21 - 



RECREATION AND PARK AUTOMOTIVE SHOP 



The Golden Gate Park automotive shop is located at 3"° Avenue and 
South Drive in the Park and is staffed with three Automotive Machinists, 
one Automotive Serviceman and one Automotive Machinist, Foreman, Mr. James 
Elliot. One Automotive Machinist has been employed part time subject to 
available funds as extra help and vacation relief. 

The July 1, 1970 count of Recreation and Park automotive and power 
operated machines and vehicles has now reached a total of h-22 units. 

The FISCAL YEAR 1969-70 SAW A TOTAL OF 1620 REPAIR JOBS PROCESSED 

through this Shop. Included in this group were 5 major engine overhauls 
(Trucks), 1 Case back-hoe motor overhaul, 1 Case loader frame reconstruction, 
1 Wayne Chip°er body and drive gear overhaul. 

The Preventive Maintenance Program ts as yet drastically curtailed 
due to lack of personnel. This has the aoverse effect of increasing the 
requirement for major repairs and extending the down-time of the machines 

TO THE DETRIMENT OF THE RECREATION AND Park DEPARTMENT. 

The Park Shop fuel station dispensed 110, 280 gallons of gasoline and 
6,95c quarts of oil during the fiscal year. 

HALL OF JUSTICE SERVICE STATION; 

This branch of the Central Shops is located on Bryant Street, West 
of the Hall of Justice. It provides fuel and service to Police Depart- 
ment vehicles and supplies gasoline ano oil to other City vehicles. The 
Station is operated 7 days a week from 7 A.M. to Midnight and is staffed 
with 8 Automotive Servicemen, 1 Automotive Serviceman, Sub-Foreman, Mr. 
Robert Desmond, 2 Automotive Mechanics and one Automotive Mechanic Sub- 
Foreman (LT), Mr. George Maggiora. 

The convenient down-town location ano the accelerated useage of Police 
vehicles continue this station as a high volume distribution point of fuel 
and lubricants for City vehicles. 

The past year shows the following services performed: 

Gasoline dispenseo 562,732 

Oil dispensed 1o,136 

Tow jobs 1,168 

Tires changed (new & recaps) 1,989 

Batteries serviced (new or charge) 622 

Lube and service jobs 1,685 

Mechanical repairs 6,891 

MCTC^CYCLE SERVICE 

Lubed 584 

Tireschangeo 127 

3* TTER I ES 212 

Rera irs 287 



22 - 



CONCLUSION 



The 1969-70 FISCAL YEAR WAS COMPLETED WITH A TOTAL OF 7,52*+ JOBS 
BEING COMPLETED BY THE CENTRAL ShOPS. The AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT IN- 
VENTORY NOW TOTALS 2 , 1 89 UNITS. 

In both areas an increase is shown OVER the previous fiscal 

YF A R . 

Budget allocations to the Central Shops and vehicle replacement 
WITHIN the various departments was reduced to a bare minimum during 
the fiscal year. 

Quoting from the Budget Statement of the Finance Committee, May 12, 
196 a : " Maintenance and Repair of Automotive Equipment: All items reduced 
to amount budgeted in 1968-69." 

" Automcb i l es : All replacement and new vehicles eliminated unless 
absolutely essential to operation of department." 

Certainly these attempts by the budget authorities to reduce the 
City's vibrational costs are commendable. 

It is apparent, however, that despite the tight control on the 
maintenance, repair ano replacement of automotive EQUIPMENT there is 

NO REDUCTION IN THE NEED FOR, AND THE USE OF, THESE VEHICLES BY THE 
VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS. 

The END RESULT IS A GRADUAL DETERIORATION OF THE PHYSICAL CONDI- 
TION of the City's automotive fleet in spite of the best efforts of 
the Central Shops. 

Without a well defined replacement program, worn out and obsolete 
vehicles PLACE an inordinate demand on the maintenance and repair 
bedget; WHILE, at the same time, the economy of the automotive inoustry 
is gradually reducing the availability OF REPLACEMENT PARTS for the 
older eq1iipmfnt. 

If this policy is to continue, condition of the City's automotive 
equipment will become more dilapioateo ano inefficient to the detriment 
of the using departments and ultimately the citizenery of the clty and 
County of San Francisco. 

Again we urge that the City establish a replacement criteria in 
keeping with modern fleet management practice. i t should be a con- 
servative program that will permit us to obtain the maximum use of 
thf machine within its most economical age and mlllage limit with re- 
placement to be effected when the projecteo cost of repairs approaches 
0° fyceeds the value of the unit. 



23 



JULY 1, 1970 



CENTRAL SHOPS ORGAN I ZAT I CN A|_ CHART 
80C QUINT STREET 

■ 7150 General Superintendent of Shops 

- 7277 Assistant Superintendent of Shops 

- 18^ Senior Management Assistant 

■ 1632 Senior Account Clerk 

- 1630 Account Clerk 

- 1424 Clerk-Typist 



TRUCK SHOP 

- 7? 5^ Foreman 

- 7313 Alto Machinist 

- 7313 Auto Machinist (DPW YARD) 

- 7^1^ Auto Serviceman - Truck 

- 7MC Auto Serviceman 
_ 7^10 A,jto Serviceman - Station 

T|ce SHCP 

2 - 7^1C Auto Serviceman 

BODY SHCP 

3 - 7306 Body f , Fenoer Man 

BLACKSMITH SHCP 

3 - 7389 Metalsmi th 
1 - 730.^ Blacksmith 

MACHINE SHCP 

1 - "237 Maint. Machinist Foreman 
3 - 73^3 ^aint. Machinist 

k - 73^3 Maint. Machinist (Sewage Plant) 

2 - 73^3 Maint. Machinist (Schools) 

WATCHMAN 

3 - 7^10 A UT0 Serviceman 

FIRE HCUSE DELIVERY 



1 - 01 Chauffeur 

1 _ 7M0 Autc Serviceman - 19^ Avenue 
'1 - 72+10 A uT o Serviceman - D of E Yard 

DPW YARD (SERVICE STATION) 

'1 - 7M0 Auto Serviceman (day) 

2 - 7^+10 Auto Serviceman (Night Gas) 
1 - 7U1C Autc Serviceman (Night FM) 

1 - 7315 Auto Machinist - Sub-Foreman 



5HCP 

i - 72^+9 Foreman 
7 - 7381 Auto Mechan i c 
1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman 
*1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman 
•1 - 7^+10 Auto Serviceman (Health 



Garage) 



F IELD SERV ICE 
1 - 7313 Auto Machinist 
FIRE SHOP 

1 - 725^ Foreman 

1 - 7315 Sub-Foreman 

7 - 7313 Auto Mach in ist 

2 - 7*4-10 Auto Serviceman 

2 - 7358 Fattern Maker 

1 - 7387 Upholsterer 

3 - 7309 P* inter 

(1) - 7309 Fainter (XF) 

HALL OF JUSTICE 

*1 - 7382 Sub-Foreman 

2 - 7381 Auto Mechanic 
•1 - 7^12 Sub-Foreman 

*8 - 7^+10 Auto Serviceman 

PARK SHCP 

1 - 7254 Foreman 

3 - 7313 Autc Machinist 
*1 - 7^+10 Auto Serviceman 

*1 - 1936 General Storekeeper 
*1 - 193^ Storekeeper 



(N ight PM) 



* ?1 Budgeted 

79 WC (Work Order) 

1_(xF)(Extra Fund) 

101 



24 



Number of City-owneo vehicles by Department 
Per IBM Inventory run as of July 1, 1970 



DEFT 

N C V DEPARTMENT 

111 Adult Probation 

115 Assessor 

11? Citv Attorney 

11° ClTv Flanning 

123 Controller 

131 5.F. Disaster Corps 

141 District Attorney 

1^5 Fire Department 

1S1 Mayor 

161 Ftlice Department 

16S Fubl i c Defender 

169 Social Services 

170 Single Men's Rehab. 
173 Sheriff 

''Si SUPERVISORS 

165 FpoeATioN Officer 

1 8 7 L c G Cabin Ranch 

188 Hiocen Valley School 

213 Calif. A c a d emy ; Sc i en c ES 

221 Chief Admin. Officer 

223 Coroner 

233 Deft, of electricity 

?k3 Public Administrator 

245 Real Estate Dept. 

255 Registrar of Voters 

261 Tax Coll ector-Gen .Cff 

265 Weights-Measures 

311 Furc .-Gen . Cffice 

312 Furch. - Shops 

DEFT. CF FU3LIC WCRKS 

413 Architecture 

415 Bldg. Inspection 

415.1 F e d e ~. a l Aid 
M7 3ldg . Repair 

417.2 Traffic Fainting 
421 Engineering 
423 General Office 
^24 Fersonnel Admin 
425 Sewage Pumping Sta. 
427 Sewage Treat. Plants 
429 Sewer Repair D i v. 
431 Street Cln. «utos 



NC. CF 


DEPT 




NO. CF 


VEHICLES 


NC 


DEPARTMENT 


VEHI clf.s 


7 


D 
513 


:ft. of fublic health 




2 
2 


Admin istration 


6 


5?5 


Plague Survet lance 


2 


2 


527 


Daipy ; Milk I aspect. 


14 


1 


531 


Fcod & Sanitary Inspect 


15 


5 

L 


535 


Health Centers 


c; 


539 


Public Health Nursing 


1 


276 

4 


551 


Emergency Hospitals 


18 


553 


Hassler Hospital 


a 

* 


375 


555 


Laguna Honca WqSP. 


12 


3 
41 


557 
561 


S .F . Gen • i. . Hosp i tal 
Men tal Aomin. 


8 
2 


2 


567 


Mental Inst. Servicf 


3 


39 








3 








18 








5 


661 


Legion of Hcnor 


1 


2 


621 


De y oung Museum 


1 


s 9 


631 


Library 


6 


1 


651 


Rec & Park - General 


145 


5 


651S^ 


Rec 8c Park - Services 


277 


37 


661A 


City College 


2 


3 


661B 


John O'Conmell 


3 


1 


661E 


Shop Trucks 


9 


1 


661F 


Gardners A u to s , Etc. 


17 


5 


GMG 


Del l very trucks 


V 


10 

4 

38 


661H 


Administration 


4 


775 


SjF. PtjRT Commission 


70 



9 


681 


48 


683 


5 


686 


106 




27 




26 




2 




3 




2 




24 




120 




104 





DEPT. OF PUBLIC WCRKS (RCAD FUN D) 

Street Repmp 101 

Traffic Engineering 25 

Street Tree Planting 33 

TOTAL 2189 

Police Motorcycles 169 

GRAND TOTAL 2358 



25 



DOLLAR COST DISTRIBUTION 

OF CENTRAL SHOPS EXPENDITURES 

FISCAL YEAR, 1969-70 




- 26 - 



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-E S- -r- 



APPENDIX 



TABLE NO. I 





PURCHASE 


ORDERS PROCESSED 








1968-1969 




1969-1970 






Purchase 




Purchase 






Orders 


Amount 


Orders 


Amount 


General 


15,029 


$ 7,136,303 


14,472 


$7,613,725 


Education 


7,467 


4,462,828 


7,365 


4,658,663 


Hea 1 th 


6,102 


3,513,859 


6,019 


3,587,932 


Uti 1 ities 


6,510 


4,228,442 


6,292 


3,996,603 


TOTALS 


35,108 


$19,341,432 


34,148 


$19,856,923 



Purchases by 

Encumbrance 

Requests $38,769,403 $39,662,853 

TOTAL $58,1 10,835 $59,519,776 



TABLE NO. 2 
Expenditures 



Comparisons of expenditures with original budget for all operating 
appropriations except Personal Service for 1969-70. 



Account 

Contract Service 
9.311.200.000 

Materials & Supplies 
9.311.300.000 

Equipment 
9.311.400.000 

Premium-Official Bonds 
9.315.812.311 

Premium-Auto Insurance 
9.315.813.000 

Membership Dues 
9.311.800.000 



Totals 





Encumbered 






Budgeted 


& 


Expended 


Surplus 


Deficit 


$ 26,145 


$ 


29,581 




$ 3,436 


16,000 




15,176 


824 




3,150 




2,379 


771 




6,191 




9,556 




3,365 


38,293 




80,943 




42,650 


35,567 




33,457 


2,110 





$125,346 $171,092 



$3,705 $49,451 



Revenue 



Comparison of Revenues with Estimated Revenues - 1969-70. 





Estimated 


Actual 


Over 


Under 


Account 


Revenue 


Revenue 


Estimated 


Estimated 


Sale of Documents 










7061 


1,200 


623 


577 




Minor Sales 










7062 


6,000 


8,944 




2,944 


Sale of Grease 










7621 


700 


783 




83 



Totals 



$7,900 $10,350 



577 



$3,027 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Fiscal Year 1970-71 



September, 1971 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and con- 
tractual services for all departments of the City and County, including 
city-owned utilities, the San Francisco Port Commission, the San Francisco 
Unified School District and the San Francisco Community College; repairs 
and maintains automotive and other equipment for the various departments, 
except Public Utilities, and for the School District as requested; operates 
a central reproduction bureau for departments requiring its services; trans- 
fers to other departments for use or sells equipment and supplies no longer 
useful to any department of the city; maintains a perpetual inventory of 
equipment in the various departments; and operates central stores of the 
Purchasing and various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by the 
Shops on equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of Buying 
on new products, specifications and prices. 

PERSONNEL 



Employments totaled 199 permanent in four bureaus. The Organization 
Chart is shown in the Appendix. 

SUPERVISORY - June 30, 1971 

Administrative 

T. F. Conway - Purchaser of Supplies 
C. D. Morel lo - Secretary 

Bureaus 

Buyi ng 

J. C. Gavin - Assistant Director of Purchasing & Services - Bureau Head 

G. A. Clarke - Senior Purchaser 

C. J. Morrissey - Coding Supervisor (Acting) 

Equipment and Supplies 

J. H. Beck - Stores and Equipment Supervisor - Bureau Head 
J. A. Frantz - Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

Personnel and Accounts 

George Harley - Chief Clerk - Bureau Head 
R. A. Davis - Principal Clerk 

Reproduction 

Edward Fund is - Reproduction Manager - Bureau Head 

Shops 

A. M. Flaherty - General Superintendent of City Shops - Bureau Head 
E. R. Rames - Assistant Superintendent of City Shops 



SEPARATIONS: Retirements, Deaths 

The valued services of the following were separated from 
through retirement or death after years of meritorious accompl 

RET I RED 



City employment 
ishment. 







Approx. Years 




Name 


Position 


City Service 


Date 


Carter, Angela E. 


Offset Machine Operator 


21 .456 


9- 1-70 


Conway, Joseph T. 


Senior Storekeeper 


34.717 


10- 1-70 


Walton, Leonard E. 


Senior Storekeeper 


15.851 


10- 1-70 


Backstedt, !ria S. 


Senior Clerk-Typist 


27.674 


10- 1-70 


Vides, John G. 


Automotive Machinist 


22.609 


10-27-70 


Rei 1 ly, Patrick A. 


Storekeeper 


12.129 


2- 1-71 


Hewartson, Dorothy 


Stenographic Secretary 


27.985 


6- 1-71 


DIED 









Reels, Robert R. 



Maintenance Machinist 

WORK ACCOMPLISHED 



19. 



I -I 5-7 I 



The work accomplished in the fiscal year is described in more detail 
under the separate bureaus. 

Recapitulation is as follows: 



Bureau 


Unit 


1969-1970 


1970- 


-1971 


Buyi ng 


Purchase Orders 

Amount 


34,148 
$19,856,923 


$24 


37,769 
,672,399 




Encumbrance Requests 
Amount 


$39,662,853 


$33. 


,354,320 


Stores & 
Equipment 


Surplus Sales - Amount 
Major Stores Operated 


$104,988.11 
1 1 




67,930 
1 1 


Shops 


Job Orders 

Expenditures 


7,524 
1,425,541 


1 , 


8,496 
,589,839 


Reproduction 


Services rendered 
Amount 


175,487 




207,564 



- 2 - 



GENERAL COMMENTS 



The period covered by this report, while not marked by material 
changes in facilities, procedures and methods, saw steady progress 
being made. 

The specification and control section, initiated to make studies 
which cannot be done by present staff without curtailing and delaying 
service to other departments, continued on an intermittent basis 
because of lack of personnel. The need for expanding this function to 
full time is considered obvious in view of continuing technological 
advances in processes, equipment, materials and supplies. 

Activities of the Central Shops, Reproduction Bureau and the Bureau 
of Stores and Equipment are described and commented on elsewhere in this 
report. The filling of key positions with permanent personnel during the 
period of this report can be expected to be advantageous. 



- 3 



BUREAU OF BUYING 



This Bureau, procures materials and supplies, equipment and insurance 
and contracts for services, for all city departments, the San Francisco 
Unified School District and the San Francisco Community College. Except 
for term contracts based on estimated quantities, all buying starts with 
receipt of requisition from using department. Included in or incidental 
to the procurement function are the following: (outlined In detail in a 
previous report) 

I . Buying - Bids and Awards 

Preparation of bids, including contractual - and technical 
requirements; evaluation of bids; and award of bids. 

I I . Buying - Related Functions 

Analysis of records of average use; maintenance of 
specification file; new term contracts; and review 
of procedures. 

PERSONNEL 

The buying division is headed by the Assistant Director of Purchasing 
and Services and includes II assistant purchasers. The clerical staff, 
under the Bureau of Personnel and Accounts, is engaged in typing, mailing, 
opening and tabulating bids, maintaining bid index and specifications file, 
and typing contracts. Funds for some of these employments, both buying and 
clerical, are provided by other departments. 

Detailed employments are as follows: 

I. Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 

1 Senior Purchaser 
7 Purchasers 

2 Purchasers (Printing) 
I Assistant Purchaser 

OPERATIONS 

Purchasing work is assigned on a commodity basis with allowance for 
items of a special nature or in cases where seasonal peaks or vacation 
period make it advisable to temporarily deviate from this policy. 

Periodic meetings of the buying staff permit the exchange of ideas, 
explanation of improved procedures and generally keep the assistant 
purchasers informed as to the overall progress and problems. 

Every effort is made to process requisitions as rapidly as possible but 
delays occur due to lack of personnel, inadequate information furnished with 
requisitions, and failure of departments to submit requisitions promptly for 
equipment items that are to be grouped for purchase for purposes of standard- 
ization and economy. 



- 4 - 



BUREAU OF BUYING (continued) 

OPERATIONS (cont i nued ) 

In preparing requistions, departments are requested to furnish 
information that will indicate a standard of overall quality and 
usefulness suitable for actual use requirements and permit competition 
as required by the Charter and Administrative Code. A new form was 
devised for this purpose making it easier for departments to furnish 
desirable information for bid purposes. 

As time is available personnel are assigned to: 

1. Review specifications, forms and procedures. 

2. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing 
additional term contracts for articles and services where 
desirable. 

The need for a separate section to expand the above services is 
apparent if the department is to most efficiently and effectively perform 
its purchasing functions. This work is now being done on an intermittent 
basis as time is available. Every effort should be made to procure a 
full-time employment for this work. 

Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into for various 
service and commodities in general use by several departments or 
recurring use by a department. The main advantages are elimination of 
the time lag resulting when individual bids are requested and elimination of 
the cost involved in individual bids. 

New term contracts initiated during the year include: 

1. Blood Collection Tubes & Accessories, Disposable. 

2. Ferric Chlorida, Anhydrous. 

3. Fittings, Cast Iron Push-on Joint. 

4. Publishing Newsletter "Intercom". 

In addition to these new term contracts, old contracts are constantly 
being revised, specifications up-dated, no longer required items deleted 
and new items added. 

Major purchases included the following: 

Fire Department Uniforms 

Police Uniforms and Equipment 



- 5 - 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS 



George Harley - Chief Clerk 
Robert Davis - Principal Clerk 



Travel ing 
Requisitions; 



Purchase 
Orders: 



Tabulation of 
bids: 

Requi sition 
Register: 



Monthly Repetitive Purchase Orders are processed in 
quantity on a repeat basis. These are large numbers 
of requisitions as used by Public Health, Public 
Utilities, Public Works, Purchasing, Recreation and 
Park, Schools, Sheriff, Library, Controller, and 
S.F. Community College. 

New purchase forms and increased use of photographic 
processes in preparing bids and purchase orders have 
significantly speeded up the issuance of purchase 
orders. 

Microfilming of bids on Contract Proposals and 
Quotations continued. 

Cumulative weekly and monthly, as well as daily, runs 
of this register have been continued. It is indispen- 
sable in locating requisitions processed for purchase 
order. 



Vendor Index: 

Codes on Purchase 
Orders: 



Continued. 

Use of vendor Location Code, Buyer Code, and Commodity 
Code continued. 



Bid Index; 



Continued. 



The number of purchase orders to be prepared is not constant chiefly 
due to the fact that requisitions do not flow into the department in a 
uniform manner. Consequently, there are times when a high production may 
be desired when personnel is depleted by vacations (which cannot be 
spread over the normal vacation period due to conditions beyond our control) 
sickness, or otherwise. Our very limited temporary funds must be used in 
even more critical areas and at more critical times. It is hoped that 
sufficient funds for the temporary employments will be provided in the 
future. 

Sales of Charters, Codes and other documents amounted to $27,618.31. 

Discounts earned amounted to $73,019.00. 



- 6 - 



CODING DIVISION 



The Coding Division, under the Bureau of Buying, continues 
the development of the material and supplies coding system. 
The system is now in use by all requisitioning departments. 

Due to the many requests for new code numbers, and the 
cancellation of certain codes by the departments, constant 
changes and additions have been made. The departments 
affected by these changes were notified. 

All city departments were visited by personnel from our 
section, and instructed In the procedures and methods 
necessary in the writing of requisitions, using our new 
printed form. 

Through an instructional memorandum issued at the 1970 
budget meeting by the Coding Division, a closer relation- 
ship was realized between budget personnel of the many 
city departments, and this section. We were contacted 
by many departments as to the use of the correct O.E. 
numbers in listing their equipment budgeted items. We 
were also able to instruct them in the use of the coding 
procedure in setting up requisitions for the purchase of 
equipment. 

This past year has brought a noticeable increase in 
personnel from private and governmental offices, 
who have shown an Interest in the Purchaser's Coding 
System. Good public relattons have resulted from our 
efforts in answering the many questions of our visitors 
pertaining to the system. 

At our request, departments continue to send personnel 
for instruction, In coding procedures. With the constant 
changing of city department personnel this action Is 
necessary. 



- 7 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT 



The Bureau of Stores and Equipment operates and maintains a 
central warehouse and storerooms in various City Departments; receives 
and issues materials, supplies and equipment for all departments of 
the City and County of San Francisco; and makes miscellaneous emergency 
purchases for the account of the various agencies. This Bureau 
arranges for the sale of and sells surplus and obsolete personal property 
belonging to the City; exchanges equipment between departments, maintains 
a perpetual inventory of all materials purchased for the City and County 
of San Francisco, and makes periodic checks of such property. The Bureau 
maintains control of the entire automotive fleet, including the listing, 
insurance and the reporting of all accidents. 

The following locations are staffed and operated by the Bureau 
of Stores and Equipment: 



Name and Location 



Central Warehouse - 1 5th & Harrison Sts. 



Type 



Amount of Inventory 



Stationery 
Janitorial Supplies 
4000 Cases Foodstuffs 
Misc. Furniture 
Pipe, etc. 



7,782.41 
4,807.85 



Dept. Public Works 
Water Department 
Hetch Hetchy 
S.F. Intl. Airport 
Municipal Rai lway 



Health Dept. 



Social Services 

Recreation & Park 

Dept. Electricity 

Sheriff 

Central Shop Store 



2323 Army St. 

1990 Newcomb Ave. 

Moc casin, Calif. 

So. San Francisco 

2Uth & Utah Sts. and 

2 sub-stores 

General Stores) 

Washington & Mason) 

Elkton Yard (Bond Fund) 

Potrero and one sub-store. 

S. F. General Hospital, 

22nd & Potrero 

Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th & Dewey 

Hassler Hospital, Redwood City 

Single Men's Rehabilitation Center, 

Redwood City 

Golden Gate Park 

901 Rankin St. 

Hall of Justice Garaqe (Sub-Store) 



127,985.85 

685,293.30 

57,444.97 

36,141.24 

245,471.86 



337,576.80 

23,451.69 

124,488.42 

194,102.58 

337,284.84 

61,948.58 

2,208.19 

42,993.47 
70,529.26 
68,094.96 
34,912.09 



* Storage only - Amount included with departmental inventory, 



- 8 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



PERSONNEL 

The Sales, Inventory and Stores Division is staffed by the 
following: 

1 Stores and Equipment Supervisor 

1 Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

1 Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

1 Senior Clerk-Typist 

2 Inventory Clerks 

11 Senior Storekeepers 

21 Storekeepers (plus 1 Storekeeper on work order) 
8 Assistant Storekeepers 
1 Laborer 
TOTAL 1+7 



SALES DIVISION 

Fifteen sales were conducted during the fiscal year under 
the authority of Section 88 of the Charter. Sales activities in- 
cluded legal research into various aspects of different sales, 
preparation of sales, inviting interested buyers to bid, opening and 
awarding of bids, collecting and depositing all money received from 
buyers with the City Treasurer and keeping records of correspondence 
relative to the sales. 

The total revenue from the sales of 1970-71 was: $67,929.83. 
A general breakdown of the sales is as follows: 

Fire Hose $ 1,966.00 

Beds 212.50 

X-Ray Film 1+85.90 

C.I. Pipe & Fittings 27,171.37 

Soil Moisture Gauge 902.00 

Transformers 550.00 

Waste Paper IBM Cards *+, 190.0*+ 

Grease & Bones 683.1+2 

Sacks & Containers 388.75 

Misc. Copper - Brass 11,098.90 

Cars - Trucks 7,799.37 

Scrap Metal 12,315.11 

Miscellaneous 166.1+7 



- 9 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



INVENTORY DIVISION: 

This division has the assignment of maintaining the Equipment 
inventory of all City Departments; the investigation and reports to 
the Board of Supervisors on lost, damaged, or stolen items of equipment. 
During the fiscal year, a few of the Departments surveyed were: Tax 
Collector, Registrar of Voters, DeYoung Memorial Museum, Weights and 
Measures, Retirement, Art Commission, and Superior Court. A complete 
physical check of equipment and the Perpetual Inventory records updated 
on the above mentioned departments. 

During the fiscal year, we estimated or secured estimates from 
moving concerns for various moves required by City Departments or Agents. 
We recommend procedure, confer and set the dates and requirements for 
moving or other liaison detail. 

The accumulation of various Waste materials, such as, Waste paper 
(office records), Tab Cards (I.B.M.), X-Ray film, and miscellaneous 
scrap metal is gathered up by this Division for arrangement of disposal 
by sale. Surplus furniture and equipment that has further use is made 
available to other City Departments by transfer. 



- 10 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



STORES DIVISION 

Early in the new fiscal year, Civil Service lists were adopted 
for 1932 Assistant Storekeepers, 193^ Storekeepers and I936 Senior 
Storekeepers. The classes of 1932 Assistant Storekeeper, and 193^ Store- 
keeper were both entrance and promotional whereas the class of 1936 Senior 
Storekeeper was promotional only. 

From the promotional list of 1932 Assistant Storekeeper, we 
received two new employees and two Limited Tenure employees. The pro- 
motional list for 193^ Storekeeper changed one of our 193^ Limited Tenure 
employees to permanent 193 1 * Storekeeper and the entrance list provided 
us with three new 193^ Storekeepers. One of the 193*+ replacements was 
for Pat Reilly, who retired from Laguna Honda Hospital. 

A long time 1936 Senior Storekeeper, Joseph Conway, retired and 
was replaced by reassigning of the Senior Storekeeper from the Sheriff's 
Department to San Francisco General Hospital. The opening in the Sheriff's 
Department was filled by a new employee from the 1936 list. 

Two of our 193*+ Storekeepers advanced to 1936 Senior Storekeeper 
from the promotional list. One was a permanent call to Hetch Hetchy to 
replace Leonard Walton, who retired and the other was a Limited Tenure 
call to the Muni Railway Potrero Store. 

Work has started for the new San Francisco General Hospital 
and a new storeroom is in the future. 

Safety 1i terature, advice and suggestions are relayed to the 
storekeeping personnel on a continuing basis. 



- I I 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Reproduction Bureau provides a centralized service 
available to all City Departments for photography, offset 
printing, mimeographing, photostatting, blueprinting, micro- 
filming and self-service copiers. 

Funds to operate the Bureau are provided by Work Orders 
from over 70 departments that make use of the Bureau's 
facilities. Work done for City Departments during 1970-71 
amounted to $207,000. This is an increase of over 60% in 
the last five years. 

This period was marked by the retirement of one of our 
most experienced employees, Angela Carter, Photostat Operator, 
after 25 years of service. 

A Xerox 7000 was installed in Room 302, 450 McAllister 

Street for general departmental use. The 7000 can reduce 

copy from 11 x 17 to 8h x 14 or run 8h x 14 full size. It 

can automatically collate up to 40 pages. 

A magnetic tape operated typewriter (IBM MT/ST) is a new 
addition to the Bureau's equipment. Available to all the 
Departments, it will reproduce letters or addresses from a 
pre-recorded tape at high speed with perfect accuracy. It is 
hoped that several Departments will make use of this machine. 

An ancient, inefficient photoprint dryer was replaced by 
a new automatic dryer; and, a stroboscopic flash was added to 
the photo equipment saving a lot of time and money over the 
use of flash bulbs. 

EQUIPMENT 

1 42" Blueprint Machine 1 Power Wire Stitcher 

1 42" Ammonia Process Machine 1 Folder 

1 19" x 23" Process Camera 1 11" x 17" Camera-Platemaker 

1 14" x 17" Offset Press 1 18" x 24" Photostat Machine 

1 10" x 14" Offset Press 1 18" x 24" Electrostatic 

1 11" x 17" Automatic Offset Printer (Prints from 35mm Film) 

Duplicating Machine 1 16mm Two-sided Microfilmer 

2 8%" x 14" Mimeograph Machines 1 35mm Planetary Microfilmer 

1 26V 1 Power Cutter 1 11" x 17" 10 Station Collator 



12 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU (Continued) 



PERSONNEL 

1 Sr. Account Clerk 2 

1 Reproduction Foreman 1 

1 Sr. Offset Machine Operator 1 

1 Sr. Blueprint Machine Operator 1 

2 Offset Machine Operators 1 



Blueprint Machine Operators 
Photo-Lithographer 
Photographer (Part-time) 
Clerk Typist 
Clerk 



MAJOR RECURRING FUNCTIONS OF THE BUREAU 



All Departments 

Various Departments (20) 

City Attorney 

Board of Supervisors 

Purchasing 

Treasurer 

Recreation & Park 



Public Works Engineering, 
Bureau of Architecture, 
Recreation & Park, SFUSD 



Public Works, City Attorney 
and SFUSD 



Assessor, Public Works, 
Recorder, Real Estate, 
Purchasing 

Central Permit Bureau 



Departmental Budget Estimates 
Departmental Final Budget 

Annual Reports 

Opinions and other legal papers 

Calendars and Ordinances 

Bids, Specifications and 
Purchasing Records 

Microfilm Records of Checks 
Deposited 

Specifications for construction, 
maintenance and repair of 
buildings, parks and recreat- 
ional facilities. 

Contract sets of blueprints for 
construction, maintenance and 
repair of public buildings, 
streets, sewers and recreat- 
ional facilities. 

Photography in connection with 
construction progress, earth 
slides, accidents, redevelop- 
ment and planning. 

Blueprinting of Block Maps of the 
City and County of San Francisco 



Reproduction of Building Plans 
for contractors and architects. 



In addition to the major functions listed above the Bureau 
performs many hundreds of non-recurring jobs for City Departments. 
The greater part of this work is of an urgent nature; with dead- 
lines set by ordinance; advertised dates for bids; and the normal 
requirements of departments' deadlines which must be met. 



13 



BUREAU CF SHCP5 



The Central Shops, and allied facilities, provioe necessary 
mechanical maintenance and repair service for all cltv departments 
ano Bureaus, except Public Utilities. 

In addition, it is the responsibility of the Bureau to inspect, 
appraise, and make recommendations on all City owned vehicles contem- 
plated for replacement; aid the various departments in the writing of 
various specifications; and to receive and approve all new vehicles 
delivereo to the City ano County of San Francisco. 

Administration and major repair facilities are located at th? 
Central Shops, 800 wuint Street. 

Other installations are: Golden Gate Park Shop, providing maint- 
enance for Recreation and Park Department equipment; Hall of Justice 
Service Station, where fuel and lubricants are provideo for Police and 
other City cars, along with inspection ano light maintenance for Police 
vehicles. Department of Public Works, Army Street Yard where fuels, 
lubricants, and preventive maintenance inspection is provided Public 
Works vehicles. 19^ Avenue Fublic Works Station, Health Department 
Garage, and Department of Electricity Garage. 

The Administration of the Shops, under the Purchaser of Supplies, 

IS THE OIRECT RESPONSIBILITY OF Mr. AlBERT M. FlAHERTY, GENERAL SUPER- 
INTENDENT, aioed by Mr. Edmond A. Names, City Shops Assistant Superin- 
tendent. 

The Central Shops, Quint Street operation, has four main maint- 
enance shop areas. They are 1) Automobile, 2) Truck, 3) Firt Apparatus, 
k) Machine; and the following auxilliary shops: Blacksmith, Pattern and 
Ladder Shop, Paint, Hose Upholstery, Body and Fender, Tire, ano Service 
Stat ion. 

Along with the responsibilities for the maintenance and repair of 
mechanical equipment and school buildings, sewage plants, fumping 
stations, public buildings, etc., the shops maintains 2kos motorized 
units of the cltv owned fleet, an increase of f>c over the fiscal year 
1969-7C. These vehicles and machines are valued at approximately 
seven million dollars. 

The Bureau is staffeo with 101 employees. No adoiticnal per- 
manent EMPLOYEES HAVE BEEN ADDED THESE PAST SEVERAL YEARS, THOUGH THE 

Work Order system of financing permits us to obtain temporary employ- 
ments FOR SEASONAL OR "as NEEDED 1 ' PROJECT COMPLETION. 



- -\k - 



ACCOUNTING 



Budget year 1970-71 was the year in which the im,ps were 

OPERATED THROUGH INTERDEPARTMENTAL WORK CRDER REQUISITIONS. 

As A RESULT THE ShOPS ARE OPERATING WITHOUT P.ENEFIT OF CENTRAL- 
IZED APPROPRIATION LEDGER CONTROL. In ITS PLACE WE HAVE INITIATED 
A STRINGENT SYSTEM OF INTERNAL CONTROLS FOR THF VARICUS AVENUES OF 
EXPENDITURE. In EXCESS OF 3,^96 JOBS WERE COMPLETED DURINC TH" YEAR 
FOR THE VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS. 

In ADDITION TO MONITORING THE ShOPS SPENDING ACTIVITY, THE SEC- 
tion is responsible for developing monthly billings which are fur- 
nished to using departments on computerized statements. 

it also assumes control of the perpetual vehicle maintenance 
directory which lists some 2,'ic8 units of motorized equipment. 

Significant advancement in the use of the City's Data Processing 
facilities was made ouring the year with the cooperation of raymond 
Sommer, E.D.P. Division Programming Assistant Supervisor. As an 
example; a complete maintenance history of vehicles dating back to 
1968-69 is now available on computer tape. This information should 
prove of considerable value in making DECISIONS concerning the replace- 
ment OF OLD MOTOR VEHICLES. 

The ACCOUNTING AND GENERAL OFFICE STAFF WORKS UNDER THE SUPER- 
VISION of Eowaro Stone, Senior Management assistant. 



- 15 - 



FIRE APPARATUS SHCP 

The Fire Shop is staffed with eight Automotive Machinists, two 
Pattern makers, one Blacksmith, two Metalsmiths, one Upholsterer, 
three Painters, one Body and Fender Man and one «utcmotive Service- 
man . 

Two Foremen, Mr, Len Counihan and Anthony Del Negro, oversee 
and control the maintenance and repair of all apparatus and equip- 
ment used by our fire fighting force. 

This Shop processed a total of 9^+6 jobs through the various 
work areas for the year. 64c units of fire apparatus were repaired 
and returneo to service. 

The FIELD SERVICE MAN RESPONDED TO 2,931 SERVICE CALLS AND 

completed 2,267 repairs in the fire houses without nccess itatino the 
apparatus being out of service for any appreciable period of time. 

Shop personnel responoed to 208 battery service calls in the 
field and serviced and lubricated 252 units of fire apparatus in 
the Shop. 

Included in the total jobs completed for the Fire Department 



11 Major engine overhauls 
159 Minor engine repairs 

148 Fire pump and related repairs 

3 Major Fire pump overhauls 
36 Small engine ano motor repairs 

82 Chassis repairs (mufflers, springs ano frames) 
130 Clutch adjustments and replacements 

60 Transmission overhauls and repairs 
k2 Radiator repairs 

82 T UNE ups 

35 Special road calls to make repairs 

25 Differential ano axle repairs 

12 Booster tanks repaired and coateo 

61 Body repairs other than accidents 
21? Electrical Repairs 

15 Steering gear overhauls 
27 Wheel alignments and balance 
239 Various brake jobs: reline, MGM cylinders, air 
compressor, air leaks, air valves replaceo ano 
brake adjustments. 
h-5 Aerial hydraulic repairs 
3 Pieces of apparatus cannibalized 
1 Gasoline engine removeo and repowered with a 
Detroit oiesel 6V53 engine 

( con t' d) 



- 16 - 



FIRE APPARATUS SHCP CCNT«D 



2 


New Pi 


2 


New In 


1 


New re 


2 


New Fo 


1 


DPW k3 




MOD I F I 




OF VAL 




SPR I NG 




STAB I L 




BURNER 




ANO BR 




LADDER 


kd 


Genera 




STARTE 



ONEER TC ' S EQUIPPEO 

TERNATIONAL TRUCKS FOR B.O.E. EQUIPPED 

SCUE TRUCK EQUIPPED 

RO STATION WAGON BUSES 

1-709 piped to aoapt to S.F. Fire Department 
cation: 1 protective cab, replace 7 SETS 

VE PUSH RODS, INSTALL AIR CYLINDER TO OPERATE 
LOCKS ON 8 TRACTORS, INSTALL 2 FRONT ENO 

IZER BARS, INSTALL 19 AXE HOLDERS AND MOVE 
CANS, REPLACE k THROTTLE CABLES WITH RODS 

ACKETS, MAKE AND INSTALL bTOPS FOR AERIAL 
TO PROTECT RELIEF VALVE IN MAIN CYLINDERS 

TORS, ALTERNATORS, REGULATORS, SIRENS AND 

R REPAIRS 



PATTERN MAKER AND LADDER SHOP 

This shop is staffed by two (2) Pattern Makers. They repaired 
and rebuilt 86 various size and types of wooden ladders, inspected 
all ladders on fire apparatus, inspected all stock of new ladder rungs 
for wood beetles damage, and turned 75 rungs to size. 

Made low pressure hydrant discharge seat master patterns, ano 
aluminum match plates, high pressure nozzle cage remount patterns, high 
pressure 3 1/2 inch nozzle gate new core prints, k aluminum patterns, 
six 12 inch wear rings, spacers for teed water pumps, pump liner patterns, 
pump discharge, suction plates, transition plates, back wear plates, wear 
ring ano glands. repaired old and damaged patterns, modified old patterns 
and maoe new patterns for other departments and sub-shops. t h ey made 

WEDGES, CHOCK BLOCKS, GlEASON SADDLES, PEGS, PARTITIONS, HOLDERS, BENCHES, 
BOXES, CABINETS, REPAIRED FURNITURE, CUT GAUGE GLASSES, WINOOWS AND ALL 
OTHER WOOD WORK FOR THE OTHER SHOPS AND DEPARTMENTS UNDER CENTRAL ShOPS, 

This shop also manufactured five new laooers, two 35 ft. extension 
ladders and three 22 ft. fire escapes. 

BLACKSMITH SHOP 

This Shop which is staffed by 1 Blacksmith and 2 Metalsmiths manu- 
factured NEW TOOLS, REPAIRED 0AMAGED TOOLS, SHARPENED ANO TEMPERE0 TOOLS. 

The shop also made, and repaired, all heavy metal fittings for the Fire 
Department and sub-shops; made repairs for the high pressure pumping 
stations, the High Pressure System, ano sewage plants. 



- 17 - 



BLmCKSMITH SHOP CONT'D 

The blacksmith shop made fittings, brackets, holders and installed 
them on new fire apparatus, made ano installed -rotective partitions in 
Police cars, modified ambulance beds, made hose bumper hangers and fit 
same to hose bumpers, sharpened 1 1 8 axes ano replaced with new handles, 
made and repaired ceiling hooks, pike poles, repaired fire house brackfts 
fittings, hose hangers ano installeo in fire houses. 

They repaired Scott Air Pac holders, made and installed axe holders, 
Stoke stretchers, booster tanks, straightened bumpers, bent outrigger 
jacks, replaced springs, spring center bolts, maintained fences, gates 
ano other shop areas ano cannibalized olo apparatus. 

'HEY INSTALLEO A NEW JIB BOOM IN F|RE ShOP. 



Fh l,,T SHOP 

The PAINT SHOP IS STAFFED BY THREE PAINTERS ANO ONE B OY ANO 

fender man . 

The Body ano Fender man repaired 82 accidents to fire apparatus 
and made many non-a.cioent booy ano fender repairs. 

The Painters painteo all accident damaged vehicles. They painted 
290 Scott Air Fac bottles. They also painted many hose bumpers, ceiling 
hooks, pike poles, axe hanoles, wood and metal boxes, office furniture, 

BRACKETS AND FITTINGS FOR FIRE APPARATUS. ThEY PAINTED AND STENCILED 

blocks, covers, engine company pegs, fittings, accessories and apparatus 
ano installed f|r£ department ano clty seals. 

They scraped, sanded, oiled, shellacked, varnished and stenciled 86 

LADDERS. 

They painted one NEW RESCUE TRUCK WHICH WAS PURCHASED unpainteo. 



UPhOLSTERY SHOP 

This shop is staffed by one Upholsterer. He made and installed 
straps for Scott air Pacs, safety seat belts, Gleason saddles, officer's 
flash light holders, butt shields, hose and ladder straps, truckman's 
safety belts and made many various type and size belts and straps. Also 
circulator bags, helmet straps, Gleason valve dust covens, tool box 

COVERS, HOSE BOX COVERS, SHOWER CURTAINS. He REPAIRED SALVAGE COVERS, 
STOKE STRETCHERS AND MADE COVERS FOR AERIAL CONSOLES. 



He ALSO REUPHOLSTERED SEAT CUSHIONS AND LAZY BACKS, MADE PlKE 

pole tips, axe tip safety guards, made ladder shoes, cut gaskets, re- 
upholstered office furniture for various departments, made repairs for 
sub-shops at Central Shops and all others related to his craft. 

- 18 - 



TRUCK SHOP - HEmVY DUTY SHCP 

The: Truck Shop (Heavy Duty) is responsible f c r the maintenance 
and repair of the larger c|ty owned vehicles such as 1c wheel trucks, 
vans, tank wagons, mechanical sweepers, tractors, road and paving 
machines, pork lifts and crane mounteo vehicles; sewer repair and 
general construction equipment including c'mpressors, back hoes, pave- 
ment saws, core drillfirs and various types cf vehicle mounted pumps. 

The WORK INVOLVED HERE RANGES FROM MINOR PREVENTIVE MAINTE VANCE 

through major rebuilding of engines, bodies, chassis members, hydraulic 
systems and the related special equipment which is mounted on these 
various and specialized vehicles. 

The heavy duty shop is staffed by one Foreman, Mr, Joseph 

FrISELLA, ELEVEN AUTOMOTIVE MACHINISTS, ANC SIX AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE- 
MEN. One Automotive Machinist is assigned to the electrical and 
carburetor section. 

During the year this section of the Central Shots performed 
2,052 jobs which incluoed repairs, re-building and modifications. 
Notable among these was the designing and out-fitting of three "new 
look" low profile Police Patrol Wagons with maximum security features 

AND OIVIDED INTERIORS FOR SEPARATION OF THE SEXES ANd/oR AGGRESSIVE 

pr i son ers . 

Another project of note by this Shop was the re-cons truct i on of 

THE "ONE OF A KIND" ASPHALT B U R N I N G MACHINE. ThIS IS A VERY LARGE 
AND COMPLEX UNIT USED TO BURN OFF OLD STREET PAVING SURFACES PRIOR TO 
RESURFACING. A COMPLETE CERAMIC LINED FIRE BOX WAS BUILT AND OUTFITTEO 
FOR THIS UNIT, RESTORING ITS EFFICIENCY AND EXTENDING ITS USEFUL LIFE 
BY MANY YEARS . 

A GENERAL RESUME OF JOB PERFORMANCES BY THE TruCK ShOP DURING THE 

year follows : 

38 Complete engine overhauls 

27 Complete transmission overhauls 

176 Complete brake systems overhauled 

6 Complete overhauls of large pumps 

39 General Repairs (radiators, etc) 
220 General Repairs (Tune-ups, etc) 

1h-0 General Repairs (Iron wcrk, welding, etc) 

972 General Repairs (Miscellaneous) 

112 Re-Built (Starting motors) 

70 Re-Built (Generators) 

92 Re-Built (Alternators) 

6k Re-Built (Regulators) 

72 Re-Built (Carburetors) 

3^+ Re-Construction (*ccidfnts) 

TOTAL JOBS - 2,062 

In addition the Truck Shop, through its supervisory staff, is 
responsible for the operations at four other sub-shops as foliows: 



- 19 



TRUCK SHCP - HEAVY DUTY CONT'D 



QUINT STRElT GAS STATION 
Gasoline dispensed 
Oil oi spenseo 
Vehicles lubri cated 

19U3 AVENUE G»S STATION 

Gasol i ne dispensed 
Oil d i spenseo 
Vehicles lubricated 



146,204 gallons 
11,462 quarts 
1,832 



62,382 GALLONS 
1,9^4 QUARTS 
128 



;UI\T STREET Tl RE SHOP 
new tires mounted 
Re-caps mounted 
t | res repa i red 
Road calls (Tire Services) 

DEFT. OF ELECTkICiTY (GARaGE) 
Lubes and services 
Road calls, (Tires, stalls, etc) 



1,148 
989 
184 
360 



192 

52 



HALL OF JUSTICE SERVICE STATION 

This branch of the Central °hops is located on Bryant Street, 
West of the Hall of Justice, It provides fuel and service to Police 
Department vehicles ano supplies gasoline and oil to other City veh- 
icles. The Station is operated 7 days a week from 7 A.M. tc Midnight 
and is staffed with 8 Automotive Servicemen, 1 Automotive Serviceman 
Sue-Foreman, Mr. Robert Desmond, 2 Automotive Mechanics and one Auto- 
motive Mechanic Sub-Foreman (LT), Mr. George Maggiora. 

The convenient down-town location and the accelerated useage of 
Police vehicles make this a high volume distribution point of fuel 
and lubricants for City vehicles. 

The past year shows the following services performed: 

Gasoline dispensed 583,911 

Oil dispensed 16,5^1 

Tow jobs 1,164 

Tires changed (new & recaps) 1,320 

Batteries serviced (new or charged) 648 

Lube and service jobs 1,1 64 

Mechanical repairs 6,877 

MOTORCYCLE SERVICE 



Lubed 

Tires changeo 
Batter i es 
Repa irs 



474 
180 
231 
272 



- 20 - 



AUTOMOTIVE SHOP 

This Shop is staffed with seven Automotive Mechanics, two Auto- 
motive Servicemen, and one Automotive Mechanic f opeman, Mr, Eo Franke. 

The Automotive shop is responsible for repaip and maintenance of 
9h-h- City owned vehicles, which includes both passenger cars and light 

TRUCKS TO 3/ 1 * TON CAPACITY. Th|S YEAr's AOOITION TO THE VEHICLE IN- 
VENTORY was 8 Police driver training vehicles, 2 hospital security 

GUARD VEHICLES, 2 SHERIFF DEPARTMENT VEHICLES, AND 1 6 HcNOA 90' S TrAIL 

motorcycles for police park and beach patrol. 

Major projects accomplished was the outfitting of 8 Fire Depart- 
ment vehicles, 76 Police vehicles, and 62 vehicles assigned to various 
other departments. k2 police vehicles were eouipfed with specially 
manufactured security partitions, hidden rear door locks, ano roof 
light bars. 2 driver training vehicles were equipped with specially 
built roll bars and push bumpers. k ho using authority vehicles were 
equipped with the police vehicle package. 50 vehicles were made ready 
for delivery to napa for auction. 

Inside hood release controls were installed on all Police veh- 
icles FOR PROTECTION AGAINST BOMBINGS AND ENGINE TAMPERING. 

This year the Automotive shop has been certified by the California 
Highway Patrol as an official headlamp adjusting station and official 
motor vehicle pollution control device installation and inspection 
station. Four automotive mechanics have passed State examinations for 
installers ano adjusters for both stations. 

An increase of 56 JOBS were completed this year bringing the TOTAL 

TO 3,156 JOBS. 

A LISTING OF COMPLETED WORK INCLUDED 618 BRAKE JOBS AND SAFETY 
INSPECTION OF DRUMS, WHEEL CYLINDERS, AND HYDRAULIC L I N E. S . 6kk TUNE-'JPS 
WERE COMPLETED AND TESTED WITH OUR SUN ELECTRONIC ENGINE TESTER FOR TOP 
ENGINE PERFORMANCE. 68 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS WERE COMPLETELY OVER- 
HAULED AND ROAD TESTED. 79 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS WERE SERVICEO AND 
ADJUSTED TO FACTORY SPECIFICATIONS. 18 ENGINE OVERHAULS AND 58 ENGINE 
VALVE GRINDS WERE COMPLETED. 61 RADIATORS WERE OVERHAULED. 26 STANDARD 
TRANSMISSIONS AND CLUTCHES WERE OVERHAULED. 200 ROAD SERVICE CALLS RE- 
QUIRED ON-THE-SPOT REPAIRS OR TOWS TO THE ShCP. 1,050 JOBS OF MISCELL- 
aneous nature requiring one to three days shop time were performed for 
various department vehicles. 

Accident repairs numbered 33h-. Many vehicles involved in major 
accidents that wc u l d normally be a total loss tc the department have 

BEEN REPAIRED AT A LOW COST AND RETURNED FOR SERVICE. In MANY CASES 
VEHICLES INVOLVED IN MINOR ACCIDENTS WERE REPAIRED AND RETURNED TO 
SERVICE IN ONE TO TWO DAYS AT MINIMUM COST. ThIS HAS BECN ACCOMPLISHED 
BY CANNIBALIZING PARTS FROM THE PREVIOUS YEARS TURN-IN VEHICLES. 



- 21 - 



MACHINE 5HCP 

During the year a total or 731 various jobs were serviced through 

this division of Central 3 h:ps. The complement of the Machine Shop 

consists of 1 Maintenance Machinist Foreman, Mr. John Kaos and 9 Maint- 
enance Machinists. 

The areas in which this section of Central Shops renoers a service 
are in the Public Schools and the City College complex by servicing 

ALL MACHINE TOOLS AND HANO TOOLS OF THE INDUSTRIAL ARTS SECTIONS* ThE 

Machine Shop completed the overhaul and repairing of the machine shop 

EQUIPMENT OF ApTOS JUNIOR H|GH SCHOOL. ThEY SERVICED AND REPAIRED ALL 
THE MACHINE TOOLS AT MARINA Jr. HlGH, REPAIRED THE HORTICULTURE MACHINERY 

at City College and completed overhauling the boiler feed water pump in 
the boiler room at c|ty college. 

They also serviced and repaired a number of Fire House doors, the 
pressure reducing valves used by the Fire Department, a large numeep of 
hose shut-off valves, pressure guages, ano hose pipes used by the Fire 
Department. They repaipeo the boiler gas burner u . i ts used at High- 
Pressure pumping station located at 2nd and Townseno Street. 'hey 
completed repairs and re-building of the boiler feed water pumps used 
at the Civic Center Power House, located at the corner of Larkin and 
McAllister Street. 

The High Pressure Water System, providinc water necessary to combat 
large fires in the City, requires the service of the Machine Shop in 

KEEPING IN REPAIR THE H I G H - P R E S S U R E AND LOW-PRESSURE HYDRANTS. ThEY 

manufactured ano repaireo PARTS THAT are required in the op-ration of 
these hydrants . 

The sewer treatment plants, consisting of Richmond/Sunset, South 
East ano North Point, are kept in repair by k Maintenance Machinist 

UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF Mr. RaoS. 



The Maintenance Machinists in these treatment plants 
maintain machinery necessary to carry out a 2k hour-a-oay 



REPAIR AND 
OPERATION. 



The men assigneo to these plants repair, manufacture, and resuild 
parts for various pumps, blowers, filter driers, ano other related 

MACHINERY. They ARE ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR THE COMPLETE OVERHAUL OF LOW- 
pressure blowers, the h i g h -p r e s s u r e gas blowers and repair of the large 
sludge removal vac-pump. 

The Hose shop is a sub-section of the Machine Shop. This section 
is responsible for the inspection, re°air ano distribution of all F|RE 
hose. It is staffed by one Maintenance Machinist. 

During the year, 25,000 feet of hose was inspected, tested, and 
•distributed to the various companies in the Fire Department. 

Over 15,000 feet of in-service Fire hose was inspected, repaired, 
and sent back to the Fire Companies. 



- 22 - 



RECREATION AND PARK SHOP 

The Park Shop facility of the Central Shops is located in Golden 
Gate Park off South Drive ano 3rd Avenue. T he Shop is staffed with 
three Automotive Machinists, one a UTOMO tive Serviceman and supervised 
by Foreman James Elliot. One additional Automotive Machinist was 
employed limited tenure during the year. 

Each year there is an increase in the amount of mechanized equip- 
ment assigned to the Recreation and Park Department which must be 
maintained by the Shop. The Candlestick Park improvements, alone, re- 
sulted in the addition of new complex machinery for the care and use of 
Astro-Turf and the periodic conversions from a baseball to football 

F I ELD. 

Even greater mechanization of Recreation and Park activities 
should result if the recommendations of the recent Recrlation and Fark 
Task Force study are implemented. 

^uring 1970-71 1i559 repair orders were written including". 



2 1/2 TON DUMP 

Garbage packer 
ejector overha 
Case back hoe: 
Case terraload 

BU ILT 

International 
Utility type t 
body and fende 
Wayne Ch i pper ; 
A .C . Bucket lo 
shop. £7,500 
dealer's shop 

FoRO DUMP TRUC 
ASPHALT TRUCK, 
Gamet IME TRAIL 
HITCHES 



TRUCK ENGINE OVERHAULED AND CtMPLETELY PAINTED 

TRUCK; ENGINE OVERHAULED (oi'TSIDT contract) »NO 
ULED 

MAJOR ENGINE, BUCKET AND BRAKE REPAIRS 
er; COMPLETE ENGINE OVERHAULED AND BUCKET RE- 
farm tractor? major drive line repaired 
rucks; complete paint job including extensive 
r repairs 

major body reconstruction 
aoerj complete bucket reconstruction done in our 
engine ano track overhauled - completed at 

kj major conversion so truck can be used as 

(laooers, steps, tool box, etc.) 
er; rebuilt tc conform tc Park Department tow- 



FOLLOWING JOBS WERE DONE AT QuiNT STREET WITH PftRK DEPARTMENT 



, converted pickup truck tf plumber utility type truck ano 
pa i nted completel y 

, tree topper truck; extensive booy and fender ano tool compart- 
ment repairs were made and truck was completely repainted. 

"he Shop also dispenseo 116,23^ gallons of gasoline and 6,9^1 quarts 
of oil to the Park fleet and other departments of San Francisco. 



During this fiscal period, Shop management met and conferred with 



- 23 - 



RECREATION AND PARK SHOP CONT'D 



THE MEMBERS OF THE RECREATION AND PARK MAINTENANCE TASK . r ORCE. 

The PROBLEMS OF MAINTAINING THE EVER INCREASING NUMBER OF MECH- 
ANIZED UNITS OF THE DEPARTMENT WERE DISCUSSED IN DETAIL. 

IT WAS GENERALLY AGREED THAT THE SIGNIFICANT INCREASE IN EQUIP- 
MENT COUPLED WITH DELAYED REPLACEMENT AND LIMITED REPAIR FUNDS RESULTS 
IN THE UNDESIREABLE SITUATION WE HAVE EXPERIENCED THESE PAST SEVERAL 
YEARS. 

The Task Force report , made available to us in June 1971, gen- 
erally FOLLOWS THE RECOMMENDATION OF NOVEMBER 28, 1966 MADE BY THE 

Central Shops to the General Manager of the Recreation and Park Depart- 
ment. The root of the problem is limiteo finances, both for replace- 
ment and maintenance. The Central S H cps Report and recommendations 
of 1966 was unsuccessful in alleviating the situation. It is hoped 
the more prestigious Task F rce Report, backeo by the experience of 
private industry, might convince the administration of the need. 



ARMY STREET SERVICE STmTION 

Staffed by one 7315 Automotive Machinist, Sub-Foreman, Mr. Elmer 
Bryoen; one 7313 Automotive Machinist; and four 7^10 Automotive Service- 
men. 

The function of this unit lies primarily in servicing the Depart- 
ment of Public Works' fleet. It operates on a 16 hour a day basis, 
covering two shifts. The night shift is concerned mainly with re-tuei- 
ING, general servicing and preventive maintenance of this large D.P.W. 
fleet. 

Services rendered included dispensing of gasoline, oils, burner 
fuels, and repairs to miscellaneous equipment such as mowers, pumps, 
chain saws, compressors, light plants, air hoses, portable lamps and 
minor vehicle adjustment and repairs. 

The station dispensed 291,^3 gallons of gasoline; 5,183 gallons 
of kerosene ano 3,360 gallons of oil, and hanoled a total of 3,006 
service jobs including preventive maintenance inspections. 



- 2k - 




IMPROVED POLICE PATROL VAN DEVELOPED BY CENTRAL SHOPS FOR SAN FRANCISCO POLICE 
DEPARTMENT. A COMPACT UNIT FEATURING DUAL PRISONER COMPARTMENTS FOR MUTUAL SAFETY. 



i3|! 

SBS 



K 






SEB W m 



M'MA 
■ 




DIESEL FUEL WAGON 
USED BY FIRE DEPARTMEN 



as s r.s==s= C0ST T0 cm ' 




FIRE DEPARTMENT AERIAL TRUCK RAISED IN SHOP FOR SERVICE AND PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE INSPECTION. 
252 APPARATUS WERE SERVICED AND INSPECTED THIS FISCAL PERIOD. 



CCNCLUS ION 
During the fiscal year 1970-71 Central ^hops completed b,k®6 jobs 

ON THE VARIOUS UNITS OF ClTY OPERATED AUTOMOTIVE ANO MECHANICAL EQUIP- 
MENT. This is an increase of 12% over the previous fiscal year. 

The vehicle replacement program continues at a minimum level in 
spite of the urgent need for new vehicles by the operating departments, 

this results in excessive operating costs in the operation of a 
vehicular fleet due to overage and the corresponding increase in ex- 
tensive maintenance and repair. 



The Central Shops are attempting to al'.eviate this problem by 

REPLACING COMPLETELY WORN OUT VEHICLES WITH "TURNED In" VEHICLES IN 

RELATIVELY BETTER CONDITION. HERE IS A LIMIT TO THIS, HOWEVER, A S 
SERVICEABLE "TURN-INS" ARE IN SHORT SUPPLY. 



it is hoped that a reasonable replacement program for clty 
vehicles might soon be agreed upon by the budget authorities. 

Private industry has recognized that automotive equipment has a 
limited economical life span. most government agencies agree with 
this concept and have initiated programs of earlier replacement. 

Many cities are coordinating the responsibility for their ess- 
ential IN-SERVICr TRANSPORTATION operation WITHIN A SINCLE bureau or 
DEPARTMENT. T H AT DIVISION ACQUIRES THE VEHICLES AND THEN "LEASES 1 ' 
THEM TO THE OPERATING DEPARTMENTS FOR A FLAT PERIODIC FEE THAT WOULD 
INCLUDE OPERATING EXPENSES ANO A DEPRECIATION FACTOR. «T THE END OF 
A PREDETERMINED USEFUL LIFE A RESERVE FUND HAS BEEN ACCUMULATED FOR 
REPLACEMENT. We SHOULD CONTINUE TO INVESTIGATE AND CONSIDER TH_ AD- 
VANTAGES OF SUCH A POLICY. 

A PROGRAM OF REFRESHER TRAINING COURSES CONTINUES IN THE ShOPS 

at no cost to the clty. 3 hop craftsmen attendeo training session on 
Detroit Diesel engines, Allison automatic transmissions and Ford Disc 
brakes. Here the latest technology in the maintenance and repair 
of these oevices is made available to our mechanics. "long with 
these technical courses our supervisor attended a safety seminar 
sponsored by the national safety council. 

In CONCLUSION WE ARE PLEASED TO SAY THAT THi CENTRAL 3 HOPS ARE 
OPERATING WITHIN OUR W ORK OroER ALLOTMENTS IN AN EFFICIENT AMD PRO- 
ductive manner. 

The Shops are contemporary in concept ano are staffed with 
skilled and energetic craftsmen. every effort is made to ppovioe 
these employees with modern tools and equipment so that they might 
quickly and accurately diagnose and repair the vehicles and machines 
assigned to their care ano return them to service at the earliest 
fossidle time. 



- 25 - 



Number of City-owned vehicles by Department 
Per IBM inventory run as of July 1, 1971 



OEPT 




NO. OF 


D^PT 




NO. OF 


NO, 


DEPARTMENT 


VEHICLES 


NO. 


DEPARTMENT 


VEHICLES 


111 


Adult Probat i on 


7 




DEPT. OF PUBLIC HEALTH 




115 


assessor 


2 








117 


C i ty Attorn ey 


2 


513 


ADM IN I STRA T I ON 


7 


119 


City Fl ann i ng 


2 


525.1 


Comm. Disease 


2 


123 


Controller 


1 


527 


Milk & Dairy Inspect. 


14 


131 


S.F. Disaster Corps 


5 


531 


Food & oanitary Inspect. 15 


141 


District Attorney 


4 


535 


Health Centers 


5 


145 


Fire Departmen t 


282 


539 


Public Health Nursing 


1 


151 


Mayor 


5 


551 


Emergency Hospitals 


15 


161 


Police Department 


317 


553 


Hassler Hospital 


9 


161N 


Pol ice lease 


19 


555 


Laguna Honda Hosp. 


13 


165 


Public Defen der 


3 


557 


S.F. Gen'l. Hospital 


9 


169 


Social Services 


37 


561 


Men tal Aomin, 


2 


170 


S ingle Men * s Rehab 


2 


567 


Mental Inst. Service 


5 


173 


Sheriff 


39 








181 


Supervisors 


3 








185 


Probat i on Officer 


18 














187 


Log Cabin Ran ch 


5 








188 


Hidden Valley School 


2 


661 












Leg i on of Hono r 


1 


213 


Calif. Academy Science 


621 












DeYoung Museum 


1 


221 


Chief Admin. Officer 


1 


631 










6 


Library 


7 


223 


Coroner 


651 


Rec & Park -General 


150 


233 


Dept. of Electricity 


37 


651s 






243 






Rec & Park - Services 


303 


Public Administrator 


3 


661B 






245 






John 0' Conn ell 


3 


Real Estate Dept. 
Registrar of Voters 


1 


661E 


Shop Trucks 


10 


255 


1 


661F 


Garoners Autos, Etc 




261 






17 


Tax coll ector 


5 


661G 


Del i very Trucks 




265 






19 


We ights-Measures 


10 


661H 




4 






4 


Admin i stra t i on 


311 


Purch-Gen. Office 


669 


C 1 ty College 






PURCH-CEN TRAL ^HOPS 




9 


312 


39 








OEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS 


9 


775 


S.F. Port Commission 


62 


413 


« R CH I TECTURE 








415 


BLOG . I NSPECT I ON 


44 


DEFT, 


, OF PUBLIC WORKS (ROAD FUND) 


415.1 


Federal A i d 


5 








417 


Slog . Repa i r 


108 


681 


Street Repa ir 


97 


417.2 


Traff i c Painting 


28 


683 


Traffic Engineering 


28 


421 


Engineering 


26 


686 


Street Tree Planting 


40 


423 
424 


General Office 


2 








Personnel Admin 


3 








425 


Sewage Pumping Sta 


2 






2191 


427 


Sewage Treat. Plants 


25 








429 


Sewer Repair D i v . 


119 




Pol ice Motorcy cles 


199 
18 


431 


Street Cln. Autos 


104 




Police Hondas 



GRAND TOTAL 



2408 



-26- 



JULY 1, 1971 



CENTRAL SHOPS ORGANIZATIONAL CHA RT 
800 QUINT STREET 

■ 7150 General Superintendent of Shops 

■ 7277 Assistant Superintendent of Shops 

■ 1844 Senior Management Assistant 

■ 1632 Senior account Clerk 
• 1630 Account Clerk 

■ 1^+24 Clerk-Typist 



TRUCK SHOP 

- 725^ Foreman 

- 7313 Auto Machinist 

- 7313 Auto Machin-st (DPW YARD) 

- 7^10 Auto Serviceman - Truck 

- 7^10 Auto Serviceman 

- 7^10 Auto Serviceman - Station 



PASSENGER oriQP 

1 - 72^9 Foreman 
7 - 7381 «uto Mechanic 
1 - 7^-IC Auto Serviceman 
•1 - 7*+10 Autc Serviceman 
*1 - 7^10 Autc Serviceman (Health 

G arac r) 



TIRE SHCP 

2 - 7^+10 Auto Serviceman 

BODY SHOP 

3 - 7306 Body & Fender Man 

BLACKSMITH SHOP 

3 - 7389 Metalsmith 
1 - 7305 Blacksmith 

MACHINE SHOP 

1 - 7237 Maint. Machinist Foreman 
3 - 73^3 Maint. Machinist 

^ - 73^+3 Maint. Machinist (Sewage Plant) 

2 - 73^+3 Maint. Machinist (Schools) 

WATCHMAN 

3 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman 

FIRE HOUSE DELIVERY 

1-01 Chauffeur 

1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman - 19$ Avenue 
*1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman - of E Yard 

DPW YaRD (service STaTION) 

*1 - 7^+10 Auto Serviceman (day) 

2 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman (Night Gas) 
1 - 7*+10 Auto Serviceman (Night PM) 

1 - 7315 Auto Machinist - Sub-Foreman (Night PM) 



FIELD SERVICE 

1 - 7313 auto Machinist 







FIRE 


SHCP 


1 


- 


725^ 


For eman 


1 


- 


7315 


Sub-Foreman 


7 


- 


7313 


Autc Machinist 


2 


- 


7^+10 


Auto Ser v i ceman 


2 


- 


7358 


Pattern Maker 


1 


- 


7387 


Upholsterer 


3 


- 


73C9 


Pa inter 


(1) 


_ 


73C9 


Fainter (XF) 






HALL 


OF JUSTICE 


»1 


7382 


Sub-Foreman 


2 


- 


7381 


auto Mechanic 


*1 


- 


7h-12 


Sub-Foreman 


•8 


- 


7^10 


Auto Ser v i ceman 






PARK 


SHOP 


1 


- 


725^ 


For eman 


3 


- 


7313 


MUTO Mach I N 1ST 


*1 


- 


7h-10 


Auto Ser v i ceman 


M 


. 


1936 


General Storekeeper 


•1 




193^ 


Storekeeper 

* 21 Budgeted 

79 WO (Work Order) 

1 _ (XF) (Extra Fund) 

101 



-27- 



CENTRAL 5HCP EXPENDITURES 
Comparison of direct charges for 1970-71 with prior year 



1970-71 



1969-70 



1. PlRSONAL SERVICES 



Administrative salaries 

Shop Wages 

Retirement System Contrib- 

UTI ONS 

Social Security Contrib- 

uti ONS 
Miscellaneous work orders 



2. CONTRACTUAL SERVICES 



818,146.00 
920,119.00 

28,037.00 

11,845.00 
167,858.00 

51,146,005.00 
187,182.00 



817,194.00 
845,581.00 

27,347.00 

10,940.00 
128,319.00 

81,029,381.00 
154,409.00 



3. MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES 
TOTAL SERVICES 



287.833.00 



241,751.00 



81,621,020.00 81,425,541.00 



■28- 





DCLLAR CCST 


DISTRIBUTION 


CF 


CENTRAL 


SHOPS 


EXPEND ITURES 




FISCAL 


YE«R, 


1970-71 




- 29 - 



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30 



APPENDIX 



TABLE NO. 1 



PURCHASE ORDERS PROCESSED 
1969 - 1970 
Purchase 



Orders 



Amount 



1970 - 1971 

Purchase 
Orders 



Amount 



General 
Education 
Health 
Utilities 

TOTALS 



lJ+,1+72 $7,613,725 

7,365 k, 658, 663 

6,019 3,587,932 

6,292 3,996,603 



15,851 $9,995,1^76 

8,811 5,76k, 175 

6,57U 1|, 326,099 

6,533 h, 586,6^9 



3l|,li;8 $19,856,923 



37,769 $2lj.,672,399 



Purchases by 
Encumbrance Requests 



$39,662,853 



$33,351l,320 



TOTAL 



^59,519,776 



$58,026,719 



7A3LR K T 0. 2 
EXPENDITURES 



Comparisons of expenditures with original budget for all 
appropriations except Personal Service for 1970-71. 



Account 



incumbered 
Budgeted & Expended Surplus Deficit 



Contract Services 
0.311.200.000 


$ 32,508 


$ 35,965 


$ 


3A56 


Materials & Supplies 

0. 311.300.000 


16,000 


17,111 




1,111 


Equipment 
0.311.^00.000 


2,337 


2,179 


158 




Premium- Official Bonds 
0.315.812.311 


6,191 


2,712 


3A79 




Premium-Auto Insurance 
0.315.813.000 


85,000 


81,870 


3,130 




Membership Due 
0.311.800.000 


35,567 


37,870 




2,30? 



Totals 



$ 177,603 $ 177,707 $ 6,767 $ 6,870 



REVENUE 



Comparison of Revenues with Estimated Revenues - 1970-71. 



Account 



Sale of Documents 
7061 



Minor Sales 
7062 

Sale of Grease & 
Bones 
7621 



Estimated 


Actual 


Revenue 


Revenue 


600 


Hj.9 


31193 


32326 



Over Under 
Estimated Estimated 



14-51 



670 



1162 



1133 



1|92 



Totals 



32IJ.63 



33637 



U51 



1625